Date   

Braille Pen touch braille display

ann
 

Hi,


Does the Braille Pen touch display work with NVDA? If not directly, is there a work around to get it to work?


Thanks,

~Ann


Re: Show Cursor

Mallard
 

Brian,


I was thrilled when the add-on was announced. I kept having squabbles with my sighted husband and son, whenever I needed help and I saidd I was viewing something they couldn't see...

This add-on may not be perfect, as you say (there's always room for improvement!), but it did solve a lot of intricate situations when I needed help and could get it much quicker...

Ciao,

Ollie

Il 17/11/2016 18:51, Brian Vogel ha scritto:

Mallard,

I am ashamed to say that this did not even enter my mind even though I long ago installed this add-on on my own machine to assist me in following where NVDA is focused.

I will also add that it is not perfect, but it's so darned good that it could serve as an example of how this can be done.

For myself, I probably wouldn't even need the actual highlight boxes if screen readers do what NVDA and this add-on do together, and that's make what's showing on the screen actually reflect what's got focus (or very near to it). Very often what's got focus can be pages ahead of what's showing on the screen. I understand that what's showing on the screen is utterly irrelevant to someone who's blind, but I assume, particularly in work contexts, that there is a lot of interaction between blind and sighted colleagues and this particular behavior leaves both sides of a "hey, take a look at this" situation in a suboptimal position.

--
*/Brian/*

*/Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t./*

//~ Lauren Bacall



Re: Show Cursor

 

Mallard,

        I am ashamed to say that this did not even enter my mind even though I long ago installed this add-on on my own machine to assist me in following where NVDA is focused.

        I will also add that it is not perfect, but it's so darned good that it could serve as an example of how this can be done.

        For myself, I probably wouldn't even need the actual highlight boxes if screen readers do what NVDA and this add-on do together, and that's make what's showing on the screen actually reflect what's got focus (or very near to it).  Very often what's got focus can be pages ahead of what's showing on the screen.  I understand that what's showing on the screen is utterly irrelevant to someone who's blind, but I assume, particularly in work contexts, that there is a lot of interaction between blind and sighted colleagues and this particular behavior leaves both sides of a "hey, take a look at this" situation in a suboptimal position.

--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Show Cursor

Mallard
 

So does NVDA, but you need a specific add-on, called Focus Highlight.

You can download it from the NVDA add-on page.

hth, ciao,

Ollie

Il 17/11/2016 17:57, Domingos de Oliveira via Groups.io ha scritto:
Hi,
NVDA is not able to show the position of the Cursor visually.
Screenreaders that can do that are VoiceOver on iOS and Narrator for
Windows 8 and higher. They put a rectangle around the focussed
element.
HTH Domingos

2016-11-17 16:28 GMT+01:00, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com>:
Not that I can help Ralph, but I will echo the situation he reports. As a
sighted JAWS tutor who, for obvious reasons, does still rely on sight as
part of my sensory input when doing anything in day-to-day life, one of the
things that has driven me crazy is that no effort is made to have what's
shown on the display itself follow the virtual cursor when long documents,
whether web pages or other, are being read.

There are tons of times in daily life when someone wants to call someone
else over to "have a look" at something but when you're dealing with a
screen reader very often what you as "a sightee" are actually looking at has
absolutely no relation to what a screen reader user is hearing and trying to
find it is no easy task. It also often involves completely screwing up the
place where the screen reader had been as well.

One improvement that any screen reader could have is linking scrolling on
the display to match the travel of the virtual cursor.
--
*Brian*

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If
you’re alive, it isn’t.*

~ Lauren Bacall


Re: The New Firefox version

Mallard
 

Firefox is indeed getting worse and worse. I'm looking into abandoning it altogether, and would already have done so, if it weren't for Webvisum, which I need fairly frequently.

Rumola never worked for me, so I'm stuck for now... Until further developments.

