locked Re: A serious plea from a (now retiring) NVDA contributor: when developers ask people to fill out a GitHub template, developers really mean it


 

And I think that several things need pointing out:

1.  There is a huge difference between a bug report, which requires real specificity, and a feature request, which can be much broader.

2.  I have written a tutorial, and included MS-Word fillable-form templates, to make it easy for those who are new to the NVDA GitHub process to correctly fill out a bug report and submit it.  Here it is again:  Creating an Issue in GitHub for NVDA

3.  For a bug report, if you don't include as close to everything as you possibly can in that report, it is highly unlikely that the issue even can be addressed.  There is the rare occasion when an item, maybe 2, will be skipped, but it's rare.  The things being asked for are what form the basis for telling developers where to look and how to reproduce the issue you're having.  You can't fix what you can't reproduce.

4. There are plenty of occasions where what you think is a bug with NVDA is not.  The procedures asking that you restart your system, restart NVDA with Add-Ons disabled, and turn on logging and submit the log when neither of the previous two steps have resulted in an issue going away are also essential.  Some issues are directly related to the specific computer on which they're happening.

5. The folks at NVAccess should expect that feature requests will, by their nature, be broadly expressed and, on occasion, require follow-up with the person who submitted them.  This is the exact opposite of a bug report where the reporter should be expected to have supplied the exact information requested and performed the steps outlined as part of putting together a bug report.  These two types of issues are quite different where one gives broad brushstrokes and the other very precise "engineering drawings" because their respective purposes are quite different.  Those on both sides of both of these types of issue reports need to understand that.
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Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Constantly insisting on “my rights” with no consideration of “my responsibilities” isn’t “freedom” — it’s adolescence.
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         America 2022: Where Everyone Has Rights and No One Has Responsibilities,
        New York Times, February 8, 2022

 

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