Re: nvda and e-mails


 

On Tue, Nov 9, 2021 at 10:53 AM, Gene wrote:
This is an example of where a very small adjustment on the part of the user can eliminate a lot of problems. 
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Amen!    And that's not meant specifically as a defense of NVDA and the default behaviors it has.  But very often, no matter what the chosen tool, the user has to, at least to some extent, configure their actions to "the way the tool works" rather than the other way around to develop a smooth and efficient way of working with it.

No matter what ends up getting set up as a default behavior, some will love it, some will hate it, and some will be entirely indifferent.  But in the case of the "hate it" crowd for a given thing, you can often figure out a way around that default behavior that's lightning fast by playing around with things for a while, be they settings, commands to be issued, or a combination thereof.

I just played with both NVDA and Narrator in Outlook, and while I can say that I prefer Narrator the difference was not drastic for the HTML formatted message from Healthcare.gov that I was using for my example.  One thing that Narrator does that I have not seen either JAWS or NVDA do, and I don't recall Narrator having done in the early days, that really helps sighted assistants is that it literally highlights each and every word and/or object like a link/button/etc. it's reading as it reads it.  It's like having a blue square being your follow-along finger.  I realize that this would not be of significance if you cannot see it, but it makes a huge difference when someone who's blind and someone who can see are collaborating and sitting and looking at the same screen at the same time.  I haven't looked at JAWS in a while, but I used to get so lost when it was blithely reading all from the virtual cursor and nothing whatsoever moved on the screen.  It could be several pages down in a document and still showing the first page on the screen.  Trying to figure out how to guide my student about "what to do next" when I was lacking the context of where we were, exactly, was a real challenge.  NVDA gets around this with the Focus Highlight feature, and JAWS has something similar, but neither does a follow the word I'm reading sort of highlighting, but you are definitely kept in the same region of text, with scrolling, as the end of what had been visible is reached.
 
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Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 

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