Ciao,

Ollie

Il 17/11/2016 18:18, Brian's Mail list account ha scritto:
Apart from a few issues version 48 will work on all windows from xp up.
Sadly things started to go bad on 49 amd seemingly continue to get worse after that.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
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in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Arlene" <nedster66@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 5:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] The New Firefox version


I can't say I don't blame you.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun
Everiss
Sent: November-16-16 9:29 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] The New Firefox version

It seems to only happen if I edit the end of an address bar.
Right now I have selected the end of the bar in the case of twitter names
and then hit delete and that works well enough.
However if you screw a site up you have to kill what you spelt and hmm well
hit an arrow to get focus.
On the subject of sluggishness I used classic theme restorer to hide the
toolbars for navigation and remove all colours on toolbars, this seemed to
speed things up a little bit.
I also have changed a lot of the newer modern windows to older windows as
well as a few extra dom related things with that program.
Firefox is as fast as it ever was, but its a disturbing trend that stuff
like this is happening, I am still using it but to be honest if security was
not a major issue I'd drop back a version and either never update or drop
back to 3x which works however I like to stay as updated as i can for
security reasons.



On 16/11/2016 11:04 p.m., Gene wrote:
I didn't save earlier messages about Firefox so I'm answering in a new
thread. I just downloaded and tried the new version and this problem
appears to be very easily worked around. If you delete a letter or more
than one in the address bar, simply right arrow once then start moving left
again and, at least in my tests, things are read properly. While this
problem should be corrected, this appears to resolve the problem.

Gene







Re: spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Sappi 5 broken? I'm sure there is an item on fixing this in windows 7 on the Microsoft site.

Something to do with reinstalling and a registry hack, but was not paying attention sorry.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Devin Prater" <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2016 3:30 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable


I managed to get Window-eyes for office with a trial of Microsoft Office.
Window-eyes 6.1 was the version I grew up with, but when I tried it a month
or so ago, it wasn't all that good. It was more sluggish than NVDA, and
didn't seem to work as well either. And with Window-eyes only having
eSpeak, and my Sapi5 being broken, I didn't have very good voice options
either.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2016 at 9:50 PM Pauline Smith <paulinesmithh@comcast.net>
wrote:

What is spss?


Pauline



On 11/16/2016 5:51 AM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
hi,

I got spss to be slightly more accessible by enabling the java access
bridge. However, nvda cannot read any of the controls. The log shows a
windows access violation error. I find this to be absolutely
unacceptable that nvda doesn't support such an important program. The
same program works flawlessly with jaws.








Re: Firefox and potential timing issues

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes its a bit like the old explorer issue of scrolling getting ahead of reading.
Could be maybe just sluggishness in the reading by nvda as I cannot actually see the screen these days.

I used Firefox 48 last night on an xp machine and realised it was actually better at this than windows 7 with my quad core and huge amounts of memory.

I seriously wonder if all this pretty stuff is taking its toll on speeds.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Felix G." <constantlyvariable@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2016 3:46 PM
Subject: [nvda] Firefox and potential timing issues


Hello list,
has anyone else noticed that when quickly arrowing in a web page in
Firefox, or quickly hitting the same navigational key, such as k, a few
times, some elements are spoken twice? It is as if something couldn't keep
up. Also, hitting a navigational or arrow key a few times then stopping,
the cursor sometimes jumps back.
Here is an example. Let's say there are numbered lines on a web page, like
so:
Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
etc.
Now, when quickly hitting down arrow repeatedly, I might get:
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4
Line 3
Line 4
Line 5
Line 4
Line 5
Sometimes this or a similar issue affects even the read all function, so
that it double-speaks some words or parts of words, like so:
Mary had a little lamb, its fur was white as snow, had a little lamb and
everywhere that Mary went, the went, the lamb was sure to go.
Are there any known workarounds or at least similar observations with
possible theories as to what might be going on?
Kind regards,
Felix Grützmacher


Re: firefox regression

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes downdate Firefox I'm afraid.
grumble moan...
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "enes sarıbaş" <enes.saribas@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 10:47 AM
Subject: [nvda] firefox regression


hi,

With the 50.0 version of firefox, when backspace is pressed in the address bar, everything typed is read out instead of the character deleted. Is there a fix for this?



