Re: New NVDA Story: Open source opens the way


Jacob Kruger
 

Quentin, no worries - and, yes, me and Jacques are in regular direct communication on various topics, including this effort of his. 😉


Jacob Kruger
Blind Biker
Skype: BlindZA
"Resistance is futile...but, acceptance is versatile..."

On 2021-10-13 09:42 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
*makes mental note to note the forum and topic he is replying to next time before promoting the article to someone... which was the article which started this thread....*

Sorry!

On Wed, Oct 13, 2021 at 6:40 PM Quentin Christensen via groups.io <quentin=nvaccess.org@groups.io> wrote:
Good point Jujube re Internationalisation and translating!

And Jacob, you might be interested in the story I posted today on a firm in South Africa: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/open-source-opens-the-way/

On Wed, Oct 13, 2021 at 6:18 PM Jujube <ellaxyu@...> wrote:
Another really important benefit of open source  software, especially screen readers, is internationalization and language support, and I think this is often overlooked. One major disadvantage of commercial screen readers is that they tend to only support the languages that the manufacturer is able/willing to support. This means that commercial screen readers are pretty much a no go if they don't work properly in your language. (Narrator and mobile screen readers are better at internationalization than commercial screen readers due to being built directly into the operating system). The open source nature of NVDA means that it can easily be used by people anywhere in the world, and developers and translators around the world can ensure that NVDA is fully functional in their language. For instance, NVDA has significantly better support for Mandarin input methods than JAWS, and this is I'm sure thanks to Chinese users and developers that have helped add those functionalities to NVDA. I'm sure that would not happen at all with commercial screen readers. Sure, JAWS comes bundled with speech synths and braille tables for numerous languages, and while just having the right speech synths and braille tables can be enough to fully read and write in a number of other languages other than English, JAWS does not seem to work well with Asian language input methods. If I were ever going to have a job that involves typing in Asian languages, then I pretty much have no choice but to use NVDA.

Anyway, this was a long rant, but I really do think internationalization and language support is a significant selling point for NVDA. 

On Oct 12, 2021, at 7:13 PM, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:


Hi everyone,

Today, we're sharing Jacques' story from South Africa. It highlights the security of NVDA, and the importance of Open Source software in business. Plus, what is the difference between a digital signature & a digital certificate? Find out here: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/open-source-opens-the-way/ #OpenSource

Quentin.
--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

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