Re: Firefox ESR


Gene
 

Openbook is one example.  Winamp, if you don't use it for files that might be malicious from untrustworthy sources such as certain untrustworthy web sites.  I use Winamp to play safe files, mainly things I've recorded myself or digitized myself or that come from known trusted sources.  MP3 Direct cut, a recording program is another example.
 
Depending on how you use your word processor program, that may not need to be upgraded.  If it no longer receives security upgrades, my understanding is that if you disable things that might allow malicious code to run, such as if your program runs macros automatically, that you can use it safely.  Of course, if you need to use newer file types, you won't be able to do that.  You might be able to read them, but not alter them and save them in the same file type. 
 
I would think that if I thought about programs, I could think of many more but I can't just now.  Others may want to give examples but what I've said gives various examples of some programs that you can use even if they may not receive security updates.
 
I've seen complaints about the latest version of Winamp in terms of stability.  It would normally be a good idea to use the newest version if you are playing files you aren't very confident in.  But there are times when an older version of a program is superior.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

What software does not run in such an environment?

I can only think of machines without a network connection, and that's hardly
useful these days (secure, agreed, but what can they do?).


Antony.

On Thursday 22 February 2018 at 00:39:12, Gene wrote:

> Not all software.  All software that you use in an environment where it
> comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.
> There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR
>
>
> "ESR" means Extended Support Release.
>
> Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
> promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.
>
> There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
> unless:
>
> a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
> latest one
>
> or
>
> b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
> to update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
> between which you are happy with.
>
> Basically, do not run unsupported software.  If security vulnerabilities
> are discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody
> else's fault.
>
> So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
> (which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
> before that version becomes unsupported.
>
> The above is true for all software, not just Firefox.  Not all projects
> have ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term
> Release.
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
> > What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?
> >
> > Andrea

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