Re: spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I think the approach has to be that way since we have always had people who writ software who do not integrate their code with anyway of the accessibility APIs consistently or sometimes at all. If there had been more rules that you have to obey when writing code you probably could not get code for things that can run on other platforms.
There are lots of scripts in nvda and indeed in most of the readers. the dolphin ones use Lieue or some such system for its scripting, but I'm not aware what others do.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Travis Siegel" <tsiegel@softcon.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 5:49 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable


This is something folks generally don't realize. Jaws is nothing but a
glorified scripting engine. If you deleted all the scripts from jaws,
there would be next to nothing it could do all by itself. This is an
approach I never liked, and I never understood why screen readers didn't
make more of an effort to just read what's on the screen, regardless of
what/where it was. NVDA works hard to accomplish this, and this was
also the approach of windowbridge (hey, I didn't bring it up), It's
always boggled my mind how little the commercial screen readers (with
the exception of windowbridge) could do on their own. I'm strongly of
the opinion that script based screen readers are useless, because if
there is no script, the program can't do anything. If it mad an attempt
to see what was on the screen, at least then you have a fighting chance
to find what you need on the screen, even if it doesn't know what it
is. I never understood the whole scripting approach myself, but some
folks seem to like it, so I guess if it works for them, then more power
to them, but it certainly isn't my choice, I'd much prefer to have a
screen reader that at least makes an attempt to see what's on the
screen, instead of saying, oh well, no script, can't help you.



On 11/16/2016 11:11 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

SPSS (if it's the same SPSS <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPSS> I
know of, and it probably is), was originally called the Statistical
Package for the Social Sciences, is ancient, and has long since come
into common use for number crunching in many disciplines. That being
said, SPSS was developed long before accessibility was on virtually
anyone's radar.

I was, for a very long time, under the grossly mistaken impression
that screen readers had been developed such that they could make a
decent attempt to read virtually anything that might pop up on a
screen. I was recently disabused of that notion when working with a
client who was expected to be able to use Interaction Desktop by
Interaction Intelligence and a number of custom screen-based, but not
web-based, programs developed for the client company. It became
abundantly clear instantly that JAWS (in this case, but it could have
been any screen reader, this isn't JAWS bashing) was utterly incapable
of interpreting the first thing that was on the screen because the
underlying scripting for these applications did not exist. We take
for granted the way screen readers do function with common office
suites and web browsers because an untold number of hours have been
dedicated to creating the scripting that ships with them to handle
these programs. There is no way that any company can develop scripts
"for everything" so the focus will logically be on the things that can
benefit the most people in the most settings. SPSS is absolutely a
niche market, writ large. In the context of the population at large,
blind or not, very, very few people will ever touch SPSS. That would
not be a logical place to dedicate a lot of resources to as a result.

The above being said, after my experience with the client I made
reference to, I was able to determine that there are several sites
that had blind individuals using the software in question and that a
significant scripting base was in place already and I believe it was
actually done by Freedom Scientific. What I do not understand is why
companies like Freedom Scientific, when they're doing this work, do
not have some contractual language in place that allows them to add
said scripts to a central repository that they would maintain. It is
insane to keep reinventing the wheel, and that's exactly what happens
when it comes to relatively little used commercial software when
scripts have to be created, again and again, for each blind user at
each site. I was shocked that Freedom Scientific could not tell me
whether any scripts existed or whether JAWS was known to have been
used over Interaction Desktop. Screen readers themselves are niche
markets in the grand scheme of things and they would be boosting their
respective reputations and really serving an important function of
increasing accessibility for niche products if they set themselves up
as centralized script repositories, with the proviso that they are not
actively maintaining said scripts, just so a baseline would exist to
work with when needed.

You can't convince me that SPSS hasn't been scripted, probably
hundreds of times now, but where, for what screen reader or screen
readers, who knows?
--
*/Brian/*

*/Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.
If you’re alive, it isn’t./*

//~ Lauren Bacall





Re: The New Firefox version

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Apart from a few issues version 48 will work on all windows from xp up.
Sadly things started to go bad on 49 amd seemingly continue to get worse after that.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Arlene" <nedster66@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 5:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] The New Firefox version


I can't say I don't blame you.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun
Everiss
Sent: November-16-16 9:29 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] The New Firefox version

It seems to only happen if I edit the end of an address bar.
Right now I have selected the end of the bar in the case of twitter names
and then hit delete and that works well enough.
However if you screw a site up you have to kill what you spelt and hmm well
hit an arrow to get focus.
On the subject of sluggishness I used classic theme restorer to hide the
toolbars for navigation and remove all colours on toolbars, this seemed to
speed things up a little bit.
I also have changed a lot of the newer modern windows to older windows as
well as a few extra dom related things with that program.
Firefox is as fast as it ever was, but its a disturbing trend that stuff
like this is happening, I am still using it but to be honest if security was
not a major issue I'd drop back a version and either never update or drop
back to 3x which works however I like to stay as updated as i can for
security reasons.



