Re: Portable version degrading


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The reason I do not use sd cards is their losability for our listeners!
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: <tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2018 3:11 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Portable version degrading


LOL!



I agree that S.D. cards are a better choice.



As for vinyl, the recording is so big that you can both see and feel it on the media. You can't do that with any traditional computer format-I think that is what give it such stability. Small distortions to the recording don't impede replay.



With regard to burying vinyl recordings in the desert: grains of sand would scratch out the recordings, so I assume you meant they are protectively wrapped and then buried. I still think that might not be such a good way to store vinyl. I remember in the 1970's watching my mom heat a record in the oven and then lay it over a cup to create a vinyl bowl. Unless buried deep enough to not be subject to the heat, the record would be destroyed over time from heat and cold cycle, in my opinion. If buried deep enough to be consistent in temperature, then it becomes accessible to water damage. If you have a link to information on such burials, that would be an interesting read.



All in all though, I agree and think Vinyl has proved itself better at surviving than any computer format. (grinning)



Tonea



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rob Hudson
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2018 8:45 AM


I put my portable NVDA installs on S D cards and use a ten dollar USB card reader. The only way to hurt a card like that is to drop it in water, I guess. And most computers nowadays come with card readers built in to them.

If you're willing to pay a little more, you can buy USB flash drives in protective, rubberized or metal housings. These are a great deal sturdier than the cheapies you can get for a few bucks. Not only do those fall apart easily, but they will go corrupt faster. Even if you unmount them using the "Safey Remove Hardware"

item on windows or the

"umount"

option in Linux. Solid state memory only has a limited number of reads/writes.

The least corruptible data medium I've heard of is vinyl records. I've heard you can actually listen to a vinyl record by spinning it and using a pine needle. They have buried some of our worlds most important speeches and such in the desert on vinyl. I'm not sure what it is about that medium specifically that makes it better suited for long term storage, though.

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