Re: File Explorer woes


Sarah k Alawami
 

The sad thing is, when I had computer training, I was not taught the difference between windows os keys and screen reader keys. I have a funny story to tell about that but I might put that one on the chat group. Many of us probably even today if we are with a trainer are not taught the difference. Hit alt tab, good, never have I heard of in my years of listening to other trainers, “hit alt tab, this is a windows keyboard shortcut.” Now hit capslock t. This is a screen reader shortcut.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, December 6, 2021 9:27 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] File Explorer woes

 

On Mon, Dec 6, 2021 at 11:52 AM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

as to me this could devolve into a chat topic if we are not careful.

 

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Truthfully, it's already a Chat Subgroup or Windows Access for Screen Reader Users Group topic because it has nothing whatsoever to do with NVDA.

This is a classic example of where a question of the type, "How do I use {insert thing here} with NVDA?," is, in actuality, "How do I use {insert thing here} with the keyboard?"   It doesn't matter whether you're using JAWS, NVDA, Narrator, or some other screen reader of which I'm unaware.  Control of File Explorer is entirely "a Windows thing" and your screen reader is simply telling you what's going on.  No screen reader specific commands are ever (or virtually ever, I'm sure someone can pull out some ultra-rare exception) used in working with File Explorer.

I know that there are some members here who very strongly dislike my insistance on being clear about what you're asking about, but just the act of doing that often gets you much closer to the answer, or where you need to seek it.  And it's fairly simple to think about the three levels that you're dealing with, as one of them is almost always the one of clear focus:

1. Windows (or any part of Windows)
2. Your screen reader itself - which is where its commands, configuration, add-ons, and documentation come into the picture
3. The application program the screen reader is being used to access

If what you're asking about falls under categories #1 or #3, it's not a question about your screen reader, and the answers do not depend on which screen reader you use nor even whether you use a screen reader at all, with the very rarest of exceptions.

It only takes a few moments thought to "category sort" and, by extension, know where you should ask the question you're seeking an answer to.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard

 

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