On 16/11/2016 11:04 p.m., Gene wrote:
I didn't save earlier messages about Firefox so I'm answering in a new
thread. I just downloaded and tried the new version and this problem
appears to be very easily worked around. If you delete a letter or more
than one in the address bar, simply right arrow once then start moving left
again and, at least in my tests, things are read properly. While this
problem should be corrected, this appears to resolve the problem.

Gene




Re: spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

If you listen to the interview on cool blind tech about accessibility from the English lady, you will hear that they fully intend to keep support for third party readers as well as develop their narrator. I personally still do not like the Narrator its got lots of issues like lag and many missing features. After all, just because Msoft have a mail program it does not mean you cannot use another one same with browsers and word processors.

Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 17, 2016 3:02 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable


Well no one makes more apple screen readers.
I agree with you we do need more choice.
But the average blind person can't afford the 3000 dollars pluss nz for something so there isn't choice.
We have nvda which is good.
narator which is ok maybe.
Window eyes which is only good if you spend 500 bucks on office pro, dolphin supernova which is well 1000 to 1500 and jaws which is 3000.
We have satogo I guess but we don't have any other free screen readers.
I agree in a perfect world we would have different readers for different programs but the comercial ones cost a lot of cash.



On 17/11/2016 12:03 p.m., Gene wrote:
For years, Microsoft was criticized for being a monopoly. Blind people who want Microsoft to build their own powerful screen-reader are asking Microsoft to take actions that would make them much more like a monopoly in the area of screen-readers. Demanding blind users routinely have more than one screen-reader on their machines. That's because one screen-reader may work well with a program and allow them to use the program well where other screen-readers may not. Why should businesses and foundations support work by NVDA if Windows produces a powerful screen-reader. Depending on what the Microsoft screen-reader could do, it might reduce choice by causing one or more other screen-reader companies to go out of business as well. Monopolies often result in more expensive products and reduced competition and choice. That is simply a historical economic fact.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 4:50 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable


Well it semi is.
Ms never gave us a reader in the past.
This has forced comercial companies to make their own things to work.
Ofcause they will now go at ms for trying to steal their market I would.
I do think though sadly that the comercial reader market is for funders
at schools and things and I am unsure if that rings true anymore as such
now anyway.
Lets hope ms actually do just say screw them all and do it.
They technically could, they will just have to work with others.
I also don't believe all this stuff about putting blind people out of work.
Maybe a few of their blind people loosly out of work, I am blind, I
don't work they act like the blind have a job which in reality they don't.
Those companies can get rid of their people when they like its a really
nasty argument to be honest.
When I had school and uni and got funding for things up to 2006 it was
oh you can get a job, its so false, I won't go into it fully but fact is
the fake story they spin to make the poor helpless blind feel better
sickens me.
I'd prefur they told me how it was when I was old enough instead of me
discovering it on my own.
Even with the intergration the mainstream is not interested in the blind.
Its not even because of our helplessness, the mainstream world goes
faster than the disabled in general even for themselves the corperate
life is no picnic.
Even if we get a job even with a few of us in the large companies for
the rest of us if there is a job it will be either something we get
ourselves or for something we will manage.
I want to work and bar a few contracts way under the bottom end of the
standard dollar, I actually spend my life like a normal disabled person
does, at home, doing anything by a normal working day.
I really wish they wouldn't use that trump card maybe in the 60s and 80s
it had some sort of traction but now, you either find your own nitch,
struggle along and are left behind in the dust.
After I found how false it was, I decided to quit trying to even find a
job normally because it was false and try to forge my own path where I can.
If they that just want the cash want the perfect dream they are welcome
to it.
I doubt that once it gets down to it the big users that is normal users
and I am sure there are a lot of them after they quit school are not
going to bother with a comercial reader.
I do use dolphin products for a few games that nvda doesn't but I use
nvda as an exclusive now to what I am doing.
They are losing out now.
Due to the fact I don't work in the mainstream I don't need mainstream
programs like office.
The big readers kater to office mainly and as secondary cater to other
things.
I'd like to think that something like nvda at least caters to well
everything from user programs to business programs to almost anything.



