Date   

Re: Publishing EBooks with NVDA?

Gene
 

Another member of this list explained how to get the Drop Box application to run with Xp even though it isn't supposed to any longer.  I tried the procedure and it works.
Here is my recollection of the procedure.
When you run Drop Box, you will be asked to sign in and you will hear a short cut command.  Execute that command. 
I believe your default browser opens to the log in page.  Whatever opens, log in.
You can then use Drop Box as previously.  You don't have to keep logging in.  I did this procedure once and after some synchronization by the application, things were back to normal again.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Joe Paton
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 1:50 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Publishing EBooks with NVDA?

Hello David,

dropbox works on windows above xp, and maybe even vista is out of the loop these days.

Running either of those operating systems, you must go on line to manage your dropbox folders.  But the desktop app is fine on
seven, eight.1 and 10.  The web site offers a few challenges, but
can be managed just about.

I know nothing of e-books publishing, or e-books desktop apps,
other than Kindle.

Can't comment on one drive or google drive either.
But messages i have seen, suggest that both will have their
problems, but these can be overcome.

If you are wanting to back-up, take a look at carbonite.

https://www.carbonite.com/
good luck.

J.P





On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 13:20:41 -0500
"David Russell" <david.sonofhashem@...> wrote:

Hello NVDA group,
Websites like www.daisy.org highly recommend author Dave Gunn's
"Accessible eBook Guidelines ....." (title snipped). Have you found
accessibility and or compatibility with major eBook publishing
programs used with a screen reader to be a real, major, challenge or
hurtle?

This question is more for those with no vision or very limited vision.

Alongside that, Dropbox may work well with IOS devices compared to
desktops or laptops, but what cloud portals work well with desktops
and laptops?

Thanks for your input.

--
David Russell
david.sonofhashem@...







Re: Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 02:01 pm, Gene wrote:
Opening an attachment often automatically causes it to be executed. 
 
Gene

. . .

Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 2:45 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

hi gene,

opening the attachment isn't a problem. Executing the file is. I recieved a spam mail that contained a malicious javascript enclosed in a zip file.  My antivirus, avira, missed it. When I uploaded it to virustotal, I was the first one to upload it and only 2 antiviruses caught it.

And this again points up a number of the things I've been saying.

These days issues with infected attachments are few and far between because either the e-mail provider (e.g. Gmail), the individual user's antivirus/security suite, or both scan attachments before the end user can ever even get access to them and will remove them if they are determined to be infected.  Trying to spread something by e-mail attachment is an almost guaranteed failure.

The comment by Enes simply reinforces my point that if a particular piece of malicious software is new enough that it is not always going to be detected by any particular individual security scanner.  Depending on the timing of sample submissions, speed of analysis, timing of suites updating their definitions, etc., can determine whether something is quarantined or not.

Automatic execution of attachments is generally turned off these days by default because it had been so problematic in the early days as well.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Anti Virus

Gene
 

Opening an attachment often automatically causes it to be executed. 
 
Gene

Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 2:45 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

hi gene,

opening the attachment isn't a problem. Executing the file is. I recieved a spam mail that contained a malicious javascript enclosed in a zip file.  My antivirus, avira, missed it. When I uploaded it to virustotal, I was the first one to upload it and only 2 antiviruses caught it.


On 11/19/2016 9:03 PM, Gene wrote:
No matter how careful you are, you can still be infected, even by going to reputable sites if those sites are hacked or if the advertising on those sites is hacked.  Yes, people should follow good safety procedures.  but that does not minimize the need or usefulness of good antimalware programs. 
 
And no matter how careful you are, what about the moment of inattention.  I'm very careful about not opening attachments.  but even so, there was one time in perhaps fifteen years or longer, that I wasn't really thinking much about what I was doing and opened an attachment that came from a message that looked as though it was from someone I knew.  If I had been paying proper attention, I wouldn't have done so but the point is that unless you are sure that you will always be paying proper attention from now until you stop using computers, there is always a small or very small chance for error.  I've seen techs or techies minimize the importance of antimalware programs.  Frankly, I consider this to be the overconfidence of knowledge.  I believe that safety is the lesson of knowledge and experience.
 
