Re: About Linux


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

sudo is not necessary for anything in your user space.  The only time sudo is necessary is when you need to change system files.  Otherwise, you shouldn't use sudo, and nobody should use root as their main user account.  I've been using linux since 1992, and I've been doing it with speech, so anyone who claims linux isn't accessible is fooling themselves and others.

This one needs the volume up, as it is hard to hear:

Here’s an article not YouTube, on the accessible Linux distros.

I would put Ubuntu at the top of the list, but it is not at the top of this list.

Since this is a couple of years old, Ubuntu comes with Mate desktop, not Unity as mentioned in this list.

The only thing I don’t like about Vinux and Sonar is that is a bit challenging for a beginner to get Eloquence going on them.

Also, they use older Kernels.

Glenn

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 12:08 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

Here’s a little more, in case others are wondering about getting around in Linux…

Glenn

 

I usually set it to laptop mode, and I use the caps-lock with U I O for prior, current, and next line And J K L For words And M comma  and period For letters.

I believe the numberpad works that way too.

Alt F2 is like tapping the windows key in Windows.

Alt + F1 brings up the programs list, there are three columns, system, places, and accessories, which is where you find common programs, like FireFox and eMail programs.

You can use the applications key like you do in Windows too.

Alt + Tab between windows and alt + F4 to close.

Control + alt + D puts you on the desktop.

Just tab around in programs like Windows.

Control + Alt + T

Puts you in the command-line.

Exit gets you out.

You need to type sudo before each command, or to stay in "administrator", type:

Sudo su or sudo -s

Then you will have to exit sudo and exit again to exit terminal.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

I have some info on the Orca screenreader list as well, here’s  links for the list:

Glenn

Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2018 7:00 AM

Send orca-list mailing list submissions to

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit

or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to

 

You can reach the person managing the list at

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] About Linux

 

Hi,

There are many distro’s of Linux that work with Orca the screenreader, so I don’t want to keep this thread going on this list, since it’s off-topic.

But I will mention that I like Ubuntu and that is the most popular distribution in use over all.

I do subscribe to a Ubuntu list, and there is an Orca list as well.

Folks can eMail me off list for help getting started.

And here is some information on the Ubuntu list.

I suspect that if you follow the link to the Ubuntu list and put subscribe in the subject, you might get subscribed.

It is a low-traffic list.

Info below.

Glenn --

Ubuntu-accessibility mailing list

 



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