Date   

Re: OCR software?

David Tanner
 

Actually it is still around and is now called text Kleiner pro and the price is $99 it's not too bad but it could be better.

David Tanner

From my iPhone 7

On Jan 12, 2017, at 7:05 PM, Life My Way via Groups.Io <lifemyway@...> wrote:

from what i know it is still around


On 1/12/2017 5:58 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
I wonder if the software called "Text Cloner" is still around. For what it was/did, that was a cool little program!
 
Chris.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    




Auto change language

coscell@...
 

Hi,

How can we perform the Automatic language switching function in wordpad.
Could someone provide the tesing steps? Thanks!


Re: Question/Will NVDA Ever Have a Digits/Full Numbers Toggle?

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,


In essence--at least with editors such as Notepad MS Word and probably a lot more, if you use the numpad in the proper review mode and highlight a large number and press the numpad 5 key twice, NVDA will read the number by individual digit.


As far as the read all or read to end feature, I guess it's up to the developers.

On 1/12/2017 8:09 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
Yes, no, no, and depends:
* Yes for next (alpha quality) snapshot builds.
* No for master (perpetual beta) snapshots.
* No for 2016.4.
* For 2017.1, depends.
There is a member of this forum who has worked on this feature and might be able to explain what's going on (it isn't me).
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 5:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Question/Will NVDA Ever Have a Digits/Full Numbers Toggle?

Hi. I'm wondering if NVDA will ever possess a toggle to switch from the speaking of full numbers to single digits.

--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: Question/Will NVDA Ever Have a Digits/Full Numbers Toggle?

 

Hi,
Yes, no, no, and depends:
* Yes for next (alpha quality) snapshot builds.
* No for master (perpetual beta) snapshots.
* No for 2016.4.
* For 2017.1, depends.
There is a member of this forum who has worked on this feature and might be able to explain what's going on (it isn't me).
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 5:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Question/Will NVDA Ever Have a Digits/Full Numbers Toggle?

Hi. I'm wondering if NVDA will ever possess a toggle to switch from the speaking of full numbers to single digits.


--
David Goldfield,
Assistive Technology Specialist

Feel free to visit my Web site
WWW.DavidGoldfield.Info


Re: OCR software?

Life My Way
 

from what i know it is still around


On 1/12/2017 5:58 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
I wonder if the software called "Text Cloner" is still around. For what it was/did, that was a cool little program!
 
Chris.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    




Question/Will NVDA Ever Have a Digits/Full Numbers Toggle?

David Goldfield
 

Hi. I'm wondering if NVDA will ever possess a toggle to switch from the
speaking of full numbers to single digits.


--
David Goldfield,
Assistive Technology Specialist

Feel free to visit my Web site
WWW.DavidGoldfield.Info


Re: whats new in 2017.1:

 

Hi,

So many under development at this time. There is a major showstopper in latest Windows 10 preview builds that prevents certain features from working as advertised in newer Windows 10 builds.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kenny Peyattt jr.
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 4:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] whats new in 2017.1:

 

Hi I wonder what features will be in 2017.1?

Kenny Peyatt jr.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


whats new in 2017.1:

Kenny Peyattt jr.
 

Hi I wonder what features will be in 2017.1?

Kenny Peyatt jr.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: OCR software?

andy.tidwell
 

Hello Chris yes text cloner is still around it is now called text cloner pro and the version I have is 11.5 and it does work with windows 10.
 
 
 

From: Christopher-Mark Gilland
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:58 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?
 
I wonder if the software called "Text Cloner" is still around. For what it was/did, that was a cool little program!
 
Chris.
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Vogel
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?
 

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

   

 

Jesus dyed for us, why can't we live for him?


Re: OCR software?

Gene New Zealand <hurrikennyandopo@...>
 

Hi


not all units come with the OCR part built into the software

My last scanner a HP did not have that function.


The unit before had the OCR softwre built into it, but none of it was accessible by a screen reader. It was a cannon.