Genee
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

I agree, the first point of security should be your head.
Next I'd use something like firefox with better privacy for flash
cookies, ublock for adds, and noscript for scripts.
That way if you click malware it may not run.
To be honest I have been tempted to get more passive protection that
gets stuff before it handles things.



On 20/11/2016 6:44 a.m., Brian Vogel wrote:
> I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless.  It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.
>
> As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection.  Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that.  Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.
>
> If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK.  If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening.  Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.
>
> Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career.   Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".
>
> This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10 ( http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/632487/windows-defender-as-integral-part-of-windows-10/ ) , which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
> --
> *Brian*
>
> *Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.*
>
>    ~ Lauren Bacall
>




Re: Anti Virus

 

Well just for the heck of it I googled the question this is the first answer I got.
http://askbobrankin.com/can_a_virus_really_destroy_your_hard_drive.html
Now viruses are not the most destructive things that can go wrong.
Ransomware is a little higher but the worst viruses are those that have configured or have misconfigured systems.
People assume that the default is good and it may not be.
Often when I have recieved a system for maintaining I go through their programs list, malware scan the system, update drivers and bios then ask about them what is this, what is it used for.
9 times out of 10 I get, a site told me it was good, or a friend told me it was good or it came from the system, or I couldn't afford program x and the x place said I needed y z program and I can't buy it so I had to crack it and now I have a virus or something so I loeded 20 programs to get rid of it.
Firstly, if someone is telling you you need x program you probably do.
You can probably get round with another program unless you need the spaciffic functionality, look at microsoft office.
Yes I'd like it, no I don't need it.
True I loose outlook but I have thunderbird, firefox, openoffice and others, I have jarte for my word processer, etc, etc.
Next, While there are a lot of bad hackers out there, a lot are actually putting those skills to good use, for as many comercial programs out there there is probably an opensource app which may do some if not all the functions or bits.
In the beginning I had a professional cd creating program, I couldn't afford it so like most of us in the 90s I cracked it.
Later on with all the crazyness going round I looked for what I needed.
Goldwave cost me 40 bucks but had a cd extracter in it.
I got a reasonably expensive ocr solution and also a video converter suite.
I have a free youtube software on top of that and a free cd creation program, and there are other ways.
I had winzip for ages because it was the best but I always had to get past the reg screen so I hacked that.
Now after it became inaccessible I use 7zip which does the same thing but is faster.
You don't always find what you want especially when a free program goes bust sometimes but there are ways to get round as long as you can throw the bulky suite away and use 5 different modules.
You have to adapt.
Next if you get it came with the system.
Then read the forking manual, search it online and you will probably find that most of what it came with the system crap is just crap.
And if not it needs to be configured or it can be removed if absolutely not needed.
There are bits of crap I choose to leave on my system that control sensors and power and the like but I know I could have done with the minimal.
The only things you really need are the drivers for your core pc devices, prodcessers, video, sound and thats it.
Storage is good, and your usb ports.
Over that sensors if they have anything maybe network cards and utilities for the sensors.
If you are a hunking programmer or a guy that wants to fiddle with his bits then install the big utility suite, and some extras.
And if you want the backup program and like it install and buy that.
If you don't mind the games install those and whatever.
If you are in a business and can use accessibly the remote app and the other sharing use them.
Most users won't need that stuff.
You will never need the office trials, the wild tangent games or the outdated programs, trials and other junk installed on a system.
If someone said I heard it from a friend or a site, I usually look at it myself.
Now if its a friend and you know they used it and it was good fine but even so.
Its like the person that says windows10 made my system not work and so I will sue ms because I had to buy another one.
The only time that happens with me or those I maintain is if the system is so old, fixing it would end up with it probably failing later and so I push for a replacement or modification.
Maybe I shouldn't bother fixing systems maybe I should buy some ransomware that basically says your files are encripted because your computer is broken, please give me 5000 dollars to buy you another one.
I wander how many would fall for it.
I suspect a lot.
Its a shame we a re so gullable!!!

