Re: accessible money


Gene
 

But using that argument, making money accessible when it may not be around much longer can be argued to be spending a good deal of money to correct a problem that may not exist so it shouldn't be done.  After all, it would be hard to justify making a building wheelchair accessible if that building were likely to be torn down in two years and it wasn't providing an essential service.
 
Paper money is so much more convenient than coins, that that is why it was adopted in the first place.  Accessibility is a worthy goal, but if accessibility is done at the expense of what is generally a much better system of doing something for people in general, it's a pyric victory.  Even if you win, the public resentment and ridicule will create enormous ill will toward the recipients and set the whole cause of acceptance and integration back significantly.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 09, 2018 7:02 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.  So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.



On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

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