Re: Firefox Quantum incompatible with NVDA forever?


Gene
 

I know how the word "quantum" is used in the field of quantum mechanics but I didn't know exactly how to define it.  Here are the two definitions Word Web provides.
1.A discrete amount of something that is analogous to the quantities in
quantum theory
2.(physics) the smallest discrete quantity of some physical property that a
system can possess (according to quantum theory)
 
I suspect a better dictionary would give more comprehensive definitions.  But the expression "quantum leap" means a large change.  It whould mean a small change but, in complete disregard for the meaning of "quantum," it means the opposite. 
 
Who knows why Mozilla decided to name the new series quantum.  In my opinion, one of the most ridiculous aspects of computer culture is the way things are named.  Maybe those who named it had in mind a quantum leap in quality.  Maybe they just liked the sound of the word.  Who knows?  Who's brilliant idea was it to name the bar in firefox that fills different functions depending on how you use it the "awesome bar."  That name tells nothing except that they decided to give it a name that is meaningless as a description of the bar.  It tells how they want you to feel about the bar.  They might just as well call it the awesome browser.  No one would take a car seriously that was named the awesome car.  I don't look for any logic or rationality in how anything is named in computer culture. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, March 24, 2018 12:06 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox Quantum incompatible with NVDA forever?

"Quantum" means the smallest possible amount of something.

Antony.

On Saturday 24 March 2018 at 18:00:41, zahra wrote:

> firefox versions are 64bit only for mac since version 53.
> but for windows, fortunately supports both 32 and 64bit windows.
> i think quantum means very fast.
> in firefox 56 and previous ones, the engine of firefox was gecko.
> but in firefox 57 and later, the engine is changed to photon.
> multiprocess is enabled and firefox recieved many changes to its codes
> and became twice faster.
>
> On 3/24/18, Antony Stone <antony.stone@...> wrote:
> > What!?
> >
> > https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/59.0.1/system-requirements/ says
> > that the
> > latest version, Firefox 59.0.1, runs on Windows 7, 8 and 10, all 32bit or
> > 64bit, plus MacOS 10.9 onwards, and various versions of Linux.
> >
> > Firefox is definitely not 64-bit only.
> >
> > Antony.
> >
> > On Saturday 24 March 2018 at 17:30:52, Roger Stewart wrote:
> >> For sure!  Several versions of Firefox back, they went to 64 bit only.
> >> Guess this is what they mean by quantum.
> >>
> >> Roger
> >>
> >> On 3/24/2018 6:21 AM, Walmir Schultz via Groups.Io wrote:
> >> > My system is Windows 7 SP1.
> >> >
> >> > I wonder if the problem is related to the fact that it is 32 bits.
> >> >
> >> > Em 23/03/2018 12:09, Ron Canazzi escreveu:
> >> >> Hi Walmir,
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> Using Windows 10 and NVDA 2018.1, I have never had any such issues. I
> >> >> am on Firefox 59.01--the latest version and everything is great.  I
> >> >> am wondering if your Windows 7 is the basic 7 or service pack1.  If
> >> >> you have been following this list at all, you will see that NVDA
> >> >> 2018.1 will no longer support any system earlier than Windows 7
> >> >> Service Pack 1.
> >> >>
> >> >> On 3/23/2018 8:01 AM, Walmir Schultz via Groups.Io wrote:
> >> >>> Hi,
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Since Firefox Quantum (57, 58, 59, ,,,) NVDA is having
> >> >>> incompatibility problems.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Is it time to forget about Quantum?
> >> >>>
> >> >>> The 59 version is unusable because NVDA simply don't recognize the
> >> >>> web page, it is "an unknown" objectt.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> I am using Windows 7, NVDA 2018.1 32 bits.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> I am still using Firefox 52 ESR, but almost changing to Chrome.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Sadly, even Google recognized in its accessibility documentation
> >> >>> that Firefox was the best browser to be used with NVDA.Very sad.

--
If you were ploughing a field, which would you rather use - two strong oxen or
1024 chickens?

 - Seymour Cray, pioneer of supercomputing

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