On 20/11/2016 7:37 a.m., Gene wrote:
I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer. Most malware doesn't. it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries associated with malware. I don't know anything about your neighbor's knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven records of knowledge and reliability. There is an enormous amount of misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and related matters.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus


Hi, Arleen,




I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.




Rosemarie









On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history. Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery. I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks. If you are on sites you login always log out. Sites like drop box or others. Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it.



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus



On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10. If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either. It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.

~ Lauren Bacall








Re: Anti Virus

 

I couldn't aggree more.
Sadly all the malware tools I have used have found false alarms that basically mean important stuff can get deleted.
You then have to exclude these, which is fine but then you are excluding bits from protection.
Sometimes the software picks up on programs it was happy with for ages long and says they are bad.
I have only had it do this to an old text editer which since got updated and a few games.
But I know in one case where a friend of mine got it so it got nasty with her screen reader, drivers and bits of windows.
She had to reformat to get it working, I am unsure if she ever solved it right.
While I am no sinic, there is a point where you shrug your sholders and think maybe a crappy security software is better than this advanced one which I need to make sure and moniter daily to make sure nothing is stuffed up on my computer more than it is.
Allready one of my software packages is mangled by some software its not important and well some other things have stopped working.
A good reformat will fix them but they are not important either but then I am lucky.
There is no easy way to submit to these previders easily either which adds to the frustration.

On 20/11/2016 7:03 a.m., Gene wrote:
No matter how careful you are, you can still be infected, even by going to reputable sites if those sites are hacked or if the advertising on those sites is hacked. Yes, people should follow good safety procedures. but that does not minimize the need or usefulness of good antimalware programs.

And no matter how careful you are, what about the moment of inattention. I'm very careful about not opening attachments. but even so, there was one time in perhaps fifteen years or longer, that I wasn't really thinking much about what I was doing and opened an attachment that came from a message that looked as though it was from someone I knew. If I had been paying proper attention, I wouldn't have done so but the point is that unless you are sure that you will always be paying proper attention from now until you stop using computers, there is always a small or very small chance for error. I've seen techs or techies minimize the importance of antimalware programs. Frankly, I consider this to be the overconfidence of knowledge. I believe that safety is the lesson of knowledge and experience.

Genee
----- Original Message -----

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 11:52 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus


I agree, the first point of security should be your head.
Next I'd use something like firefox with better privacy for flash
cookies, ublock for adds, and noscript for scripts.
That way if you click malware it may not run.
To be honest I have been tempted to get more passive protection that
gets stuff before it handles things.



On 20/11/2016 6:44 a.m., Brian Vogel wrote:
I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless. It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.

As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection. Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that. Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.

If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK. If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening. Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.

Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career. Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".

This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10 ( http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/632487/windows-defender-as-integral-part-of-windows-10/ ) , which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
--
*Brian*

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.*

~ Lauren Bacall


Re: Anti Virus

 

Well I did have one on a server once, I was able to kill it easily enough, it did do a lot of system dammage and needed me to fix it but it wasn't dead.
Its likely they took it back to a shop and they were tricked into replacing it or something.

On 20/11/2016 7:42 a.m., Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, Gene,


I asked my neighbor for proof of her computer being destroyed but she
couldn't give me an answer. I had a trojan on my old computer but it
didn't totally destroy it. I was able to get rid of the trojan.


Rosemarie



On 11/19/2016 10:37 AM, Gene wrote:
I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer. Most
malware doesn't. it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to
do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries
associated with malware. I don't know anything about your neighbor's
knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be
maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven
records of knowledge and reliability. There is an enormous amount of
misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and
related matters.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Rosemarie Chavarria <mailto:knitqueen2007@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

Hi, Arleen,


I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door
neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally
destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end
up getting a brand-new computer.


Rosemarie




On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge
clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.
Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your
hystery. I have my computer not remember passwords even though it
asks. If you are on sites you login always log out. Sites like drop
box or others. Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and
I always do it.

