Re: Windows 10 1803 and file explorer sluggishness


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Can you use 10 windows explorer with a portable copy of nvda?
I've never used Jaws with 10, so cannot say about its foibles.
However in addition to the UIA buffering issue, there are the perennial processor idling speed problems plus the windows indexing of open folders that seems a bit slower than in 7, which itself was slow in 7 as well, and any kind of other fancy animations running like sliding, fading and all of that to consider.

In the case of ribbons, yes there is a ribbon remover program for 10, but every time windows does a major update it will need to be run again. It also does not totally emulate windows 7, some of the options seem not to be there.

If you look up ribbon remover you should find it.

I just wish Microsoft would make the menu type a choice as it clearly is more intuitive for sighted users, but not for view restricted blind ones.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Annette Moore" <angelgirl52376@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2018 8:49 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Windows 10 1803 and file explorer sluggishness


what I do, when NVDA doesn't read the list of folders or files in File
Explorer, if I don't just become impatient and restart NVDA altogether,
which does solve the probem temporarily, is to down arrow through the
files because some of them I know from going through them before what
they are, and just entering on the one I think is the one I want. If it
isn't, I just hit backspace and keep going. I've found ways to deal with
this File Explorer sluggishness, but it can be a pain. And I really hate
to say this because I love NVDA, but it doesn't do this in System
Access. System Access has its own quirks in Windows 10, though, one of
which drives me even more batty than the sluggish File Explorer list not
being read quickly by NVDA, and sometimes not even at all, does, and
that is what I call the dead insert key. I can live with a sluggish file
explorer; I cannot live without my insert key. Another thing that helps
is simply to close file explorer altogether and reopen it. I'm trying to
figure out a pattern for why it does this, but I can't seem to. It
*really* does it with Dropbox, though; in fact, when I copy and paste a
file or folder from Dropbox into somewhere else on my computer, I just
automatically restart NVDA. I don't even mess with it. So yeah, I've
figured out ways to deal with it and I can live with it, but glorious
will be the day when it no longer happens. I'll celebrate! Honestly! LOL!

Annette


On 9/2/2018 2:25 PM, Gene wrote:
Others who use Windows 10 will telll you more and we will see if my
memory is correct. As I recall, this is the result of UIA, a system
used much more in Windows 10 to communicate with screen-readers. I
don't think you can do anything about it, as I recall what I've seen
discussed here, though I may have found a partial work around. I
don't use Windows 10 so you can see. I'll explain it after the rest of
my general comments. I wonder if JAWS has the same problem. Others
who know more technically may comment on whether this is a Microsoft
problem or if it will take both Microsoft and NVDA developers to solve
it.
Try this:
I'm giving desktop layout commands:
Move into the folder where you want to find a file. Instead of down
arrowing, move through each item as though it were its own object,
which it is. The command to move by object down the screen is numpad
insert numpad 6. Keep holding insert and pressing six to move through
the list. To move back, the command is numpad insert numpad 4. When
you want to open something, it will not be selected. use the command
numpad insert numpad enter. Execute the command twice, once to select
the item, once to open it. You are doing what a mouse user does when
he/she double clicks an item. You aren't using a mouse but you are
first selecting, then taking an action, in this case opening it, which
is the same sequence a mouse user follows.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Kwork <mailto:istherelife@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Sunday, September 02, 2018 1:02 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* [nvda] Windows 10 1803 and file explorer sluggishness

Since asking this on the Windows 10 list, it was also suggested that I
ask more NVDA users here, so am copying below the message I sent to the
other list with an additional NVDA question.


First of all, I'm still getting used to the idea that File Explore now
uses ribbons rather than the menus on my former Windows 7 installation.

What's bothering me more is the sluggishness when moving around through
files and folders. There seems to be between a quarter and a half second
delay after each press of the arrow and enter keys. Same with the
backspace.

First question: is there a way to toggle between folders and ribbons, or
am I stuck? I'm guessing the answer to be stuck.

Next, is there a way to speed up movement through navigating files and
folders? As far as I can tell, I have all visuals and animations turned
off. The sluggishness remains, and increases over time. Starting and
stopping the "Windows Explorer" process in Task Manager seems to make
things less slow, but still not normal for a few minutes, then things
get more and more sluggish again.

In addition, is there anything in NVDA that I can check to see if it
would help in the new sluggishness? I just miss the snappiness I had in
Windows 7.


If anyone knows what I can do, I'd appreciate it. Thanks.

Travis





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