Date   

System restore

Chris Shook <chris0309@...>
 

Hi,
I have a quick question.
I recently tried to perform a system restore and I got the following method.
"System restore did not complete successfully. System restore could not restore the directory at the restore point."
I have tried to contact Microsoft, but I seem to be lead around and in circles.
I am currently running Windows 10 version 1703 OS build 15063.
Would NVDA cause this issue? I've had the same problem on two different computers.
Is anyone else having this problem?
I am sorry for posting here, but I didn't know where else to turn.
Thanks
Chris


Re: .pdf readers

John Hedges
 

I use Edge pdf view. It works with accessible files. This is part of Windows 10 latest release.

 

Files generated by Office365 2016 work as accessible pdf.

 

John

 

From: George McCoy
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 4:33 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] .pdf readers

 

Is there a pdf reader other than Adobe Reader that works with NVDA?  I need one that preserves the document format including indentions.
Visual inspection of the documents in Adobe Reader reveals that they contain indented lines but NVDA says that all lines are at the left margin.
I converted the document to various formats with three different converters and in no case does the output show indented lines.
 
Thanks very much,
George


.pdf readers

George McCoy <slr1bpz@...>
 

Is there a pdf reader other than Adobe Reader that works with NVDA?  I need one that preserves the document format including indentions.
Visual inspection of the documents in Adobe Reader reveals that they contain indented lines but NVDA says that all lines are at the left margin.
I converted the document to various formats with three different converters and in no case does the output show indented lines.
 
Thanks very much,
George


Re: using physical mouse with nvda?

Michael Capelle <mcapelle@...>
 

totally agree, no need for a rodent here.
 

Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 3:17 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] using physical mouse with nvda?
 

Hi, Gene,

 

I agree with you here. If a blind person can learn to navigate by using keyboard commands, then he or she should be able to get a job done more quickly and efficiently. For example, I sometimes listen to a station called the legend. I know where the listen link is so I just do the find command and type "listen" in the edit box and hit enter. I frankly don't see what the purpose is for learning to use a physical mouse when you can do mouse equivilents using the keyboard. After all, we're not sighted.

 

Rosemarie

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 11:56 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] using physical mouse with nvda?

 

I don't know how efficient a mouse, used by a blind person, is in that circumstance.  But I question your assertion that it is more efficient than looking at the site skillfully using the keyboard.  You don't have to lookk at those top links.  One of the most important skilss for blind people to use the Internet skillfully is to skip them using headings or using the skip blocks of links command.  Also, if you have an idea what you are looking for, you can use find to search for a word you think would be likely or very likely to be on a page that deals with what you are looking for.  On pages I've never looked at before, I often am interested in the text below the links that are shown at the top.  I've seen blind people and read comments by blind people who waste enormous amounts of time tabbing through links or using the links list when techniques such as I've mentioned would be far better to use.  I haven't used a physical mouse but from my years of experience using the keyboard to navigate web pages I'm skeptical that its as or more efficient to use a mouse to find content or get an overview of the page.  then, too, there is the ability to skim by moving by paragraph on the main text of a page and reading the first or part of the first sentence of any paragraph desired.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 1:35 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] using physical mouse with nvda?

 

Well, I'll disagree that it's pointless for someone who's totally blind to use the mouse with NVDA (or their finger on a laptop or all-in-one touch screen) to get a "quick and dirty" idea of what's on a given screen, particularly a webpage.

I've used that concept with a number of my clients who are trying to do web research and need to make quick decisions about whether a given webpage is something they need to dig in to further or can just chuck and move along to the next thing.  You can very often get a very good idea, and very quickly, about what's on a page using mouse navigation that's far more tedious to accomplish by looking at, say, the list of links on a page, of which there are always scads more "junk links" than content links and that a screen reader has to present, but that are strategically placed on a screen, usually at the very top margin or very bottom
--
Brian  - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            ~ Niels Bohr

 

 


Re: using physical mouse with nvda?

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Gene,

 

I agree with you here. If a blind person can learn to navigate by using keyboard commands, then he or she should be able to get a job done more quickly and efficiently. For example, I sometimes listen to a station called the legend. I know where the listen link is so I just do the find command and type "listen" in the edit box and hit enter. I frankly don't see what the purpose is for learning to use a physical mouse when you can do mouse equivilents using the keyboard. After all, we're not sighted.

 

Rosemarie

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 11:56 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] using physical mouse with nvda?

 

I don't know how efficient a mouse, used by a blind person, is in that circumstance.  But I question your assertion that it is more efficient than looking at the site skillfully using the keyboard.  You don't have to lookk at those top links.  One of the most important skilss for blind people to use the Internet skillfully is to skip them using headings or using the skip blocks of links command.  Also, if you have an idea what you are looking for, you can use find to search for a word you think would be likely or very likely to be on a page that deals with what you are looking for.  On pages I've never looked at before, I often am interested in the text below the links that are shown at the top.  I've seen blind people and read comments by blind people who waste enormous amounts of time tabbing through links or using the links list when techniques such as I've mentioned would be far better to use.  I haven't used a physical mouse but from my years of experience using the keyboard to navigate web pages I'm skeptical that its as or more efficient to use a mouse to find content or get an overview of the page.  then, too, there is the ability to skim by moving by paragraph on the main text of a page and reading the first or part of the first sentence of any paragraph desired.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 1:35 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] using physical mouse with nvda?

 

Well, I'll disagree that it's pointless for someone who's totally blind to use the mouse with NVDA (or their finger on a laptop or all-in-one touch screen) to get a "quick and dirty" idea of what's on a given screen, particularly a webpage.

I've used that concept with a number of my clients who are trying to do web research and need to make quick decisions about whether a given webpage is something they need to dig in to further or can just chuck and move along to the next thing.  You can very often get a very good idea, and very quickly, about what's on a page using mouse navigation that's far more tedious to accomplish by looking at, say, the list of links on a page, of which there are always scads more "junk links" than content links and that a screen reader has to present, but that are strategically placed on a screen, usually at the very top margin or very bottom
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Re: NVDA and the Online Bible

Jim Noseworthy
 

Hello:

Thanks: I know about Bible Gateway but my client is looking for an NVDA compatible off-line Bible.

Cheers.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Laurie Mehta via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 3:48 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible

There are many options but here is one that I have no difficulty using-- and I use NVDA excluseively...
(I copied the title bar and address for you-- I use firefox.)

BibleGateway.com: A searchable online Bible in over 150 versions and 50 languages. - Mozilla Firefox

https://www.biblegateway.com/

-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 7/19/17, Jim Noseworthy <jim.noseworthy@...> wrote:

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Wednesday, July 19, 2017, 11:23 AM

Hi Gang: Is there an NVDA add-on for
the Online Bible? If not, can anyone recommend a good off-line Bible that would work with NVDA? Thanks all over the place gang.


Re: NVDA and the Online Bible

Jim Noseworthy
 

Hello:

 

That’s the program I’m talking about by Larry Pearce.

 

Cheers.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Leonard de Ruijter
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 4:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible

 

Hey Jim,

 

It turns out I was wrong, I have experience with an Online Bible, but it is the program from http://www.onlinebible.org/ . This application worked quite Ok with JAWS and SUperNova in the past.

 

Let me know whether this is a suitable alternative for you.

 

Regards,

Leonard

 

On 20-7-2017 12:40, Jim Noseworthy wrote:

Hey Leonard:

 

Thanks all over the place.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Leonard de Ruijter
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 1:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible

 

Hey,

 

I will try to investigate this in the weekend. As JAWS is able to read stuff from it just fine (and I was able to operate it using SuperNova as well), it shouldn't be that hard.


Regards,
Leonard

On 19-7-2017 22:03, Jim Noseworthy wrote:

 

I am the JAWS support person for Online Bible but I have a client who wishes to use NVDA. It just doesn’t work with NVDA.

 

Cheers.

.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Leonard de Ruijter
Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 4:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible

 

Hello,

 

I've been working with online Bible a lot in the past, however that was back when I was using JAWS. Is there a particular reason why you belief you're in need of an add-on?


Regards,
Leonard

On 19-7-2017 21:01, Ron Canazzi wrote:

Bible Seeker from the below address is very good with NVDA.  The site has over a dozen bible translations and the search is accessible.  They say the latest version is 2.03 from 2017. I don't know why that is.  I have 2.03 from 2015.  I would assume it's the same program.  The size for download is the same.

http://bible_seeker.en.downloadastro.com/

 

 

On 7/19/2017 2:23 PM, Jim Noseworthy wrote:

Hi Gang:

 

Is there an NVDA add-on for the Online Bible?  If not, can anyone recommend a good off-line Bible that would work with NVDA?

 

Thanks all over the place gang.

 

 





--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

 

 

 


Re: describing symbols

Gene
 

I saw the messages about imogees (spelling) and that may be a cause as well.  But I've also seen descriptions as a part of web pages or html newsletters that are written out on the page for blind people.  They are, I'm sure, writing using something like black on black contrast so a sighted person won't see them but they provide no useful information.
 
Gene

------ Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 2:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] describing symbols

If the exact same description occurs in message after message and if it interferes with reading text efficiently, you can try copying the exact text to the clipboard and then using the speech dictionary to cause the phrase not to be spoken.  I did that in HTML e-mails that said nonsense like curved line in every e-mail and other such nonsense. 
 
When people take blindness accessibility recommendations seriously for Internet sites with no understanding of them, all sorts of nonsense may result such as something like the description curved line being placed on the site.. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Don H
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 1:48 PM
Subject: [nvda] describing symbols

How do you get NVDA to stop describing symbols?  For example within a
Email sighted help tells me that there is a symbol that looks like a
sun.  NVDA reads it as Black Sun with Rays.




Re: using physical mouse with nvda?

Gene
 

That may be in terms of how people work with web pages.  But I'm not sure what your second comment is saying.  It may be that some people who have seen before may be better able to picture what they are doing when using a mouse but I'm not sure if that is what you are saying and I think its better to try to teach efficient keyboard navigation first to see how well people do with it.  I don't look on imitating or accomodating to the sighted organization of web pages to be a good general measure of whether a technique is a good one. Being blind means that for accomplishing some tasks, techniques that have no relation to a sighted users techniques will be far more efficient.   
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] using physical mouse with nvda?

 Gene,

         You would do well to understand that you are an outlier on the high end of the bell curve of efficient screen reader use and skill set (and this is not a bad thing).  But that is what you are, and your skills are not necessarily transferable to all other screen reader users.  We've had this discussion before, as I try to teach a lot of the things you advocate but there are a lot of folks who just can't or won't (and I'd say it's more often the latter) absorb them, particularly if they're not something that they need to use on a routine basis.

          There is, as the old saying goes (and BTW, I love cats, so I don't do this) "more than one way to skin a cat."  For some people the keyboard will be their one and only chosen technique and they'll get really, really efficient with it.   Others stay in pretty much "brute force tabbing" mode long after they've been taught how to avoid it and have even demonstrated that they can avoid it, they simply choose not to.

           That latter group is far better served, when circumstances permit, by using mouse tracing to their advantage.

           The other thing I can say is, that as someone who sees and scans pages visually, what can (not always is, but can) be accomplished via disciplined use of mouse tracking comes much closer to imitating that process, which is what the medium is designed for, than the hierarchical method imposed by keyboard use of screen readers, no matter how skillfully used from the keyboard.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Re: describing symbols

 

It could be Webdings, too.

It's a thorny decision to not describe emojis, emoticons, or things like webdings.   They get used in many instances to convey something the text itself might not.  Then again, there are people who pepper their communications with them such that they are, to most of us, just garbage.  There's no AI that can yet fathom which situation might be which.

--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Re: Error message

Darrin Reid
 

I don't want to use this voice. I am simply trying to get back to the default settings. Can you tell me how to get back to the default settings when I can't bring up the interface?

Darrin Reid

On Jul 20, 2017, at 12:07 PM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

Control NVDA key r doesn't open anything.  If you have changed settings in NVDA and not permanently saved the changes, control NVDA key r reverts NVDA to the permanently saved settings.
 
I don't know what voice you are using now.  Assumedly, since the voice you are trying to use isn't being allowed to run, the voice now in your permanently saved settings is reading the message.  Control NVDA key r only might help if, for some reason, you tried to load a voice and it didn't load properly, resulting in you loosing speech.  Since you hadn't yet made the new voice permanent, control NVDA key r would revert to the old voice because it reverts to the permanently saved settings. 
 
The first answer said that if the voice is restricted, only allowed to read with a certain program, then you can't use it with NVDA.  Is this an unrestricted voice that you purchased to be able to run with any program that can run it?  If so, considering the lack of responses, it sounds as though its time to call technical support.  You may have to go into the actual voice program itself and authorize it.  It sounds as though you are ggetting an error message that the voice needs to be authorized but it's just an error message.  It doesn't offer fields you can use to authorize the voice.  it is just an information message about what the problem is.  That's how it sounds to me.  You may need to call techhnical support to verify that and find out how to authorize the voice from within the voice software. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 10:48 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Error message

Do you have any other suggestions? I tried what you said, but it did not work. Every time I hit any key, the error message window keeps popping open. When I click the, OK button, on the window, it eventually goes away. No matter how quickly I hit the NVDA+ctrl+r, it will not open up the interface window.

Darrin Reid

On Jul 19, 2017, at 8:50 PM, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:

Hi Darrin,

It sounds like you are trying to use a TTS voice which is licensed to another program?  NVDA will let you use any standard SAPI TTS and many others, but some voices are locked to specific programs.  If you are trying to use a TTS voice you got with another program, it may not work with NVDA, even though NVDA will let you select it.  In that case, you need to choose another voice.  If you get stuck, press NVDA+control+r to restore the saved configuration or NVDA+control+r three times quickly to restore NVDA to factory default settings (note that uninstalling and reinstalling NVDA won't fix this as the configuration settings are not deleted).

Regards

Quentin.

On Thu, Jul 20, 2017 at 5:57 AM, Darrin Reid via Groups.Io <dkr1717@...> wrote:
This is the error message that I am getting. It is preventing me from using the application. I am working on a windows 10 desktop. How do I fix the following message.
"you need a password to use this true voice speech

Once I click on the, OK button, I never get the opportunity to put in a password. Every time I launch the program, this is the error message that I keep getting. Please, help! engine"

Darrin Reid






--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: describing symbols

Gene
 

If the exact same description occurs in message after message and if it interferes with reading text efficiently, you can try copying the exact text to the clipboard and then using the speech dictionary to cause the phrase not to be spoken.  I did that in HTML e-mails that said nonsense like curved line in every e-mail and other such nonsense. 
 
When people take blindness accessibility recommendations seriously for Internet sites with no understanding of them, all sorts of nonsense may result such as something like the description curved line being placed on the site.. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Don H
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 1:48 PM
Subject: [nvda] describing symbols

How do you get NVDA to stop describing symbols?  For example within a
Email sighted help tells me that there is a symbol that looks like a
sun.  NVDA reads it as Black Sun with Rays.




Re: using physical mouse with nvda?

 

 Gene,

         You would do well to understand that you are an outlier on the high end of the bell curve of efficient screen reader use and skill set (and this is not a bad thing).  But that is what you are, and your skills are not necessarily transferable to all other screen reader users.  We've had this discussion before, as I try to teach a lot of the things you advocate but there are a lot of folks who just can't or won't (and I'd say it's more often the latter) absorb them, particularly if they're not something that they need to use on a routine basis.

          There is, as the old saying goes (and BTW, I love cats, so I don't do this) "more than one way to skin a cat."  For some people the keyboard will be their one and only chosen technique and they'll get really, really efficient with it.   Others stay in pretty much "brute force tabbing" mode long after they've been taught how to avoid it and have even demonstrated that they can avoid it, they simply choose not to.

           That latter group is far better served, when circumstances permit, by using mouse tracing to their advantage.

           The other thing I can say is, that as someone who sees and scans pages visually, what can (not always is, but can) be accomplished via disciplined use of mouse tracking comes much closer to imitating that process, which is what the medium is designed for, than the hierarchical method imposed by keyboard use of screen readers, no matter how skillfully used from the keyboard.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Re: NVDA and the Online Bible

Leonard de Ruijter
 

Hey Jim,


It turns out I was wrong, I have experience with an Online Bible, but it is the program from http://www.onlinebible.org/ . This application worked quite Ok with JAWS and SUperNova in the past.


Let me know whether this is a suitable alternative for you.


Regards,

Leonard


On 20-7-2017 12:40, Jim Noseworthy wrote:

Hey Leonard:

 

Thanks all over the place.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Leonard de Ruijter
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 1:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible

 

Hey,

 

I will try to investigate this in the weekend. As JAWS is able to read stuff from it just fine (and I was able to operate it using SuperNova as well), it shouldn't be that hard.


Regards,
Leonard

On 19-7-2017 22:03, Jim Noseworthy wrote:

 

I am the JAWS support person for Online Bible but I have a client who wishes to use NVDA. It just doesn’t work with NVDA.

 

Cheers.

.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Leonard de Ruijter
Sent: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 4:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible

 

Hello,

 

I've been working with online Bible a lot in the past, however that was back when I was using JAWS. Is there a particular reason why you belief you're in need of an add-on?


Regards,
Leonard

On 19-7-2017 21:01, Ron Canazzi wrote:

Bible Seeker from the below address is very good with NVDA.  The site has over a dozen bible translations and the search is accessible.  They say the latest version is 2.03 from 2017. I don't know why that is.  I have 2.03 from 2015.  I would assume it's the same program.  The size for download is the same.

http://bible_seeker.en.downloadastro.com/

 

 

On 7/19/2017 2:23 PM, Jim Noseworthy wrote:

Hi Gang:

 

Is there an NVDA add-on for the Online Bible?  If not, can anyone recommend a good off-line Bible that would work with NVDA?

 

Thanks all over the place gang.

 

 




--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

 

 



Re: describing symbols

Andre Fisher
 

This is because you are using a synthesizer that recognises emoji. At
present, NVDA, and other screen readers, do not give you control of
reporting these. It is rather synth specific.

On 7/20/17, Don H <lmddh50@...> wrote:
How do you get NVDA to stop describing symbols? For example within a
Email sighted help tells me that there is a symbol that looks like a
sun. NVDA reads it as Black Sun with Rays.





Re: using physical mouse with nvda?

Gene
 

I don't know how efficient a mouse, used by a blind person, is in that circumstance.  But I question your assertion that it is more efficient than looking at the site skillfully using the keyboard.  You don't have to lookk at those top links.  One of the most important skilss for blind people to use the Internet skillfully is to skip them using headings or using the skip blocks of links command.  Also, if you have an idea what you are looking for, you can use find to search for a word you think would be likely or very likely to be on a page that deals with what you are looking for.  On pages I've never looked at before, I often am interested in the text below the links that are shown at the top.  I've seen blind people and read comments by blind people who waste enormous amounts of time tabbing through links or using the links list when techniques such as I've mentioned would be far better to use.  I haven't used a physical mouse but from my years of experience using the keyboard to navigate web pages I'm skeptical that its as or more efficient to use a mouse to find content or get an overview of the page.  then, too, there is the ability to skim by moving by paragraph on the main text of a page and reading the first or part of the first sentence of any paragraph desired.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 20, 2017 1:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] using physical mouse with nvda?

Well, I'll disagree that it's pointless for someone who's totally blind to use the mouse with NVDA (or their finger on a laptop or all-in-one touch screen) to get a "quick and dirty" idea of what's on a given screen, particularly a webpage.

I've used that concept with a number of my clients who are trying to do web research and need to make quick decisions about whether a given webpage is something they need to dig in to further or can just chuck and move along to the next thing.  You can very often get a very good idea, and very quickly, about what's on a page using mouse navigation that's far more tedious to accomplish by looking at, say, the list of links on a page, of which there are always scads more "junk links" than content links and that a screen reader has to present, but that are strategically placed on a screen, usually at the very top margin or very bottom
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


describing symbols

Don H
 

How do you get NVDA to stop describing symbols? For example within a Email sighted help tells me that there is a symbol that looks like a sun. NVDA reads it as Black Sun with Rays.


Re: NVDA and the Online Bible

Laurie Mehta
 

There are many options but here is one that I have no difficulty using-- and I use NVDA excluseively...
(I copied the title bar and address for you-- I use firefox.)

BibleGateway.com: A searchable online Bible in over 150 versions and 50 languages. - Mozilla Firefox

https://www.biblegateway.com/

-LM

--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 7/19/17, Jim Noseworthy <jim.noseworthy@...> wrote:

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and the Online Bible
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Wednesday, July 19, 2017, 11:23 AM

Hi Gang:  Is there an NVDA add-on for
the Online Bible?  If not, can anyone recommend a good
off-line Bible that would work with NVDA?  Thanks all over the place
gang.


Re: using physical mouse with nvda?

 

And that last message should have said "mouse tracking" rather than "mouse navigation," though if you land on a button or link you want to follow you can, if you so choose, just click.

This generally works much better with either a mouse pad or a touch screen than a real mouse on a conventional monitor, but even that can work once you get the hang of it.   Not everyone, or even the majority, will want to bother but it's worth giving a try.  Now JAWS is also doing the equivalent of mouse tracking in JAWS 18.
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Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Re: using physical mouse with nvda?

 

Well, I'll disagree that it's pointless for someone who's totally blind to use the mouse with NVDA (or their finger on a laptop or all-in-one touch screen) to get a "quick and dirty" idea of what's on a given screen, particularly a webpage.

I've used that concept with a number of my clients who are trying to do web research and need to make quick decisions about whether a given webpage is something they need to dig in to further or can just chuck and move along to the next thing.  You can very often get a very good idea, and very quickly, about what's on a page using mouse navigation that's far more tedious to accomplish by looking at, say, the list of links on a page, of which there are always scads more "junk links" than content links and that a screen reader has to present, but that are strategically placed on a screen, usually at the very top margin or very bottom
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Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr