Re: nvda in safe mode


Oriana
 

Gene,

This is definitely a ymmv situation. I've attempted to use system restore to recover files before, as you keep advising, and not only did it not work, it wrote over the data so i was unable to use any other non-hardware-based recovery option - the box was not checked by default on that PC. If you know shadow copies exist, then they might work for you, but if there is any uncertainty, do not attempt system restore or any method that requires downloads or hard drive writes until backup is complete. That is my personal experience.



On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 5:56 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Shadow copy isn't a backup, but it is a part of system restore and it does allow recovery of deleted files or access to earlier versions, if desired.  I can use Shadow Copy to open a file that is an earlier version without restoring it.  it can be opened directly from where it is in Shadow Copy. 
 
I am not advocating using it instead of a backup.  But it is a very useful feature.  I once deleted something the day after I recorded it because I didn't think I needed it any longer.  I found that I had been wrong and I was able to recover it with Shadow Copy because, fortunately, System Restore had made a restore point while it was on the disk.  I hadn't backed it up because I erroneously thought I had already edited it and saved and backed up the edited version.
 
Also, there may be times when you want to open an earlier version of something without restoring it from a backup. You may want to compare versions.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 4:39 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

To be clear, I am not proposing using volume shadow copies.

One should be taking full system image backups using the third-party tool of one's choosing, which is what Microsoft recommends, as well as parallel separate user data backups, which can be using that same third-party tool or Microsoft's own File History if running Windows 8.1 or 10.

System Protection (of which System Restore is a part) has never been intended as a full-recovery utility (which would include user data) and is notoriously flaky.  It's focus is allowing the system to be rolled back in the event that, for instance, a bad new driver were installed that breaks something.  It rolls back the state of the system registry and certain underlying support folders in the Windows hierarchy.  It, as Jackie has already noted, has never, ever been involved in user data backup or recovery. 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Power is being told you're not loved and not being destroyed by it.

       ~ Madonna

 

 

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