On 17/11/2016 10:02 a.m., Travis Siegel wrote:
I know narrator bites as a general purpose screen reader, but that's not
microsoft's fault. MS tried to build a general purpose screen reader
(just like Apple did), but when they tried, organizations like the NFB
jumped all over them screaming about how bad it would be for the screen
reader market if MS had their own screen reader, and how many blind
people it would put out of work, how ms would be able to do things with
their screen reader third-party screen readers couldn't, and so on and
so on. As a result, MS had to scale back the functionality of narrator
turning it into what it has become. So, in this particular case, you
can't blame MS for the state of narrator, they actually tried, and were
blocked by special interest groups. Admittedly, I'm no fan of
Microsoft, and defending them is the last thing I would want to do, but
in this particular for instance, it truly isn't their fault.



On 11/16/2016 3:10 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
One thing while we are on the subject which concerns me is how chummy
some of our tech reviewers are.
I know for example that cool blind tech is up and cosy with microsoft
maintaining that narator is really good as a primary reader.
Narator has never been good as a primary reader, its why I am using nvda.
In 10 they are trying to make it better but I can't trust them
anymore, why are we buying jaws, using nvda and other things when we
could just use narator.
Narator was bad to start off with, its reputation as far as I care is
ruined.
Its just the microsoft setup screen reader on a windows desktop now in
mobile it aparently works for its apps.
But we want more than microsoft apps.



On 17/11/2016 6:49 a.m., Travis Siegel wrote:
This is something folks generally don't realize. Jaws is nothing but a
glorified scripting engine. If you deleted all the scripts from jaws,
there would be next to nothing it could do all by itself. This is an
approach I never liked, and I never understood why screen readers didn't
make more of an effort to just read what's on the screen, regardless of
what/where it was. NVDA works hard to accomplish this, and this was
also the approach of windowbridge (hey, I didn't bring it up), It's
always boggled my mind how little the commercial screen readers (with
the exception of windowbridge) could do on their own. I'm strongly of
the opinion that script based screen readers are useless, because if
there is no script, the program can't do anything. If it mad an attempt
to see what was on the screen, at least then you have a fighting chance
to find what you need on the screen, even if it doesn't know what it
is. I never understood the whole scripting approach myself, but some
folks seem to like it, so I guess if it works for them, then more power
to them, but it certainly isn't my choice, I'd much prefer to have a
screen reader that at least makes an attempt to see what's on the
screen, instead of saying, oh well, no script, can't help you.



On 11/16/2016 11:11 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

SPSS (if it's the same SPSS <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPSS> I
know of, and it probably is), was originally called the Statistical
Package for the Social Sciences, is ancient, and has long since come
into common use for number crunching in many disciplines. That being
said, SPSS was developed long before accessibility was on virtually
anyone's radar.

I was, for a very long time, under the grossly mistaken impression
that screen readers had been developed such that they could make a
decent attempt to read virtually anything that might pop up on a
screen. I was recently disabused of that notion when working with a
client who was expected to be able to use Interaction Desktop by
Interaction Intelligence and a number of custom screen-based, but not
web-based, programs developed for the client company. It became
abundantly clear instantly that JAWS (in this case, but it could have
been any screen reader, this isn't JAWS bashing) was utterly incapable
of interpreting the first thing that was on the screen because the
underlying scripting for these applications did not exist. We take
for granted the way screen readers do function with common office
suites and web browsers because an untold number of hours have been
dedicated to creating the scripting that ships with them to handle
these programs. There is no way that any company can develop scripts
"for everything" so the focus will logically be on the things that can
benefit the most people in the most settings. SPSS is absolutely a
niche market, writ large. In the context of the population at large,
blind or not, very, very few people will ever touch SPSS. That would
not be a logical place to dedicate a lot of resources to as a result.

