Re: Welcome to the new decade

David Moore
 

Yes, a new decade does not start until the 1 of that decade!

It is funny that people thought that 2000 was the start of the new millennium, but it was not until 2001 LOL!

Think about it in this way!

Years 1-10 was the first decade, and the second decade was 11-20, and so on!

That is the easiest way to think about it LOL!

David Moore

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Wednesday, January 1, 2020 4:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Welcome to the new decade

 

I've always thought a new decade started with a year like 2020.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of brian
Sent: Wednesday, January 1, 2020 1:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Welcome to the new decade

 

    I think the reason that so many people think of this year as the start of a new decade is there is no more 19 they hear 20 and think a new set of 10 years has started.  We have started the decade of the 20's so we can say we are now in the 20's and not the teens.  People said the same thing back when y2k happend that the new decade would not start until 2001. This is the first year of the 20's so why not count it as such? 

Brian Sackrider

On 12/31/2019 10:16 PM, Oriana wrote:

Sir,

 

Thank you for your clarifying email. I would like to remind you that the year is only 2020 "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi" in the Western Christian tradition, and is not based on an actually observable incident. Based on historical data, some have argued that the entire numbering system is as far off as 3 years from the census that supposedly took place right before Christ's birth. Also, the Julian/Gregorian calendar, which transfers from 1 BC (year of Christ's birth) to 1 AD (a baby Christ's first birthday?) without a year zero are not the only calendars to measure 2020 years from that point: several other Eastern and Western calendars count the years from 0, which corresponds to 1 BC in the Julian/Gregorian. Taking such discrepancies into consideration, it makes perfect sense to celebrate the birth of a new decade at year zero.

 

Yours respectfully,

Oriana

 

On Tue, Dec 31, 2019, 9:56 PM Ron Canazzi <aa2vm@...> wrote:

Hi group,

I will be ready to wish everybody a happy new decade in precisely one year from now.  The actual fact is that the new decade (the 2020's) does not scientifically start until 12:00 AM January 1, 2021.  The simple fact is that there is nor has there ever been a year zero.  Therefore, when you begin numbering years, it is just as if you are counting any object such as dollars, chickens or daffodils.  You don't have ten of them until you actually have ten in hand. 

Arthur C. Clark the author of 2001 A Space Odyssey predicted this in his 1968 novel of the same name, written concurrently with the production of Stanley Kubrick's movie production. 

In that book, Clark projects that people would celebrate the turn of the millennium on January 1, 2000 rather than when it should be celebrated on January 1, 2001.  This prediction came true--exactly as Clark described it.

So it is with this idea of the beginning of a decade.  So long story short: the decade ain't over until it's over on January 1, 2001.
 

On 12/31/2019 7:26 PM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi everyone,
I would like to wish all of you a great happy New Year. Hope you all had a good time celebrating with your friends or family. May the new decade be an amazing decade for all of you.

Welcome, 2020!

Supanut Leepaisomboon

BBA International Business

Mahidol University International College

 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

 

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