Re: Hello


Gene
 

Learning some often used commands is important but if you want to use features of NVDA such as screen review and mouse actions, you would likely be far better served by a tutorial explaining such things as object navigation, screen review, and document review.  Object navigation isn't used in NVDA and, while screen review is similar to using the Window-eyes mouse cursor movement and review means of navigation, it isn't the same in terms of commands.  You also need to know how to switch review modes. 
 
For using NVDA with applications where you do everything directly in the application, screen-readers in general are similar.  That's because most commands in that context are Windows commands or program commands. 
 
I'm not sure now what tutorials are current.  I used to recommend Joseph Lee's tutorial, but it isn't clear to me if it is now current.  You may want to use the manual, at least to an extent at this point, but my observation and experience is that most people much prefer and learn better using tutorials than typical manuals.  It may be that the manual would be a good way to review or to learn once you get to a certain advanced level.
 
The manual or the quick commands reference might be a good way to learn basic commands since you are already an experienced screen-reader user.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, May 28, 2018 6:33 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Hello

You can find the commands for NVDA starting at section 4.6 of
https://www.nvaccess.org/files/nvda/documentation/userGuide.html

Sections 3 and 4 of that document will help you with installing and starting
NVDA.

You might also find the following article helpful:

https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/Switching-from-Window-Eyes-to-
NVDA


Antony.

On Monday 28 May 2018 at 11:41:21, Ashley Breger via Groups.Io wrote:

> Sent from my iPhone hi,
> My name is Ashley Breger and I’m interested in NVDA as I am transitioning
> from Window-Eyes and I think the commands may be fairly similar? Am I
> correct in my thinking?
> Any help would be greatly appreciated,
> Ashley Breger

--
If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it,
we'd be so simple that we couldn't.

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