Re: can't upgrade to the nvda 2017.4 rc


Gene
 

Rosemary didn't know the correct name.  You may be saying the search results seem strange.  Rooter is part of the name of a large sewer cleaning company in the United States and is evidently used by other companies as well.
 
The added and disabled wording implies far too much leeway and discression on the part of those doing the work.  If the tech wants to add something he/she believes is important, it should be discussed with the owner.  Adding something and disabling it might be an option the owner might want to keep in mind and discuss with the tech if he proposes putting a program on the machine that runs in the background and that the user needs to control, such as an antivirus program.  But the unqualified added and disabled wording implies that, for example, if the tech doing the work believes that the person is using an ineffective antivirus program, he can put a different program on as long as it's disabled without the owner's permission.  Since you are not supposed to have two antivirus programs on the same machine, that would leave the person with no working antivirus program and with a program whose accessibility is not known to the tech or, perhaps to the owner as well.  Adding that to the agreement implies far too much latitude and discression on the part of the service people.  It circumvents far too much of the whole point of the stipulation to require permission.  If they don't like the antivirus program you have on the machine, does that mean that they can remove it, place another one on the machine and disable it?  What other implications does such a stipulation confer?  Anything the place doing the work or anyone working for that place wants to upgrade or add cannot be done without permission of the owner.  I don't want any ambiguity or wording that allows discression on the part of the tech in this respect. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 10:19 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't upgrade to the nvda 2017.4 rc

This is a strange one as I pasted what was in that message and as I said got
a list of plumbers.

Your advice is what I'd do but from bitter experience, I always put in
writing that nothing should be added to a computer when it has to go back
for a repair or if it has to be, that it is disabled by default on return to
allow the user to tell what it is first. One cannot expect tech folk used to
dealing with the general public to appreciate the hassle inaccessible
screens can create in the absence of a sighted person. I often feel many
people assume we all have this sighted person on ice in our freezer which we
thaw out every time we need to tell what is going on in the sighted world.
 grin.
 I'd be very wary about using task manager as often security software
refuses to be terminated and gums up the whole machine at that point with
another of its inaccessible screens.
 Even uninstalling one, the classic is Avast, can be fraught with problems,
as it seems that many of them ban screenreaders from even accessing their
uninstallers!

It will be doubly hard if all the person has is Narrator to achieve the end
result, and if even narrator cannot get at the screens that does not bode
well for anything else.
Of course if the person has an I Phone, and has downloaded Seeing AI, then
people are telling me that the short text mode can read computer screens
very well.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Quentin Christensen" <quentin@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 9:46 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't upgrade to the nvda 2017.4 rc


>I would guess, as you did, that the issue is this web rooter.  To get to
> it, you can try:
> 1. Press alt+tab.  Hold down alt and keep tapping tab.  You should either
> find a "web rooter" window or similar, or eventually get back to the first
> window you had open.  Most anti-virus type programs don't have a window
> open so this won't necessarily find it, but it's the easiest first step.
>
> 2. Press WINDOWS+B to move the focus to the system tray (B for... because
> :)  I don't know, it's Microsoft's shortcut).  Next, press right arrow to
> move through the icons and see if you can find it there.  If you have
> "notification chevron" or "notification overflow" or similar, press up
> arrow, then use left arrow to move through those icons.
>
> When you find it in the system tray, press applications key to bring up a
> context menu then down arrow through that, alternatively try enter or
> space.
>
> Look for something like "Exit".
>
> Failing that, press control+shift+escape to bring up task manager and down
> arrow through the running programs to find it.  If you press tab and find
> a
> "more details" button.  Press enter to show more details.  When you find
> web rooter, you can press alt+e to end task (or context menu then find end
> task).  Be sure you are exiting the right app as this will force close it
> and it could have unintended consequences if you close the wrong thing.
>
> The other thing you might want to do, if you don't want this web rooter,
> is
> to open the start menu, type "add or remove programs" and see if you can
> find the program to uninstall.  Note it is a good idea to have an anti
> virus program of some sort running.  On Windows 10 I just use the built in
> defender, but there are third party ones which work as well.  At some
> point
> before uninstalling it, you might check and see if you can access the main
> program window or functions of this web rooter and see if you can access
> it.  If you can and you want to keep it, then you'll just need to figure
> out how to disable it while installing programs.  If it's not accessible,
> it's always worth shooting an email to the program developer to ask them
> to
> make it accessible.  Even if you aren't intending to keep it, your request
> might encourage them to make the program accessible for others (or for you
> down the track).
>
> Kind regards
>
> Quentin.
>
> On Thu, Nov 23, 2017 at 8:27 PM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <
> bglists@...> wrote:
>
>> Unless its what others are saying here, I cannot tell what your issue
>> might be unless you have been relegated to a normal user without any
>> admin
>> rights at all by the company.
>> Brian
>>
>> bglists@...
>> Sent via blueyonder.
>> Please address personal email to:-
>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
>> in the display name field.
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Rosemarie Chavarria" <
>> knitqueen2007@...>
>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>> Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:27 AM
>> Subject: [nvda] can't upgrade to the nvda 2017.4 rc
>>
>>
>> Hi, everyone,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm using narrator to write this message. I tried to update to nvda
>>> 2017.4
>>> RC but when I tried to update to that version, something blocked it from
>>> coming up. I called the microsoft disability line and they couldn't get
>>> it
>>> to come up either. When Best Buys repaired my computer, they put on this
>>> thing called web rooter or something like that. I don't know what to do.
>>> They also installed C cleaner which I really didn't need. How do I allow
>>> web
>>> rooter to unblock nvda so I can upgrade?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for your help in advance.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Rosemarie
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Quentin Christensen
> Training and Support Manager
>
> Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available:
> http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/
>
> www.nvaccess.org
> Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
> Twitter: @NVAccess
>



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