Re: Keystrokes from other screenreaders NVDA does not have


Richard Bartholomew
 

Using Windows 10, I have no issues accessing Dropbox from the system tray via Winkey+B and pressing return on the button.  Similarly, no issues I’ve noticed with the network settings in systray either.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: 25 June 2019 14:02
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Keystrokes from other screenreaders NVDA does not have

 

I have reported here more than once and one or two other people agreed, that certain icons can't be activated when in the actual System Tray.  This is either one of the same people repeating this as before or its another person reporting the same thing.

 

I don't know what can and can't be worked with now in Windows 10 or if this is still true of the Drop Box icon.  I couldn't get it to activate in the system tray itself, at least at times. 

 

Also, in Windows 7, when you move around after entering the system tray for the first time in a session, if you move with the arrow keys to the network icon, it opens something you don't want to open and you have the annoyance of your moving through items in the system tray interrupted.  We'll see if other people report other problems.  it isn't a question of whether they are minor.  NVDA developers insist that there is no need for the system tray add-on to be incorporated into the program.  there is.  This is not just a question of a different way of doing something.  It is a question of providing a method that works properly in certain instances when the actual system tray doesn't. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 7:19 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Keystrokes from other screenreaders NVDA does not have

 

Hi Ian,

 

If you prefer using the addon and NVDA+F11 that's fine - but I would be interested in exploring what doesn't work for you if you use Windows+B.

 

Is it that you can't get to all the icons with Windows+B?  If that is the case I think I have a solution.  If you press the WINDOWS key, then type "Select which icons appear on the taskbar" (or as much of that as brings up that option in "system settings" to open).  The first item in this settings window is "Always show all icons in the notification area".  If you have it set to "on", then it should show icons for any program running which has a system tray icon.  If you have it set to off, it will only show regularly used or new items and a "Notification chevron button".  To get to those extra icons, press space or enter on that to open the "Overflow notification area", then use the up and down arrows to navigate between all of the icons in both the regular and overflow notification areas.

 

If that isn't the problem you're having, I'd definitely be interested in learning more about the issue.

 

Kind regards


Quentin.

 

On Tue, Jun 25, 2019 at 8:02 PM Ian Blackburn <ianblackburn@...> wrote:

Hi all

I would like to explain why having different ways to access windows features can be useful.

I run Windows 10 latest build 1903

What I will explain is the system tray. Now windows + B goes to system tray. however, sometimes the icons there cannot be activated with NVDA (at least for my situation). The add on which allows NVDA+f11 allows activation of some system tray icons that I cannot access any other  sensible way.

Another example is the  use of the right mouse button. i am talking about the use of the various ways to activate it with the keyboard running NVDA.

The different ways of activating it sometimes produce different results.

The ways I know how to activate the right mouse button include: using the physical button on the mouse, using the function key on the right hand bottom of the QWERTY keyboard near the right CTRl key, using shift+f10 and using the NVDA right mouse klick on the numeric pad. Sometimes any one of these will produce different results on the object you are focused on.

So none of these ways is incorrect but sometimes a particular choice will produce a particular outcome. I am not a programmer and don’t understand the difference from the point of view of the operating system behind these and other commands we use as NVDA users.

i really appreciate the effort and time put in by all those who write NVDA and its adding  because for me on windows NVDA is my primary screen reader.

For whatever reason  Microsoft decided to abandon menus in favour of ribbons but other os’s use menus; including Mac OSX and Gnome on linux.

regards
Ian

On 25 Jun 2019, at 5:36 pm, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:

Before anyone jumps on Peter's question on one side or the other, I'll just throw in for Peter's sake, that is basically where this thread arose from - a discussion in another thread (on drag and drop) around using WINDOWS+B to get to the system tray vs using INSERT+F11 (which some other screen readers offer and you can get in NVDA via an add-on).

I wasn't really looking for a discussion on that in this thread, more using that as an example where another screen reader provides its own keystroke which users feel is lacking in NVDA, and particularly where the reason NVDA doesn't follow suit, is that, like accessing the system tray, there is a built-in way to do it in Windows itself.

Regards

Quentin.

On Tue, Jun 25, 2019 at 7:30 PM Peter Beasley <pjbeasley23@...> wrote:
What’s wrong with windows key B which is that standard windows command for the system tray/notification area.



Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Quentin Christensen
Sent: 25 June 2019 05:37
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Keystrokes from other screenreaders NVDA does not have



The discussion in the Drag and drop thread around the system tray has got me thinking:

- The NV Access philosophy is that if Windows includes functionality which is accessible, why re-invent the wheel

- Users who come from other screen readers get confused when they are encouraged to use the Windows keystrokes for functionality they are used to being provided by the screen reader.



I was going to mention the "Switching from Jaws to NVDA" document in that thread, but in reading it just now, I noted that it does NOT, in fact, include how to perform tasks such as access the system tray.



So, can anyone please give me examples of functionality that other screen readers provide (such as INSERT+F11 to access the system tray), that NVDA expects people to use the Windows keystroke (WINDOWS+B in the case of the system tray) for?



I'd like to collate them and update the relevant documents with them, and potentially even make a document all its own if needed.



Kind regards



Quentin.

--

Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



NVDA 2019.2beta1 now available!



Web: www.nvaccess.org

Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/

User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

NVDA 2019.2beta1 now available!

Web: www.nvaccess.org
Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/
Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/
User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess





 

--

Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

 

NVDA 2019.2beta1 now available!

 

Join nvda@nvda.groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.