Re: Check Disk


Gene
 

I've never seen any other complaint of this kind, that I recall,  about sleep.  Unless I get evidence that this is any more than arare aberation, I shall consider it such and I shall maintain that people should not be dissuaded from trying sleep when they are ggoing to move their computers in situations such as I shall discuss below. 
 
This is if the computers have mechanical hard drives.  In the case of Windows 10, if fast boot is being used, I don't know if there is any difference that matters between sleep and shutting down and rebooting. 
 
If I'm a student, for example, and I'm moving from one class to another, sleep makes much more sense to use than doing a full shut down and then rebooting.  It may not matter to any extent if you have a digital hard drive because they are so much faster and a full boot up is so much faster.  But with a mechanical drive, shutting down makes no sense. 
 
As far as factors effecting how long hard drives last, here is a summary of some factors, according to the Google study, which was done a number of years ago.  It was the largest study done to that time.  It may still be the largest. 
 
https://www.comparitech.com/blog/cloud-online-backup/how-long-do-hard-drives-last/
Conventional wisdom would have you believe hard drives that get hot will generally fail faster than those that don’t. Some studies conclude as much, but the largest study on the subject matter to date performed by Google suggests otherwise. You might also assume that hard drives which are used more fail quicker than those used less. Not so, says Google:
“Contrary to previously reported results, we found very little correlation between failure rates and either elevated temperature or activity levels.”
Google measured activity (also referred to as “utilization”) levels by analyzing the total time spent reading or writing data on the drive over a period of time. Drives that were utilized more failed significantly more in the first three months, but then failure rates dropped off in the subsequent months and years. The failure rates remain even and even less than the less-used drives until year five, when drives with higher utilization levels start failing more often again. Google attributes this to what it calls the “survival of the fittest theory,” in which the causes of failure that are associated with higher utilization are more prominent early and late in a drive’s lifetime. In short, utilization might not be causing hard drive failure, it just makes the actual causes of failure surface more quickly.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2018 9:27 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Check Disk

I tend to shut mine down completely as this lets it cool down as well.

I've seen sleep mode get interrupted before now for reasons best known to
itself. With a ssd you might as well shut it as there is little speed of
booting overhead one way or the other.
 Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2018 11:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Check Disk


The question is how to run Check Disk from the command prompt.  The drive is
working.

When you run check disk from the command prompt, if you simply want a
report, then just type chkdsk.  The default is read, no errors are
corrected.  Just type chkdsk and press enter and the procedure will start.

At the end, to review the summary, move aroung the screen using review
commands like numpad 7 8 9.  You should be able to move when you are in
object review, I don't think you can when you are in screen review.

and keep in mind that you are just checking the file system the way you are
running check disk.  You aren't checking disk segments, if that is the
correct word, for physical integrity.  To do that, you need to do a thorough
Check Disk and I don't know if you can do that as a read only option.

If you are using a desktop, and it doesn't get moved when it is running, you
would seldom have to check for physical integrity.  If it's a laptop, and
you move it when it's running or it gets some sort of jolts while it is
running, then you should check for physical integrity more often.  I'm not
talking about digital drives, I'm talking about mechanical drives.

I always put my laptop into sleep mode before moving it.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2018 4:27 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Check Disk


Unless its changed the whole thing defaults to read only  just like the disc
check in the tools section of the properties does, as you are still in
effect in windows.
 I have to say that you really do need it to run at start up to get it to
repair stuff whatever you do unless you are checking a drive with no links
to windows on it, say the D: drive at which time it normally unmounts and
remounts afterwards as far as I can see.

Or did I misunderstand the issue? If you suspect problems with any drive.
your first port of call needs to be check all cables and plugs to and from
psu and drive to motherboard before you run any repair on the drive  as it
will only make things worse otherwise.
 Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "kelby carlson" <kelbycarlson@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2018 2:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Check Disk


Okay, can you give me a bit more on what I can expect when I do it with
NVDA? I go to cmd, do chkdsk /r, and then what will happen?
> On Apr 25, 2018, at 8:59 PM, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@...> wrote:
>
> chkdsk will read the disk in read only mode.
>
> I usually run this to see if there are any errors.
>
> Note on all drives even ssds the main tables are always out of sync.
>
> Don't worry about mft mismatch or mft bitmap space errors per say unless
> they are followed or preceeded with usn journal, lost files, and missing
> chain errors.
>
> For whatever reason at least on the os drives windows seems to run things
> slightly out of sync.
>
> Ofcause this only shows on command line point.
>
> Since a chkdsk /x /f and or /r requires the system to be in access only
> mode there is usually no speech during that time.
>
> Any results can be reviewed in eventlog or chkdsk.log  if you use the /log
> switch then c:\chkdsk.log and then its ok I think.
>
>
>
>
>> On 4/26/2018 12:51 PM, kelby carlson wrote:
>> Does anybody know if there is a safe way to run Chkdsk from the command
>> prompt with NVDA? I'd like to do it but don't want to get stuck not being
>> able to read the data if NVDA doesn't come back on during the recovery
>> phase.
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>








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