When you do look at a new unit sometimes it says it on the box  or you might have to see if it comes with the software.


Gene nz

.


On 13/01/2017 12:42 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



-- 
<b>Check out the new location of my accessibility central website for NVDA tutorials, NVDA road tested programs, and other eyesight related topics.
http://www.accessibilitycentral.net/ If you would like to keep up to date with whats being updated on our website, you can also follow us on facebook by visiting
the following link https://en-gb.facebook.com/people/AccessibilityCentral-Net/100009727930216
Also, check out which New Zealand libraries have the NVDA screen reader available by visiting the following link http://www.aotearoapeoplesnetwork.org/content/partner-libraries


Re: OCR software?

Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 


I'm not talking about the Complete Reading System. I'm talking about just Text Cloner.
 
Anyway, do you recall how much it is? I don't want nor need it, but I'm just curious. I kind a remember it being like, $60 or something, which I agree, is quite pricey, then it seems like the Complete Reading System was like, $99, I think?
 
Chris.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 7:08 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

Yes it is. However it is very over priced for what it does.

Andrea


On 13/01/2017 10:58 AM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
I wonder if the software called "Text Cloner" is still around. For what it was/did, that was a cool little program!
 
Chris.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    




Quick Survey

Bill Dengler
 

Hello,

If you're blind or visually impaired, please take this quick survey on reading media. It's part of an internal assessment for my math class. Thanks in advance for your time! https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSenMpU1_la7wr3pq_OMIiFFiHhPTJTKYw22P0TBs0ww4kfp2w/viewform

 

Bill


Re: OCR software?

Andrea Sherry
 

Yes it is. However it is very over priced for what it does.

Andrea


On 13/01/2017 10:58 AM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
I wonder if the software called "Text Cloner" is still around. For what it was/did, that was a cool little program!
 
Chris.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    




Re: OCR software?

Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 


I wonder if the software called "Text Cloner" is still around. For what it was/did, that was a cool little program!
 
Chris.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 6:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



Re: OCR software?

 

One of the things I'm having trouble understanding here is the context or contexts for the OCR processing being discussed:

  1. At the time of scanning an actual print document on a flatbed or feeder scanner.
  2. In an existing document, such as an image scanned PDF or an actual image itself that is known to be an image of a page of text.
  3. "On the fly" in something that's an image being presented in, say, a web browser that one would like to have read.

Virtually any relatively recent, and by that I do not mean new, scanner or multi-function machine will come with an OCR engine as part of its manufacturers software suite.  Canon, HP, Kodak, and other multi-function machines I've worked with were all able to scan with OCR as part of the scan and, as it happened, their scanner control software was also accessible by screen reader.  I've been using Canon's multi-functions for years now, and even the cheapest one (read: cost about $30 ten years ago) had a software suite included with it that featured OCR as an integral part of scanning if one identified what one was scanning as a document.

I've repeatedly mentioned that Tracker Software makes two excellent free pieces of software that, while not 100% accessible, are 100% accessible for doing OCR processing on image PDFs with a remarkable level of accuracy and that also feature free language packs if you're not scanning documents in English.  See either PDF-XChange Viewer or PDF-XChange Editor.

The "on the fly" instance is one where I don't know of anything off the top of my head.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



Re: Accessible Internet Speed Test

Arlene
 

Hello, It does! It tells you your ip address and your provider. For example Concast. Or whatever you use.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kostadin Kolev
Sent: January-12-17 11:52 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Accessible Internet Speed Test

 

Hello,

Actually, I think it gives you that information too: The name of your internet service provider and your IP address - they appear one after the other. Just read the information after the link labeled "Again" after the test is done. It starts with the name and location of the server used to do the testing (the end point) - they are links. After that is the name of your internet service provider and after that - your IP address. Then there is some sort of rating information. After that are the results of your internet speed test.

______
Best wishes,
Kostadin Kolev

 

На 12.1.2017 г. в 21:04, Brandon Keith Biggs написа:

Hello,

It worked great for me! Thank you!