*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of
*Brian Vogel
*Sent:* November-19-16 9:49 AM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several
times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day
but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10. If you open
Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update
has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my
machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under
Windows 8.1 either. It would make absolutely no sense for any modern
antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update
its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
*/Brian/*

*/Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is
complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t./*

*//*~ Lauren Bacall


Re: Anti Virus

 

Sounds like she got scared by the shop.
A virus can't destroy a computer.
The only way that this can happen is if it gets in the bios and since normal users can't get access to those, the only way this ever happens is if someone connects a memmory stick or other device with a virus in its firmware in the first place.
It can happen where for example in apple computers there was a thunderbolt security issue.
And there have been autorun viruses but not many.
I do know this, you can't just contract one out of the blue even if you downloaded one.
I guess you could get something that ran your drive till it died or something but destroy your ram, or something no.
The only other way a virus could destroy a system is Iguess make your cpu overheat to a point where it melted.
Or over charge your battery in your laptop till it exploded but you would notice it before it got that bad.

On 20/11/2016 7:28 a.m., Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, Arleen,


I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor
told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her
computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a
brand-new computer.


Rosemarie




On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean
out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history. Even
though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.
I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks. If you
are on sites you login always log out. Sites like drop box or
others. Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always
do it.

*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of
*Brian Vogel
*Sent:* November-19-16 9:49 AM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several
times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but
the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10. If you open
Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has
taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my
machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under
Windows 8.1 either. It would make absolutely no sense for any modern
antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its
own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
*/Brian/*

*/Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.
If you’re alive, it isn’t./*

*//*~ Lauren Bacall


Re: Anti Virus

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Gene and Others,


I don't know if it is true any longer, but I was told by a techie doing a postmortem on my old Windows 98 system that someone using a Linux system had hacked my computer and 'flashed the bios.'  He did so in such a way that the system would not connect to any external computers: Internet with modem, Internet with LAN, other computers with cables and so on.  I forget the exact technical aspects of it, but I did have to get a new system.  I guess there is much better built in bios protection now of days, so maybe this isn't possible any longer.



On 11/19/2016 1:37 PM, Gene wrote:
I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer.  Most malware doesn't.  it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries associated with malware.  I don't know anything about your neighbor's knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven records of knowledge and reliability.  There is an enormous amount of misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and related matters.
 
Gene 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

Hi, Arleen,


I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.


Rosemarie




On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    

 



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: Anti Virus

enes sarıbaş
 

hi,

The antivirus I use, avira, has an automatic task to check for updates every 2 hours.


On 11/19/2016 8:48 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:
Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    




Re: Anti Virus

enes sarıbaş
 

hi gene,

opening the attachment isn't a problem. Executing the file is. I recieved a spam mail that contained a malicious javascript enclosed in a zip file.  My antivirus, avira, missed it. When I uploaded it to virustotal, I was the first one to upload it and only 2 antiviruses caught it.


On 11/19/2016 9:03 PM, Gene wrote:
No matter how careful you are, you can still be infected, even by going to reputable sites if those sites are hacked or if the advertising on those sites is hacked.  Yes, people should follow good safety procedures.  but that does not minimize the need or usefulness of good antimalware programs. 
 
And no matter how careful you are, what about the moment of inattention.  I'm very careful about not opening attachments.  but even so, there was one time in perhaps fifteen years or longer, that I wasn't really thinking much about what I was doing and opened an attachment that came from a message that looked as though it was from someone I knew.  If I had been paying proper attention, I wouldn't have done so but the point is that unless you are sure that you will always be paying proper attention from now until you stop using computers, there is always a small or very small chance for error.  I've seen techs or techies minimize the importance of antimalware programs.  Frankly, I consider this to be the overconfidence of knowledge.  I believe that safety is the lesson of knowledge and experience.
 
Genee
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

I agree, the first point of security should be your head.
Next I'd use something like firefox with better privacy for flash
cookies, ublock for adds, and noscript for scripts.
That way if you click malware it may not run.
To be honest I have been tempted to get more passive protection that
gets stuff before it handles things.



On 20/11/2016 6:44 a.m., Brian Vogel wrote:
> I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless.  It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.
>
> As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection.  Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that.  Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.
>
> If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK.  If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening.  Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.
>
> Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career.   Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".
>
> This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10 ( http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/632487/windows-defender-as-integral-part-of-windows-10/ ) , which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
> --
> *Brian*
>
> *Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.*
>
>    ~ Lauren Bacall
>




Re: Publishing EBooks with NVDA?

Joe Paton
 

Hello David,

dropbox works on windows above xp, and maybe even vista is out of the loop these days.

Running either of those operating systems, you must go on line to manage your dropbox folders. But the desktop app is fine on
seven, eight.1 and 10. The web site offers a few challenges, but
can be managed just about.

I know nothing of e-books publishing, or e-books desktop apps,
other than Kindle.

Can't comment on one drive or google drive either.
But messages i have seen, suggest that both will have their
problems, but these can be overcome.

If you are wanting to back-up, take a look at carbonite.

https://www.carbonite.com/
good luck.

J.P

On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 13:20:41 -0500
"David Russell" <david.sonofhashem@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello NVDA group,
Websites like www.daisy.org highly recommend author Dave Gunn's
"Accessible eBook Guidelines ....." (title snipped). Have you found
accessibility and or compatibility with major eBook publishing
programs used with a screen reader to be a real, major, challenge or
hurtle?

This question is more for those with no vision or very limited vision.

Alongside that, Dropbox may work well with IOS devices compared to
desktops or laptops, but what cloud portals work well with desktops
and laptops?

Thanks for your input.

--
David Russell
david.sonofhashem@gmail.com


Re: Anti Virus

Nimer Jaber
 

Hello,

I have and continue to recommend Sophos Home for accessibility reasons, and also because it is highly rated y independent labs. Moreover, Sophas tends to sell their products to businesses mostly, and have a very reliable product. They are 100% accessible.

Thanks.

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 1:10 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I didn't keep your last message in this thread so it won't be quoted below.  but I'm glad we had the exchange.  Empahsizing the importance of the user knowing how to protect him/herself may be construed by some as an implied view that it is unimportant to use antimalware programs if you know how to protect yourself in other ways.  I am therefore, pleased that it has been clarified that your position is that such a program or programs should be used even if you know how to protect yourself by safe practices.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 11:44 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless.  It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.

As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection.  Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that.  Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.

If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK.  If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening.  Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.

Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career.   Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".

This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10, which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 11:10 am, Gene wrote:
Empahsizing the importance of the user knowing how to protect him/herself may be construed by some as an implied view that it is unimportant to use antimalware programs if you know how to protect yourself in other ways.

That would be an even greater folly than spending hours worrying about precisely what antivirus you're running, so long as you're using any antivirus or security suite.

This class of program is an essential component of operating any computer that interacts with cyberspace, particularly any Windows computer, since Windows is the most popular target for viruses and malware since it's got the biggest embedded base.

Just for the record, those who use Macs, are on Android or iOS powered smartphones, and, now, even Linux are fooling themselves if they don't have some sort of security scanner running on those platforms as well.   All have reached the critical mass of embedded base where, while not as popular or "as much fun due to amount of devastation" for virus/malware coders, there are enough users to make them targets.   They get hit a lot less frequently, but they do get hit.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Anti Virus

Gene
 

I didn't keep your last message in this thread so it won't be quoted below.  but I'm glad we had the exchange.  Empahsizing the importance of the user knowing how to protect him/herself may be construed by some as an implied view that it is unimportant to use antimalware programs if you know how to protect yourself in other ways.  I am therefore, pleased that it has been clarified that your position is that such a program or programs should be used even if you know how to protect yourself by safe practices.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 11:44 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless.  It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.

As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection.  Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that.  Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.

If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK.  If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening.  Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.

Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career.   Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".

This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10, which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Need to advise a sitghted person

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 01:41 am, Shaun Everiss wrote:
well on radio one of the blind djs I listen to says one of his uncles who is a truck driver or something likes to run jaws to read him his stuff so he can read the news paper while he drives his truck.

