Re: Braille, how many use it?


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I'd imagine that if they said how it worked then everyone else would do it the same way. Not totally convinced on these displays, but the firmer dots did attract me as I am a bit of a scrubber as many who learnt later in life often can be.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 9:32 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Braille, how many use it?


All that says about the difference from traditional displays is that "The dots
do not give when the user presses them. The dots on some braille displays
using the traditional technology yield to pressure. The technology used in the
Orbit Reader 20 does not exhibit this characteristic. Once the dot is raised,
it stays raised no matter how hard the user examines it."

and

"The second difference from full-featured devices is that the unit refreshes
differently from previously existing technology. The refresh rate is slower,
and the user can just hear the slight tap as each pin rises from left to
right."

So, I can make some guesses about how the dots work in this device, but it
would still be nice to know for sure.

Antony.

On Wednesday 04 October 2017 at 22:17:40, Adriani Botez wrote:

Dear Antony,

here you can read all about it:
http://www.aph.org/research/orbit-reader-20-details/


Best
Adriani

-----Urspr√ľngliche Nachricht-----
Von: nvda@nvda.groups.io Im Auftrag von Antony Stone
Gesendet: Dienstag, 3. Oktober 2017 22:55
An: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [nvda] Braille, how many use it?

Does anyone here know what is special or unusual about the Orbit
technology, so that it's (at least in theory) possible for them to
manufacture and sell for such a low price compared to traditional
displays?

I know that the vast majority, if not all, of other Braille displays are
based on piezo-electric actuators to raise and lower the pins (which partly
explains the price, and also explains the physical size of the displays,
and why multi- line displays can't reasonably be made), but I'm wondering
whether anyone here knows what different technology the Orbit is based on
so that it can be made so much cheaper?


Antony.
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