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Accessible Relational Database Management Software (RDBMS) - Anyone know of one?


 

This question has come up on the JAWS group, but it comes up cyclically in many venues.  I do not think I have as yet seen anyone make a full-throated recommendation for an RDBMS that is either 100% accessible or at least accessible to the extent that primary functions like creating tables, indices, and similar are possible.

I've seen it stated, on many occasions, that MS-Access is not accessible.  I have no idea if the equivalents in LibreOffice or Open Office are any better.  Does anyone know of one?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard.

     ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Jaffar Sidek <jaffar.sidek10@...>
 

Brian.  in my experience, No RDBMS is accessible through their GUI interface.  But access can be achieve through the command prompt on windows or the command terminal on the mac.  For most light weight, working RDBMS, i highly recommend SQLITE, www.sqlite.org which is used primarily to keep and manage databases for personal or local use.  Cheers!

On 27/10/2020 6:54 am, Brian Vogel wrote:
This question has come up on the JAWS group, but it comes up cyclically in many venues.  I do not think I have as yet seen anyone make a full-throated recommendation for an RDBMS that is either 100% accessible or at least accessible to the extent that primary functions like creating tables, indices, and similar are possible.

I've seen it stated, on many occasions, that MS-Access is not accessible.  I have no idea if the equivalents in LibreOffice or Open Office are any better.  Does anyone know of one?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard.

     ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Damien Garwood <damien@...>
 

Hi Brian,
It depends. Personally, I use the SQLite console, but I totally get that not everyone is comfortable with the command line.
I haven't touched Microsoft Office since I left school in 2007, and given that I can get by with Notepad2, Thunderbird and SQLite without paying a penny, I don't think I ever would. Unless of course I somehow miraculously got into work and it became a requirement.
Personally I like SQLite because of just how open it is (public domain). So you don't have to worry about anything to do with who owns, or who can spy on, your databases.
I know there are a few GUI systems that use SQLite, whether they are accessible or not is subjective. For me, SQLiteBrowser is accessible in that you can tab around the window, but some of the controls don't speak and some are not intuitively obvious as to what they do. The same holds true for SQLiteStudio, which in some ways is even less accessible.
There are others such as DBeaver and Navicat, but given the two previous failures I haven't tried those.
Again though, you may have more luck with them than I did. And if not, Browser and Studio are both open source, so if you have some programming knowhow they can be tweaked.
Cheers,
Damien.

On 26/10/2020 10:54 pm, Brian Vogel wrote:
This question has come up on the JAWS group, but it comes up cyclically in many venues.  I do not think I have as yet seen anyone make a full-throated recommendation for an RDBMS that is either 100% accessible or at least accessible to the extent that primary functions like creating tables, indices, and similar are possible.
I've seen it stated, on many occasions, that MS-Access is not accessible.  I have no idea if the equivalents in LibreOffice or Open Office are any better.  Does anyone know of one?
--
Brian -Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
*/Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard./*
~ H.L. Mencken, AKA /The Sage of Baltimore/


 

Thanks, gentlemen.  The original questioner actually seems to be having success, via the command line, with one called MariaDB.

And I said to him, and all, that if you are someone who is comfortable with command line interfaces (CLIs), and, let's face it, that's a minority of users, that it's vital you mention that when seeking any sort of software, and which one(s).  I never, even for a second, think of command line only (or optional, but that's how a blind user would likely use it), when anyone is asking about software in general.  CLI stuff is relegated to "the geek class" of software these days.

I was thinking a GUI interface when I asked the question, and so far the answer has been there's no GUI RDBMS interface that's accessible in any meaningful sense of the word.

Thanks again.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard.

     ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Sascha Cowley
 

Oracle SQL Developer is at least partially accessible, and my hunch is that a lot of what you're talking about should be achievable with it.