The above being said, after my experience with the client I made
reference to, I was able to determine that there are several sites
that had blind individuals using the software in question and that a
significant scripting base was in place already and I believe it was
actually done by Freedom Scientific. What I do not understand is why
companies like Freedom Scientific, when they're doing this work, do
not have some contractual language in place that allows them to add
said scripts to a central repository that they would maintain. It is
insane to keep reinventing the wheel, and that's exactly what happens
when it comes to relatively little used commercial software when
scripts have to be created, again and again, for each blind user at
each site. I was shocked that Freedom Scientific could not tell me
whether any scripts existed or whether JAWS was known to have been
used over Interaction Desktop. Screen readers themselves are niche
markets in the grand scheme of things and they would be boosting their
respective reputations and really serving an important function of
increasing accessibility for niche products if they set themselves up
as centralized script repositories, with the proviso that they are not
actively maintaining said scripts, just so a baseline would exist to
work with when needed.

You can't convince me that SPSS hasn't been scripted, probably
hundreds of times now, but where, for what screen reader or screen
readers, who knows?
--
*/Brian/*

*/Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.
If you’re alive, it isn’t./*

//~ Lauren Bacall









.


Re: Show Cursor

Domingos de Oliveira <domingos20000@...>
 

Hi,
NVDA is not able to show the position of the Cursor visually.
Screenreaders that can do that are VoiceOver on iOS and Narrator for
Windows 8 and higher. They put a rectangle around the focussed
element.
HTH Domingos

2016-11-17 16:28 GMT+01:00, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com>:

Not that I can help Ralph, but I will echo the situation he reports.   As a
sighted JAWS tutor who, for obvious reasons, does still rely on sight as
part of my sensory input when doing anything in day-to-day life, one of the
things that has driven me crazy is that no effort is made to have what's
shown on the display itself follow the virtual cursor when long documents,
whether web pages or other, are being read.

There are tons of times in daily life when someone wants to call someone
else over to "have a look" at something but when you're dealing with a
screen reader very often what you as "a sightee" are actually looking at has
absolutely no relation to what a screen reader user is hearing and trying to
find it is no easy task.  It also often involves completely screwing up the
place where the screen reader had been as well.

One improvement that any screen reader could have is linking scrolling on
the display to match the travel of the virtual cursor.
--
*Brian*

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If
you’re alive, it isn’t.*

   ~ Lauren Bacall
--
Domingos de Oliveira
- Online-Redakteur

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Mail: domingos20000@googlemail.com
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Firefox and potential timing issues

Felix G.
 

Hello list,
has anyone else noticed that when quickly arrowing in a web page in Firefox, or quickly hitting the same navigational key, such as k, a few times, some elements are spoken twice? It is as if something couldn't keep up. Also, hitting a navigational or arrow key a few times then stopping, the cursor sometimes jumps back.
Here is an example. Let's say there are numbered lines on a web page, like so:
Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
etc.
Now, when quickly hitting down arrow repeatedly, I might get:
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4
Line 3
Line 4
Line 5
Line 4
Line 5
Sometimes this or a similar issue affects even the read all function, so that it double-speaks some words or parts of words, like so:
Mary had a little lamb, its fur was white as snow, had a little lamb and everywhere that Mary went, the went, the lamb was sure to go.
Are there any known workarounds or at least similar observations with possible theories as to what might be going on?
Kind regards,
Felix Grützmacher


Re: spss inaccessibility: absolutely inexcusable

Devin Prater
 

I managed to get Window-eyes for office with a trial of Microsoft Office. Window-eyes 6.1 was the version I grew up with, but when I tried it a month or so ago, it wasn't all that good. It was more sluggish than NVDA, and didn't seem to work as well either. And with Window-eyes only having eSpeak, and my Sapi5 being broken, I didn't have very good voice options either.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2016 at 9:50 PM Pauline Smith <paulinesmithh@...> wrote:
What is spss?


Pauline



On 11/16/2016 5:51 AM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
> hi,
>
> I got spss to be slightly more accessible by enabling the java access
> bridge. However, nvda cannot read any of the controls. The log shows a
> windows access violation error. I find this to be absolutely
> unacceptable that nvda doesn't support such an important program.  The
> same program works flawlessly with jaws.
>
>
>
>
>





Re: Show Cursor

 

Not that I can help Ralph, but I will echo the situation he reports.   As a sighted JAWS tutor who, for obvious reasons, does still rely on sight as part of my sensory input when doing anything in day-to-day life, one of the things that has driven me crazy is that no effort is made to have what's shown on the display itself follow the virtual cursor when long documents, whether web pages or other, are being read.