I would like it if it gave more information like your IP address and whatnot as well, but currently I got all I needed.

Thanks,


 

On Thu, Jan 12, 2017 at 11:01 AM, Arlene <nedster66@...> wrote:

Hi there: Does this work for all internet isps?

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kostadin Kolev
Sent: January-12-17 10:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Accessible Internet Speed Test

 

Hello,

Go to:

http://beta.speedtest.net

This is beta, but it is good enough. It is based on HTML5 technology, if I'm not mistaking. Find the link labeled "GO!" and activate it. The internet speed test will start. You'll be notified when it is completed and the results from it. But you can manually read the results on the page - find the link labeled "Again" and read the information after it - it contains the test results.

Note, that if you are using Firefox for the testing, NVDA may get a lot chatty during the test and repeat that the test is over 50% completed a lot of times. Use Internet Explorer to do the testing if you don't want to hear all that chattiness - it does not occur in it. Hmm, could this chattiness be a Firefox issue? Maybe we should report it?

______
Best wishes,
Kostadin Kolev

 

На 12.1.2017 г. в 19:15, Brandon Keith Biggs написа:

Hello,

Does anyone know of an accessible internet speed test? Most of the speed tests I have found only show speeds in a flash frame.

Thanks,

 

 

 


Re: Accessible Internet Speed Test

Gene
 

I'm not sure if I remember this correctly but as far as I know, whether things like mbps are written in capital or small letters determines what the unit of measure is.  Someone else may provide definite information.
 
Gene

Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 2:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Accessible Internet Speed Test

Sorry, they measure in bits, not bytes.  If you want bytes per second, you'll need to divide by 10 (must allow for start and stop bits for each byte) to get your speed in bytes per second.  Sorry for the confusion.  Most things mean bits when they say MBPS.  I guess bigger numbers sound better, so ...


On 1/12/2017 3:24 PM, Travis Siegel wrote:

These guys measure in bytes per second. 

You'll also likely need to round to the nearest 100.  I.E. my download came in at 27.63MBPS.  I know my download is 25 MBPS actually, so rounding to the nearest 100 would actually give me 27MBPS, but apparently I just hit a good timeframe on the network,.  On the other hand, my upload speed came in at 4.59MBPS, which I also know should be 5MBPS, so rounding to the nearest 100 would give accurate results on that one.  I'm guessing my provider doesn't optimize for uploads. :)



On 1/12/2017 1:15 PM, Kostadin Kolev wrote:

Hello,

Go to:

http://beta.speedtest.net

This is beta, but it is good enough. It is based on HTML5 technology, if I'm not mistaking. Find the link labeled "GO!" and activate it. The internet speed test will start. You'll be notified when it is completed and the results from it. But you can manually read the results on the page - find the link labeled "Again" and read the information after it - it contains the test results.

Note, that if you are using Firefox for the testing, NVDA may get a lot chatty during the test and repeat that the test is over 50% completed a lot of times. Use Internet Explorer to do the testing if you don't want to hear all that chattiness - it does not occur in it. Hmm, could this chattiness be a Firefox issue? Maybe we should report it?

______
Best wishes,
Kostadin Kolev


На 12.1.2017 г. в 19:15, Brandon Keith Biggs написа:
Hello,
Does anyone know of an accessible internet speed test? Most of the speed tests I have found only show speeds in a flash frame.
Thanks,






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Re: OCR software?

Dave Grossoehme
 

Good Afternoon: You might check out the programs link on www://jaws-users.com and see if this is the program you are looking for.
Y our Friend Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: kelby carlson
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 10:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

That isn't the PDF2TXt being referred to. The program may not be online anymore.

On 1/12/17, Doug Parisian <eggmann@...> wrote:
While slightly off topic for this list, I might end the diversion,
respectfully of course, by providing the following link for the Image to
tedxt conversion package. The assumption is that if you want to read print,

you have means of scanning it and then processing the image through the
software.