As a tangent on this, I also know people who prefer screen readers rather than, say, books on tape (or similar) because even the best of the new voices don't put the kind of inflections on narrative that attempts to project what they think it means or how they interpret it.    It allows someone to use their own imagination as far as how a character might be uttering a given phrase instead of having that already assigned by the human reader.

I can see how this has a certain appeal to it.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Anti Virus

 

Roger,

            I will repeat this one last time:  Windows Defender automatically updates its own definitions like all other modern antiviruses do.   It would be worse than worthless if it didn't.

            Many people, and I'm one of them, leave our computers running for days at a time after they've been started up.  Any antivirus that claims the name has to update its own virus definitions which can sometimes be updated multiple times daily (but that's not often the case, but it is on "busy" days).

            Windows Defender does perfectly well in taking care of itself and keeping itself up to date.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Anti Virus

 

I have yet to see any virus/malware or similar that can physically destroy hardware.   Some of these infections are truly hideous, and can basically brick your computer, but if you have someone who can wipe the hard drive and reinstall an operating system from scratch (be it Windows or other) I have never seen a machine that cannot be rise like a phoenix from the smoldering ashes of a really virulent infection.

Whether or not that makes economic sense to attempt is another story altogether.  I've advised a number of clients to not waste their money having me do such on old hardware with an old OS when buying even a low end new computer gets them hardware that's light years ahead of what they've got.  I then run whatever "exorcism" software I think necessary on their old machine's hard drive while it's attached as though it were intended as an external hard drive before doing a simple data transfer for any old files they would rather not lose (and very often that's photographs that they do not have backed up).

One thing that I tell every client, friend, acquaintance, or random passer-by on a group such is this one is that the first investment you should make if you don't have one already is for an external backup drive, and preferably one that's entirely USB powered and intended for a laptop even if you intend to use it on a desktop or for backing up multiple machines.   These are incredibly cheap insurance and if you keep it hooked up to your primary machine with a backup program that keeps constant versioned backups of your precious data files it can save you a world of hurt in the event of a hard disc crash or malicious infection.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Anti Virus

Roger Stewart
 

Someone mentioned that the checking for virus database updates in Defender could be set with Task Scheduler. I tried looking around in it and I find a long list of tasks that it can schedule but I didn't find anything in there about Defender or Windows Defender.  There were several listings for things I couldn't identify at all as they just had very cryptic names with a bunch of numbers and letters.  Maybe one of these is it, but I couldn't identify Defender at all. Can someone tell me how to find and set a schedule for it?  I've never used that scheduler before.

Thanks.

Roger












On 11/19/2016 11:44 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless.  It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.

As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection.  Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that.  Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.

If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK.  If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening.  Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.

Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career.   Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".

This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10, which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    




Re: Anti Virus

Arlene
 

Oh good. Those things are a parasite.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: November-19-16 10:42 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

Hi, Gene,

 

I asked my neighbor for proof of her computer being destroyed but she couldn't give me an answer. I had a trojan on my old computer but it didn't totally destroy it. I was able to get rid of the trojan.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

On 11/19/2016 10:37 AM, Gene wrote:

I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer.  Most malware doesn't.  it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries associated with malware.  I don't know anything about your neighbor's knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven records of knowledge and reliability.  There is an enormous amount of misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and related matters.

 

Gene 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

Hi, Arleen,

 

I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    

 

 

 


Re: Anti Virus

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Gene,


I asked my neighbor for proof of her computer being destroyed but she couldn't give me an answer. I had a trojan on my old computer but it didn't totally destroy it. I was able to get rid of the trojan.


Rosemarie



On 11/19/2016 10:37 AM, Gene wrote:
I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer.  Most malware doesn't.  it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries associated with malware.  I don't know anything about your neighbor's knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven records of knowledge and reliability.  There is an enormous amount of misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and related matters.
 
Gene 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

Hi, Arleen,


I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.


Rosemarie




On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall