Date   

Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Yes me too The issue often is when a computer is shared with the sighted and the young.

Most of the time the things I find are not a real security risk, they normally do stuff like vector your searches via a proxy so they can track you and no doubt send you rubbish. Conduit springs to mind.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2016 4:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?


Ari,

It was never a common technique, and you only need concern yourself with it if you are suddenly being presented with a window or pop-up window that's coming up from nowhere and has no connection to anything you were doing. I don't know if there's a connection between the context menu that allows you to exit and the "Red X" exit at the upper right corner of the screen.

Seriously, if you keep your browsing hygiene even reasonably good none of these things will need to matter to you. While it's always good to know what you need to do if "the worst" happens, "the worst" seldom happens unless you're being careless to begin with.

I honestly can't remember the last time the antivirus on any of my computers quarantined anything or any of the other antispyware or antimalware programs found anything, either. I am not nearly as stringent or assiduous as some others are, as I've already noted. I am of the computing attitude, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." The metaphorical ounce of prevention is not difficult to do on a consistent basis.

I've recently posted on how to disable protected view in Microsoft Office programs. There have been times where there have been howls of protest that one simply can't and shouldn't do that. I make a note that you should do this with the proviso that you are watchful about precisely what MS-Office files you're willing to open based on knowing who and where they came from. If you know your stuff is coming from people you trust, they have security suites on their computers, it's being routed through an e-mail provider or cloud storage provider that virus scans everything, and you have your antivirus set up to scan anything you download before it gets saved on your machine then, really, how big a risk are you taking?

Brian, who believes it's about reasonable precautions, not "Cyber Fortress"


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Arianna Sepulveda
 

Do most antivirus programs automatically scan downloaded files when you start downloading them, or is this a feature you usually have to turn on? I just got Sophos, and am still getting used to it. I'd like to have a feature like this on, just in case.


Thanks, Ari

On Apr 6, 2016, at 8:37 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Ari,

         It was never a common technique, and you only need concern yourself with it if you are suddenly being presented with a window or pop-up window that's coming up from nowhere and has no connection to anything you were doing.  I don't know if there's a connection between the context menu that allows you to exit and the "Red X" exit at the upper right corner of the screen.

         Seriously, if you keep your browsing hygiene even reasonably good none of these things will need to matter to you.  While it's always good to know what you need to do if "the worst" happens, "the worst" seldom happens unless you're being careless to begin with.

         I honestly can't remember the last time the antivirus on any of my computers quarantined anything or any of the other antispyware or antimalware programs found anything, either.   I am not nearly as stringent or assiduous as some others are, as I've already noted.  I am of the computing attitude, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."  The metaphorical ounce of prevention is not difficult to do on a consistent basis.

         I've recently posted on how to disable protected view in Microsoft Office programs.  There have been times where there have been howls of protest that one simply can't and shouldn't do that.  I make a note that you should do this with the proviso that you are watchful about precisely what MS-Office files you're willing to open based on knowing who and where they came from.  If you know your stuff is coming from people you trust, they have security suites on their computers, it's being routed through an e-mail provider or cloud storage provider that virus scans everything, and you have your antivirus set up to scan anything you download before it gets saved on your machine then, really, how big a risk are you taking?

Brian, who believes it's about reasonable precautions, not "Cyber Fortress"


Re: Accessibility in Inbox by Gmail - Inbox by Gmail Help

Kevin Chao
 

I don't use Thunderbird.
I only use Inbox on web (NVDA/VoiceOver/ChromeVox), iOS VoiceOver, and Android TalkBack

On Wed, Apr 6, 2016 at 9:54 PM Afrim <afrim.maja@...> wrote:
Hello, 
Thanks for sharing this application with us. 
In terms of features and reliability, is it better than mozilla thunderbird?
Cheers.

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 7, 2016, at 3:06 AM, Kevin Chao <kevinchao89@...> wrote:


Computer accessibility

Inbox is compatible with the following screen readers:

Operating systemScreen readerBrowser
Chrome OSChromeVoxChrome
Microsoft WindowsNVDAFirefox
Mac OS X YosemiteVoiceOverSafari

When you open Inbox for the first time, Inbox provides introductory information about how to use the application. You can navigate through these introductory screens with the left and right arrow keys.

Compose and reply

To reply to an email, start typing in the Reply box below the email. To get to more options, like changing the recipients, editing quoted text, or replying inline, just expand the compose window by selecting Pop out reply Pop out reply.

Keyboard shortcuts

For the best experience, turn on keyboard shortcuts in Inbox. The following table contains some useful shortcuts. To find a complete list while you're using Inbox, hold Shift and press ? on your keyboard. Learn how to turn on keyboard shortcuts.

ShortcutAction
?Open keyboard shortcuts help
cCompose
tCreate a reminder
/Search
HomeNavigate to first item in main list
j or right arrowNavigate to next item in main list
k or left arrowNavigate to previous item in main list
nNavigate to next message in an open thread
pNavigate to previous message in an open thread
o or EnterOpen focused item
EscClose
Shift + EscFocus main window
Shift + mFocus main menu
Shift + bFocus notifications
xSelect or deselect an item in the main list
Shift + xSelect multiple items
zUndo last action
 

Tip: To improve keyboard navigation, you can make notifications stay on screen for 30 seconds. Then you can press Shift + b to navigate to the notification and take an action. To make notifications stay on the screen longer:

  1. Open Inbox.
  2. In the top left, go to the main menu Main menu.
  3. Choose Settings Settings at the bottom.
  4. Choose Other.
  5. Check the box next to "Make notifications stay on the screen longer."
  6. Select Done.


Re: Accessibility in Inbox by Gmail - Inbox by Gmail Help

afrim maja <afrim.maja@...>
 

Hello, 
Thanks for sharing this application with us. 
In terms of features and reliability, is it better than mozilla thunderbird?
Cheers.

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 7, 2016, at 3:06 AM, Kevin Chao <kevinchao89@...> wrote:


Computer accessibility

Inbox is compatible with the following screen readers:

Operating systemScreen readerBrowser
Chrome OSChromeVoxChrome
Microsoft WindowsNVDAFirefox
Mac OS X YosemiteVoiceOverSafari

When you open Inbox for the first time, Inbox provides introductory information about how to use the application. You can navigate through these introductory screens with the left and right arrow keys.

Compose and reply

To reply to an email, start typing in the Reply box below the email. To get to more options, like changing the recipients, editing quoted text, or replying inline, just expand the compose window by selecting Pop out reply Pop out reply.

Keyboard shortcuts

For the best experience, turn on keyboard shortcuts in Inbox. The following table contains some useful shortcuts. To find a complete list while you're using Inbox, hold Shift and press ? on your keyboard. Learn how to turn on keyboard shortcuts.

ShortcutAction
?Open keyboard shortcuts help
cCompose
tCreate a reminder
/Search
HomeNavigate to first item in main list
j or right arrowNavigate to next item in main list
k or left arrowNavigate to previous item in main list
nNavigate to next message in an open thread
pNavigate to previous message in an open thread
o or EnterOpen focused item
EscClose
Shift + EscFocus main window
Shift + mFocus main menu
Shift + bFocus notifications
xSelect or deselect an item in the main list
Shift + xSelect multiple items
zUndo last action
 

Tip: To improve keyboard navigation, you can make notifications stay on screen for 30 seconds. Then you can press Shift + b to navigate to the notification and take an action. To make notifications stay on the screen longer:

  1. Open Inbox.
  2. In the top left, go to the main menu Main menu.
  3. Choose Settings Settings at the bottom.
  4. Choose Other.
  5. Check the box next to "Make notifications stay on the screen longer."
  6. Select Done.


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

 

Ari,

         It was never a common technique, and you only need concern yourself with it if you are suddenly being presented with a window or pop-up window that's coming up from nowhere and has no connection to anything you were doing.  I don't know if there's a connection between the context menu that allows you to exit and the "Red X" exit at the upper right corner of the screen.

         Seriously, if you keep your browsing hygiene even reasonably good none of these things will need to matter to you.  While it's always good to know what you need to do if "the worst" happens, "the worst" seldom happens unless you're being careless to begin with.

         I honestly can't remember the last time the antivirus on any of my computers quarantined anything or any of the other antispyware or antimalware programs found anything, either.   I am not nearly as stringent or assiduous as some others are, as I've already noted.  I am of the computing attitude, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."  The metaphorical ounce of prevention is not difficult to do on a consistent basis.

         I've recently posted on how to disable protected view in Microsoft Office programs.  There have been times where there have been howls of protest that one simply can't and shouldn't do that.  I make a note that you should do this with the proviso that you are watchful about precisely what MS-Office files you're willing to open based on knowing who and where they came from.  If you know your stuff is coming from people you trust, they have security suites on their computers, it's being routed through an e-mail provider or cloud storage provider that virus scans everything, and you have your antivirus set up to scan anything you download before it gets saved on your machine then, really, how big a risk are you taking?

Brian, who believes it's about reasonable precautions, not "Cyber Fortress"


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Arianna Sepulveda
 

Holy crap! I never knew that! That's insane! Is there actually a difference between the red X and the close icon you can bring up that has minimize, maximize, Etc.? I thought that close icon was an X as well.


Thanks,
Ari

On Apr 6, 2016, at 2:35 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

To extend this to what other "computer geeks" think about good Browsing (or Computing in General) Hygiene, I'm posting a direct link to a thread entitled, Windows Defender, on bleepingcomputer.com.  Although it started out as a question about Windows Defender as an antivirus program, several regulars offered some excellent advice about computing hygiene.  One of the points I hadn't given much thought is not closing down what appear to be malicious windows using the red X at the upper right corner.  This is something a screen reader user wouldn't likely have to consider often, since most I know will use ALT+F4 to close a window, but it is an interesting point that even the normal way of dismissing a window via mouse pointer can be used as the entry point for malicious software.

By the way, the poster named usasma, who is a regular and "geek extraordinaire," also happens to be visually impaired.

Brian


Re: NVDA with iTunes.

 

iTunes worked with NVDA for me no problem. Didn't try the store but I think it is not needed for me as I mostly download apps via the iPhone's app store.


Accessibility in Inbox by Gmail - Inbox by Gmail Help

Kevin Chao
 


Computer accessibility

Inbox is compatible with the following screen readers:

Operating systemScreen readerBrowser
Chrome OSChromeVoxChrome
Microsoft WindowsNVDAFirefox
Mac OS X YosemiteVoiceOverSafari

When you open Inbox for the first time, Inbox provides introductory information about how to use the application. You can navigate through these introductory screens with the left and right arrow keys.

Compose and reply

To reply to an email, start typing in the Reply box below the email. To get to more options, like changing the recipients, editing quoted text, or replying inline, just expand the compose window by selecting Pop out reply Pop out reply.

Keyboard shortcuts

For the best experience, turn on keyboard shortcuts in Inbox. The following table contains some useful shortcuts. To find a complete list while you're using Inbox, hold Shift and press ? on your keyboard. Learn how to turn on keyboard shortcuts.

ShortcutAction
?Open keyboard shortcuts help
cCompose
tCreate a reminder
/Search
HomeNavigate to first item in main list
j or right arrowNavigate to next item in main list
k or left arrowNavigate to previous item in main list
nNavigate to next message in an open thread
pNavigate to previous message in an open thread
o or EnterOpen focused item
EscClose
Shift + EscFocus main window
Shift + mFocus main menu
Shift + bFocus notifications
xSelect or deselect an item in the main list
Shift + xSelect multiple items
zUndo last action
 

Tip: To improve keyboard navigation, you can make notifications stay on screen for 30 seconds. Then you can press Shift + b to navigate to the notification and take an action. To make notifications stay on the screen longer:

  1. Open Inbox.
  2. In the top left, go to the main menu Main menu.
  3. Choose Settings Settings at the bottom.
  4. Choose Other.
  5. Check the box next to "Make notifications stay on the screen longer."
  6. Select Done.


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

 

Antony,

         How are you receiving e-mail, and by that I mean are you getting each message, the full featured digest, or the plain digest?  In reviewing copies of both the full featured digest and plain digest a clickable link is presented.  In the full-featured it's in an HTML e-mail and a direct "typical" click-through.  In the plain it appears that the click through text is separated out and the URL placed in angle brackets next to it.

Brian


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Kwork
 

Click on the words, "Windows Defender." That brought up, for me, the forum
topic.
Travis

----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <Antony.Stone@nvda.open.source.it>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2016 2:39 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how
accessible?


Sounds interesting, but where's the link?

On Wednesday 06 April 2016 at 23:35:28, Brian Vogel wrote:

I'm posting a direct link to a thread entitled, Windows Defender, on
bleepingcomputer.com.

Antony.

--
If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it,
we'd be so simple that we couldn't.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC
me.


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Antony Stone
 

Thanks for the info, but that link didn't come through on my copy of the
email.

Did anyone else who uses this list via email get a clickable link?


Antony.

On Thursday 07 April 2016 at 00:04:41, Brian Vogel wrote:

Antony,

The link is right in the original post after the word "entitled."
I always use click-through text whenever possible.

Brian, who - having in brain injury rehab - could not agree more with your
signature quote
--
God sent his only son into this world to be crucified.

Christian parents may wish to reflect upon this as a role model.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

 

Antony,

          The link is right in the original post after the word "entitled."  I always use click-through text whenever possible.

