Re: Microsoft word question


Gene
 

I should say that the information is there but you may have to experiment to see just how to get to it.  I have Word Starter, which is not the newest version of Word.  I found, when playing with the status line after writing my previous message in the thread, that it may move up a number of lines from the bottom.  If the read status line reads the bottom line and it isn't the status line, moving up should find it.  I also find that information isn't necessarily presented in a proper manner.  Read the line a bit at a time, perhaps character by character in some places.  I found that at times, in my version, the number of words is followed by another number and then a space.  So I might se 101 which means ten words and then the number 1.  I'm not sure what the number 1 is referring to.  It may refer to the page I'm on but I didn't try to figure it out.  My point is that the information is there if you figure out how to read it.
 
Someone has already told you another way to get a word count and that would be easier to use if it matches the procedure in your version.  But you may want or need, for some reason, to use the status line for this or other information.  and its good to know about it just from a standpoint of equality.  If sighted people have this resource and they find it useful, why shouldn't blind people know about it?  You don't have to know everything a sighted person knows or sees in a program but there are certain features that it may be useful to know about. 
 
Programs that still have status lines may have useful information in the status line and it is a good idea to look for a status line in various programs.  At times, useful information is not found in a traditional status line, by which I mean at the bottom of a screen or there may not be one.  but, for example, in MP3 Direct Cut, the program gives you useful information in a line near the top of the page.  When the program is recording, it says, writing and then gives the path and filename of the file it is writing to.  That keeps you from issuing the record command and not knowing if the program is recording.  That line also gives information about how far, by minutes and seconds, you are into the file when you are playing or editing it. 
 
My overall point is that unless people start looking around using review keys in programs where they aren't getting enough information in other ways, they may be significantly limiting the accuracy and/or convenience of use of the program.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Gene
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2018 6:33 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft word question

But using that command reads the entire status bar and it is very difficult, if possible at all, to pick out that one number from all the other information.  However, if you read the status line, that moves the NVDA review location to the status line.  So, if you figure out what order the information is presented, you can review the line item by item and determine the number. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Rui Fontes
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2018 5:27 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft word question

As I said, the hotkey is NVDA+End.

Rui


Às 01:29 de 15/10/2018, Pranav Lal escreveu:
> Hi,
>
> Use the f6 key to cycle between the document and the status bar. I do not know of a hotkey to read it but this may be a good feature request.
>
> Pranav
>
>
>
>
>


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