With all the programming wizzards on this list, perhaps someone can provide

a way for combo printer-scanners to integrate? Just a thought!
https://www.dropbox.com/s/9cvb52w0wfgwyqm/p2tsetup.exe?dl=1

-----Original Message-----
From: Roger Stewart
Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 10:05 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR software?

Also, can those who know the OCR engine that is use in PDF 2 TXT please
give me the link to get it or at least give me the name of the OCR
engine so I can search for it?

Thanks.

Roger











On 1/11/2017 5:59 PM, Robert Kingett wrote:
Does anyone have a link to this PDF2TXT installer? I am finding a lot of
third party installers that I am sure have adware in them. I installed
Unchecky to combat this, but still!



.







Re: Accessible Internet Speed Test

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

Sorry, they measure in bits, not bytes.  If you want bytes per second, you'll need to divide by 10 (must allow for start and stop bits for each byte) to get your speed in bytes per second.  Sorry for the confusion.  Most things mean bits when they say MBPS.  I guess bigger numbers sound better, so ...


On 1/12/2017 3:24 PM, Travis Siegel wrote:

These guys measure in bytes per second. 

You'll also likely need to round to the nearest 100.  I.E. my download came in at 27.63MBPS.  I know my download is 25 MBPS actually, so rounding to the nearest 100 would actually give me 27MBPS, but apparently I just hit a good timeframe on the network,.  On the other hand, my upload speed came in at 4.59MBPS, which I also know should be 5MBPS, so rounding to the nearest 100 would give accurate results on that one.  I'm guessing my provider doesn't optimize for uploads. :)



On 1/12/2017 1:15 PM, Kostadin Kolev wrote:

Hello,

Go to:

http://beta.speedtest.net

This is beta, but it is good enough. It is based on HTML5 technology, if I'm not mistaking. Find the link labeled "GO!" and activate it. The internet speed test will start. You'll be notified when it is completed and the results from it. But you can manually read the results on the page - find the link labeled "Again" and read the information after it - it contains the test results.

Note, that if you are using Firefox for the testing, NVDA may get a lot chatty during the test and repeat that the test is over 50% completed a lot of times. Use Internet Explorer to do the testing if you don't want to hear all that chattiness - it does not occur in it. Hmm, could this chattiness be a Firefox issue? Maybe we should report it?

______
Best wishes,
Kostadin Kolev


На 12.1.2017 г. в 19:15, Brandon Keith Biggs написа:
Hello,
Does anyone know of an accessible internet speed test? Most of the speed tests I have found only show speeds in a flash frame.
Thanks,






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Re: Accessible Internet Speed Test

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

These guys measure in bytes per second. 

You'll also likely need to round to the nearest 100.  I.E. my download came in at 27.63MBPS.  I know my download is 25 MBPS actually, so rounding to the nearest 100 would actually give me 27MBPS, but apparently I just hit a good timeframe on the network,.  On the other hand, my upload speed came in at 4.59MBPS, which I also know should be 5MBPS, so rounding to the nearest 100 would give accurate results on that one.  I'm guessing my provider doesn't optimize for uploads. :)



On 1/12/2017 1:15 PM, Kostadin Kolev wrote:

Hello,

Go to:

http://beta.speedtest.net

This is beta, but it is good enough. It is based on HTML5 technology, if I'm not mistaking. Find the link labeled "GO!" and activate it. The internet speed test will start. You'll be notified when it is completed and the results from it. But you can manually read the results on the page - find the link labeled "Again" and read the information after it - it contains the test results.

Note, that if you are using Firefox for the testing, NVDA may get a lot chatty during the test and repeat that the test is over 50% completed a lot of times. Use Internet Explorer to do the testing if you don't want to hear all that chattiness - it does not occur in it. Hmm, could this chattiness be a Firefox issue? Maybe we should report it?

______
Best wishes,
Kostadin Kolev


На 12.1.2017 г. в 19:15, Brandon Keith Biggs написа:
Hello,
Does anyone know of an accessible internet speed test? Most of the speed tests I have found only show speeds in a flash frame.
Thanks,






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