There are tons of times in daily life when someone wants to call someone else over to "have a look" at something but when you're dealing with a screen reader very often what you as "a sightee" are actually looking at has absolutely no relation to what a screen reader user is hearing and trying to find it is no easy task.  It also often involves completely screwing up the place where the screen reader had been as well.

One improvement that any screen reader could have is linking scrolling on the display to match the travel of the virtual cursor.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



about nvda previous versions and compatibility with firefox

 

hello every one.
i have a question about compatibility of firefox 47, 48 and 49 with
previous versions of nvda including 2015 and 2016 versions.
did you try this?
for example is nvda 2016.1 and before, compatibile with the versions
of firefox which i mentioned?
thanks so much and God bless you.

--
we have not sent you but as a mercy to the creation.
holy quran, chapter 21, verse 107.
in the very authentic narration is:
imam hosein is the beacon of light and the ark of salvation.
best website for studying islamic book in different languages
al-islam.org


Show Cursor

Ralph Boersema
 

Hi Folks,

 

I have what is probably a very simple question. When I ask a sighted person about something on a web page, I am told that they cannot see where I am. What setting do I need to use to show the review cursor or what should the sighted person be looking for to see where I am reading?

 

Warm regards,

Ralph


Re: some of my messages are getting deleted

Alexander Masic
 

The reason kould for this be that the spafilter automaticly remov what it think is suspissios mail. So you may unblock your friend from spamfilter, or mark it as no spam. If you use Thunderbird there is an dedicated inbox for spam -mail, Shure if you check there you may find your friends letter there.

 



Den 2016-11-17 kl. 04:47, skrev Gene:

I doubt anyone can give you more than a speculative answer.  What program did this occur in?  Are you using pop3 or IMAP?  Maybe you should use a different e-mail program.  Or maybe, if you are using POP3, you should have messages left on the server for a certain amount of time.  I have my messages remain on the server for one day so that if anything unexpected happens, I can still see them using my provider's webmail site or another e-mail program to download them in. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 9:34 PM
Subject: [nvda] some of my messages are getting deleted

Hi, everyone,


A friend sent me a message that I wanted to read. I read it and shut
down to go do something else. When I got back the message was gone. Why
is this happening? I don't want messages deleted unless I delete them
myself.


Thanks for your help in advance.


Rosemarie







Re: Focus issue when opening MS Word

Christo Vorster
 

Hi

I use ALT+TAB when I get stuck with winword, it works for me.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pranav Lal
Sent: Thursday, 17 November 2016 12:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Focus issue when opening MS Word

Hi Jacques,

No go. I tried hitting the alt key after switching to winword but pressing the alt key several times in quick succession did nothing.

Pranav

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jacques
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 11:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Focus issue when opening MS Word

I think it was Pranav Lal who recently posted about a focus issue when opening MS Word. I also experience this occasionally. The window title reports "winword" and the NVDA hot key, NVDA+control+F1 confirms that "winword.exe" is the active application. I believe this issue will be looked into by the devs in due course, but in the interim I find that pressing and releasing the alt key in quick succession forces focus to the opened document.

HTH

--
Jacques


Re: Focus issue when opening MS Word

Jacques <lists4js@...>
 

Hi Pranav

Interesting, it would seem that system specific factors may have an influence on this behaviour. Occasionally Word opens just fine here without me having to force focus. I'm running Office 365 on my home systems, but have seen the same behaviour on my work laptop where Office 2013 is installed. I also get this in Excel, but once again, only occasionally. I do not experience this focus issue with any other applications though.


Jacques

On Thursday, 17 November 2016 12:30, Pranav Lal wrote:
Hi Jacques,

No go. I tried hitting the alt key after switching to winword but pressing the alt key several times in quick succession did nothing.

Pranav

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jacques
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 11:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Focus issue when opening MS Word

I think it was Pranav Lal who recently posted about a focus issue when opening MS Word. I also experience this occasionally. The window title reports "winword" and the NVDA hot key, NVDA+control+F1 confirms that "winword.exe" is the active application. I believe this issue will be looked into by the devs in due course, but in the interim I find that pressing and releasing the alt key in quick succession forces focus to the opened document.

HTH

--
Jacques