Re: accessible sms texting from windows with NVDA


mikolaj holysz <miki123211@...>
 

There are a couple ways:
1. VOIP. Someone mentioned callcentric, but I think you should look for something that works with your country so texting numbers in your country is cheap. This is very country-specific, so you won't be able to get much help here, googling and trying to figure it out on your own is your best bed.
Those solutions are usually paid (cheap, but a credit card / paypal / whatever is usually a requirement).
2. E-mail gateways: This has been suggested before but yes, gateways for services outside the US exist. This is, as well, very country specific, but Googling should help in this case too. Try Googling country find carrier of a phone number (or something similar in your language). That will let you determine where the phone number you're trying to text is. Those services aren't 100% reliable, if it's possible to move numbers between carriers and you're trying to text a number that has been moved, it may guess the old carrier. It usually uses numbering classes to guess. Numbering classes are ranges of phone numbers assigned to your carrier for use by your country's phone authority.
After figuring out the carrier, try Googling carrier name email to sms gateway. You should find a domain that you send emails to, the address should usually look like number@domain. Those exist for most (though not all carriers). If the carrier is aMVNO (a small carrier), try Googling the carrier along with a keyword like infrastructure to figure out whose infrastructure it uses. Building mobile infrastructure is very costly, so small carriers usually use the infrastructure of bigger carriers, so it's usually possible to use their gateways. For example, the scenario may look like this:
1. you have a number 123 456 7890 and you know it's an Australian number.
2. You try Googling "find carrier of phone number Australia" and find a website.
3. You enter that number and figure out it's owned by SomeLittleCarrier.
4. You try SomeLittleCarrier sms gateway but you figure out that that carrier doesn't have a gateway.
5. You find out what infrastructure the carrier is using, it turns out they're using the infrastructure of aVeryBigCarrier.
6. You look for aVeryBigCarrier's gateway on Google and find out that their domain is gateway.averybigcarrier.au
7. You send an meail to 1234567890@gateway.averybigcarrier.au and the person gets your text.
Beware that the texts you send that way include your email address and don't come from your phone number.
It's usually hard/impossible to reply to them. Some carriers provide sms to email gateways too, again, Google is your friend.

3. Windows and Android.
If you own an Android phone, you can connect it with your Windows computer so that you will be able to read and write texts on WIndows. Those texts will then go through your phone and will be automatically send to wherever you wanted them to go. The recipient will not know that you've sent them from your computer, as they will come from your phone number. Normal fees for texting will apply, as it will be your phone sending the texts, your computer will only tell it what to send. Of course for that to work, your phone needs to be connected to the Internet.
The apps to do this are usually not very accessible but there's a really good solution called GTalk SMS. It's a bit hard to set up but if you / someone else needs assistance, reach me by email privately and I can provide help.

4. Connecting your phone to your computer. There are solutions to make your computer to act as a bluetooth speaker and keyboard. That way, you will be able to control your phone with your computer and make it sent texts or do anything else you'd like with it. I haven't tried the Bluetooth Keyboard part yet but I may if there's interest. That's the only solution that might work with the iPhone.

If you have an iPhone and want to send texts via an app, not by emulating a bt keyboard on your computer, and also want the texts to come from your number, you will need to get a mac.

I hope that answered all questions you might've had.



W dniu 2018-08-30 o 15:33, Dan Beaver pisze:

Hi,
I have been looking into doing this.  However, there are so many choices I am uncertain which to choose.
Has anyone else figured out any of the apps and services that are accessible using NVDA to do SMS texting from a  Windows system?  If so which are accessible and easy to use?
Thanks.
Dan Beaver

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