Brian, who - having in brain injury rehab - could not agree more with your signature quote


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Gene
 

I didn't read the discussion but this appears to be the advice that was circulated a number of years ago that, if a program asks to install something and you think the site is malicious, telling the browser or window to close will cause it to install what it is asking you about even though you didn't give permission.  The browser should be closed from the task manager or perhaps, I'm not sure, by shutting down the computer, perhaps with an improper shutdown.  But the issue wasn't using the close icon or not.  It was that closing the browser in any standard way tells the malicious site to install the malware. 
 
If I weren't going to use the task manager to shut down the browser, I would do an improper shutdown and not take a chance on initiating a proper shutdown, unless I had researched this and knew that a proper shutdown was safe.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2016 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

To extend this to what other "computer geeks" think about good Browsing (or Computing in General) Hygiene, I'm posting a direct link to a thread entitled, Windows Defender, on bleepingcomputer.com.  Although it started out as a question about Windows Defender as an antivirus program, several regulars offered some excellent advice about computing hygiene.  One of the points I hadn't given much thought is not closing down what appear to be malicious windows using the red X at the upper right corner.  This is something a screen reader user wouldn't likely have to consider often, since most I know will use ALT+F4 to close a window, but it is an interesting point that even the normal way of dismissing a window via mouse pointer can be used as the entry point for malicious software.

By the way, the poster named usasma, who is a regular and "geek extraordinaire," also happens to be visually impaired.

Brian


FW: [NvDACon-announce] FW: [NVDACon] You are invited: NVDACon 2016 preview open forum, April 8, 2016

 

 

 

From: Joseph Lee [mailto:joseph.lee22590@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 6, 2016 2:55 PM
To: NvDACon-announce@groups.io
Subject: [NvDACon-announce] FW: [NVDACon] You are invited: NVDACon 2016 preview open forum, April 8, 2016

 

 

 

From: Joseph Lee [mailto:joseph.lee22590@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 6, 2016 2:54 PM
To: NVDACon@groups.io
Subject: [NVDACon] You are invited: NVDACon 2016 preview open forum, April 8, 2016

 

Dear members of the NVDA community, NVDACon members, presenters and others:

 

You are cordially invited to attend the next chapter in NVDACon planning: preview open forum, to be held on April 8, 2016 at the actual NVDACon conference site (NVDA Korea TeamTalk channel). This meeting, to be held over two sessions, will let you see the glimpse of how NVDACon planning is going, as well as to receive last minute input before the conference promotion begins next week. This meeting will also be used as an opportunity for presenters to network with each other, to finalize the conference schedule and to invite NVDA community members to start preparing for this conference via promotions, testimony submissions and so on.

 

Event details:

·         Date: April 8, 2016

·         Location: NVDA Korea TeamTalk channel (nvda-kr.org; be sure to follow directions posted at http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/nvdacon.php).

·         First meeting: 01:00 UTC (6 PM Pacific (April 7th), 9 PM Eastern and elsewhere).

·         Second meeting: 17:00 UTC (10 AM Pacific (April 8th), 1 PM Eastern and elsewhere).

·         The second meeting will be held for those who couldn’t make it to the first one (we recommend everyone (especially presenters) to attend the first meeting). For best experience, please install TeamTalk 5.1 or later and have a microphone handy.

·         Note that this isn’t part of NVDACon - we’ll decide the overall schedule, including when to hold the first session during this preview open forum.

 

Previously, all NVDACon planning meetings were for NVDACon members, but we believe that it’s time to report to the community as to how we’re doing. This meeting will also serve as a venue to discuss tenth anniversary events scheduled for the rest of the year and to give planners of our next big NVDACon (international) a chance to get together and start planning.

 

In regards to conference schedule: once the schedule is finalized, a press release will be sent throughout the community (including to local NVDA communities) via email and social media.

 

Hope the see you at the preview open forum.

Sincerely,

Joseph S. Lee

Chair, NVDA Tenth Anniversary Planning Committee

 


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Antony Stone
 

Sounds interesting, but where's the link?

On Wednesday 06 April 2016 at 23:35:28, Brian Vogel wrote:

I'm posting a direct link to a thread entitled, Windows Defender, on
bleepingcomputer.com.

Antony.

--
If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it,
we'd be so simple that we couldn't.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Good Browsing Hygiene, was: Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

 

To extend this to what other "computer geeks" think about good Browsing (or Computing in General) Hygiene, I'm posting a direct link to a thread entitled, Windows Defender, on bleepingcomputer.com.  Although it started out as a question about Windows Defender as an antivirus program, several regulars offered some excellent advice about computing hygiene.  One of the points I hadn't given much thought is not closing down what appear to be malicious windows using the red X at the upper right corner.  This is something a screen reader user wouldn't likely have to consider often, since most I know will use ALT+F4 to close a window, but it is an interesting point that even the normal way of dismissing a window via mouse pointer can be used as the entry point for malicious software.

