Re: how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged-in sure could use some help.


Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Gene & List:

 

Yes, Goldwave is a full-featured audio editor & recording program, the registration fee is reasonable at US $50 for life with free upgrades and a variety of add-ins and add-ons.

 

If Virtual Recorder meets people’s needs, great, go for it.

 

Another r4ecording program is Total Recorder, more expensive to register, has nice add-ons which are paid for/. Has a multitrack & video editor, not sure how useful it is with JAWS, NVDA or Narrator.

 

Again, for a simple editor, Notepad is good to start with, followed by WordPad when the person wants to use different fonts, italic, underline, bold etc. Then when they want full-blown Word, they have an idea as to what fonts, print attributes etc. are.

 

Some people may learn WordPad & Notepad in a morning; others may take a few weeks to master these editors.

 

However, starting with a simple program and graduating to Word or Word Perfect makes much sense.

Brian K. Lingard

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: January 5, 2019 7:29 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged-in sure could use some help.

 

I do not overemphasize or alter facts.  However, if three people recommend Goldwave, I may say something like; Goldwave is not a good or is not the best program for what you want to do in response to two or three recommendations of Goldwave.  Intended or not, I think that if three people recommend one program and one person recommends another, many people may decide to try the program that gets three recommendations.  So without changing facts I may make a statement like to do what you want to do, Goldwave is not the best choice, or to do what you want to do, I strongly believe Goldwave is not the best choice and explain why. 

 

You talk about dogmatic statements.  I did not just make a statement you characterize as dogmatic.  I gave very specific reasons to support my statement.  Others are free to disagree. 

 

In the case of the woman who used Excel, that is an entirely different matter.  She does what she wants and she has been doing it a long time.  I do not go around telling people what I recommend if I have not been asked.  However, this is different.  Someone said, I want a program that does exactly this and that.  I tried another program and I could not get it to do it.  Three people recommended a complex program you pay for.  I recommended the program I think is best for the specified purpose. 

 

I could have given considerable information discussing other programs and why I think virtual Recorder is the best choice.  I indicated, without going into a lot of detail, why I think virtual Recorder is the best choice for the needs stated.  If you go into too much detail, it may be counterproductive.  The amount may differ depending on how much the person knows and how the program is intended to be used.

 

In addition, instructors make choices all the time.  When someone is learning how to use a computer and does not know various programs, as an instructor, the instructor does not explain why to use or not to use three word processors and ask the student to choose which to learn.  The instructor does not ask the person to decide between Windows 8 and Windows 10.  If the instructor knows the person wants to use Word, then, of course, the instructor should teach Word, but not necessarily as the first program.  It might make more sense to start with WordPad.  I would think, and I don't know this because I haven't used Word in recent versions, but I would think that when teaching ribbons, it is much better to start in WordPad, where the ribbons are simple than to start in a complex program like Word where the ribbons are very large and complex.  It is the concept, not the complexity at first. 

 

You say you wish I were not so strong in my opinions.  I do not know what other instances you have in mind.  I do not just state opinions, I give reasons for them.  I do not just say something like this is not the best program for someone who is just learning. In addition, not elaborate.  So my dogmatic statements, which I do not think usually are, are supported with reasons and others are free to counter them.  In addition, consider that other things can have the effect of a dogmatic statement as well.  If three people recommend Goldwave, that can have the effect of a dogmatic statement.  Three people recommended this program.  I guess I will try it because it is probably good.  I am not saying Goldwave is not a good program. However, three recommendations for one program and one for another may create a form of majority rules bias when someone is making up their mind. 

 

If you or others want to point out instances where you think I should state things differently, that is fine.  I do not mind discussing such things.  I am not saying I will agree but I am willing to discuss them. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: David Goldfield

Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2019 12:39 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged-in sure could use some help.

 

Gene,

Why do you have to express your opinion strongly to ensure that your point has been properly made? Do not get me wrong: I have strong opinions about lots of things from software to politics to morality. If someone asks for a recommendation and if I think that I have something to contribute to the discussion then I put my recommendation out on the table. This is what I like, this is why I like it, here where you can acquire it and that is all that I need to say about it. I do not feel the need to compete with other recommendations to ensure that my particular one is somehow considered above the others or so that my recommendation somehow stands out enough to shift someone's opinion. That would actually make my recommendations and responses even more biased and I would not fully trust someone who did that. I want to be regarded as a trustworthy resource and not as someone who tries to shift someone's opinion from others, which have been expressed. What I care about is giving people options. I actually do not care if an option other than the one that I present is the one that someone might consider. I just do not care. If I know of several options, I put them out there and state the pros and cons of each. It does not matter to me whether a reader chooses it or rejects it. Lists such as this one are forums where we can share what we know to empower others. I am not interested in making dogmatic statements where I tell someone why they should not use a particular piece of software. I want to know what you know. I am not interested in knowing why you feel that I should not be using a piece of software because it offers more features than what I am using. At one point one of my relatives was using Excel for everything. Not only would she use it for its primary purpose for creating and editing spreadsheets but also she would use it to compose documents. She would enlarge one cell and write documents within that cell. Honestly, my wife and I did think it was a bit crazy and I admit I used to snicker and wonder why she insisted on doing it. Admittedly, when I used to do assistive technology training I would have never trained any of my students to do serious word processing in Excel. That is what Microsoft Word was for. However, this relative was set in her ways and somehow got used to using Excel for word processing even though I am 99 percent sure that Word was installed on that computer. Hey, it was crazy and not something, I would ever encourage for serious writing. However, for her it worked and she was just writing simple documents at home. If I told her that she should use Word, she likely would not have listened. It was what she knew and that was how she intended to write her documents. You would not catch me writing documents in Excel but my point is that somehow she got used to it and, for her, it worked. She was happy and worked very efficiently doing it this way. She also was not my student and so I had to accept it. I honestly wish you were not so strong with your opinions. Just share what you know with no other agenda than to empower people to make their own choices, rather than trying to convince them to make the choice that you feel is best for them.  .

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 1/5/2019 1:13 AM, Gene wrote:

In addition, another reason I express my opinion strongly when a question like this comes up is that so many people recommend Gold Wave.  Audacity is a good program, Mp3 Direct Cut is a good program, Virtual Recorder is a good program but almost all the recommendations are for Gold Wave.  If I did not strongly recommend something, it might be easier for someone to think, well, one person recommended Virtual Recorder and three-recommended Gold Wave.  I guess Gold Wave is a better program.  So the entire context must be considered. 

 

Gene

From: Gene

Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:48 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged-in sure could use some help.

 

In your example, you are saying the person is already using Word for shopping lists.  In this case, someone is asking for a program and they are saying that they followed the recommended settings and they did not work.  At this point, all we know is that the person wants to record what they hear and maybe they want to use line-in. 

 

I'm not helping anyone if I hedge my answer and don't make what I consider is the best recommendation for what the person says they want to do and if they already aren't familiar with a more sophisticated program.  Anyone is free to disagree with me.  However, if someone wants to use a more complex program later, learning this very simple program will not dissuade them.  Indeed, as they get to see how convenient computer recording is, they may be more motivated. 

 

You can posit all sorts of what if or maybe examples.  That gets in the way of evaluating what someone knows, what they want to do now, and making a recommendation based on that. 

 

I do not put any confidence in what the public schools are doing as models.  They have none too good a record of accomplishment and they are trendy.  Was not it almost only yesterday that every child had to have his or her own laptop?  What is happening now?  A revolt of the silicon Valley elite, many of whom have gone to the opposite extreme and won't let their children use computers or devices at all until they are much older than young children. 

 

I invite anyone to disagree and recommend what they want but I also will express my opinion clearly if I have one because I strongly believe I'm not helping people properly if I don't.

 

Gene

Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:12 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged-in sure could use some help.

 

Gene,

I think that it is important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it is not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it is not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I was not initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it is important to consider that. I have heard that in mainstream public schools they are teaching PowerPoint to fourth graders. They do not necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It is much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.

 

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:

If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that is all it will be used for, that is not the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  However, not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It recodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Kevin

Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged-in sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only drawback if you do not register it is that every time you enter it you get the Goldwave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged-in sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave is not free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I will look at the program I am going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Alternatively, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  However, just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in Goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Let us just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Alternatively, maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
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