By the way, the poster named usasma, who is a regular and "geek extraordinaire," also happens to be visually impaired.

Brian


Re: How do I check a check box?

Kevin Cussick
 

well yes, agreed but for this user it didn't work.

On 06/04/2016 03:59, nasrin khaksar wrote:
hi.
i tested both libreoffice open office and space works for me well.
i can use space and check uncheck any item that i want.

On 4/6/16, Kevin Cussick via Groups.io
<the.big.white.shepherd=googlemail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Nvda and enter should do it.

On 05/04/2016 22:43, Brian Vogel wrote:
Erik,

What version of Open Office?

I have Libre Office, Open Office, and Microsoft Office 2010
on my machine. If the form in question is downloadable, or you have a
blank version, you can feel free to e-mail it to me and I'll see what I
can do to activate a checkbox using NVDA 2016.1.

If you're a mouse user typically a left mouse click on a
checkbox acts as a toggle. You might want to get focus on the checkbox
object and hit Num Pad Divide (desktop keyboard layout) or NVDA+[ (laptop
keyboard layout) to see if it has the same effect. The spacebar and enter
work in the context of web browsing, but I think that may be the only
context where that works.

Brian



Re: regarding elequence

afrim maja <afrim.maja@...>
 

what do you mean by eloquence voices? There is a sappy 5 eloquence from codefactory which supports also chinese, japonese, and Korean. Are you talking about that?.

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 6, 2016, at 5:59 PM, Ravi Paswan <ravipaswan32@gmail.com> wrote:

hello gang
any can provide to me sapi 5 ETI elequence microsoft voices.



regarding elequence

Ravi Paswan <ravipaswan32@...>
 

hello gang
any can provide to me sapi 5 ETI elequence microsoft voices.


Re: NvdA-add-on for skype7

Chris Mullins
 

Hi Paul
Skype seems very accessible without any add-ons. The alt 1 you mentioned is
a shortcut on the view menu which enables you to switch on/off the display
of the Contacts list in the main window which you can just tab to, the
majority of the menu items have accelerator keys and you can display a list
of actions for a contact using the applications key.

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: P. Otter [mailto:pam.otter@gmail.com]
Sent: 06 April 2016 14:46
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NvdA-add-on for skype7

hi,
i've installed it, but removed after a few seconds, because the
accessibility was rather less.
the shortcuts don't work anymore like alt 1 or aalt 2 for the contacts and
the last used contacts.
so it is not recommendable to install this plugin.
cheers
paul otter

----- Original Message -----
From: "Георги Ламбов" <obichamlegiona@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2016 3:37 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NvdA-add-on for skype7



Well, I had problems with skype talking and I thought, I can use this
add-on but if it isn't up-to-date,I really don't need it. I've found
version 1.0 or so but I thought there's any new version. So, thank you for
the information.
Cheers!
Georgi
На 6.4.2016 г. в 08:27 ч., Shaun Everiss написа:
Well you don't need an addon for skype now anyway.
That addon is really old now I actually remember when it was discussed,
eventually a lot of these addons get out of date but if they are good
enough they become part of core and then are not needed.



On 6/04/2016 12:37 p.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,

Isn't this the one I said it had security issues? If this is the case, I
stand by what I wrote a few months ago: this Skype add-on was
blacklisted by the add-ons community for causing issues when NVDA quits.
Besides this Skype add-on, two other add-ons are blacklisted or
development was suspended: Google Speech Recognition and Instant
Translate due to changes implemented by Google.

Cheers,

Joseph

Community add-ons reviewer and (soon to retire) quarterly add-on release
coordinator, NVDA screen reader project





From: Governor staten [mailto:govsta@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, April 5, 2016 5:02 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NvdA-add-on for skype7



That add-on is probably very old. That is just my guess, but, a good
one.







On 4/5/2016 3:09 PM, Ksenia Natapova via Groups.io wrote:

Hello,

I've found the add on here:

http://jeff.tdrealms.com/Add-Ons/Skype7.nvda-addon



Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Am 05.04.2016 um 21:00 schrieb Георги Ламбов <obichamlegiona@gmail.com
<mailto:obichamlegiona@gmail.com> >:

Hi people!
I decided it will be good to use NvdA-add-on for skype7. I've found a
very good explanation for the add-on but on this website I couldn't find
link for downloading this add-on. Recommend me please a good place for
download of the latest final version of this add-on! Thanks in advance!
Cheers!
Georgi

---
Този имейл е проверен за вируси от Avast.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus










---
Този имейл е проверен за вируси от Avast.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus