Date   

Re: TWBlue stopped working, please help?

Pauline Smith
 

I have had TWBlue installed for about a month now. It works pretty well. I did have the problem of not launching from the desktop after it updated. I happen to see a tweet about the extra characters and how to get rid of them. I followed the instructions and all is well now. I definitely prefer using blue over working from Twitter's site (even the mobile one).

On 4/18/2016 6:05 PM, Scott VanDeWalle wrote:
Hello.
I used to have both twblue and chicken nugget.
I got rid of TWblue, but i still have chicken nugget.
The thing is, sometimes one app will work and one won't.
Nugget is us d 15$.
If you can make it work, chicken nugget seems to work pretty good from the invisible interface.
It works the other way too but it seems somewhat more sluggish at times.
hth

Scott

On 4/17/2016 11:23 PM, Lisa P Geibel wrote:
Hi,
I know I've heard about people with this program and it not working. I even went through the time when extra characters were added to the twblue.exe file, but this is not the case now. We've uninstalled and reinstalled the latest version, but still nothing. Restarted the computer and still nothing. Tried hitting enter on the desktop icon for the program, tried running it as administrator with the context key, tried loading it from the twblue.exe icon in the program files folder and still nothing. Does anyone have any ideas or should we really say a final farewell to this great program? We're running Windows 10 with the latest build of NVDA and also have the latest version of JAWS, but it won't work that way either. Any ideas or help would be greatly appreciated? Thanks.



Re: Brian's comments about WinXP, and I've changed the subject line.

Laurie Mehta
 

Hi Brian,
I realize that some people hate change and that's where the discussion ends for them but there is at least one aspect of Windows XP that I preferred to what came after...
That is the file organization, and how straightforward it was to organize files in meaningful folders and access files saved in folders keeping a library neat and manageable.
For me, the file organization and file accessibility in Win7 and later are usable but not preferable. JMHO.
(smile)
Thanks for all that you contribute here. It's appreciated.
-LM

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 4/18/16, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [nvda] This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory
To: nvda@groups.io
Date: Monday, April 18, 2016, 6:27 PM

Rosemarie Chavarria
wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted on staying
with WinXP, "I asked him
why and his answer was that it was simpler to work
with."And I can't count the times
I've heard this, about way more than Windows, and
thought, "No, it's not easier to work with -
it's what you're used to."  Win XP was an OS I
loved and Microsoft has the annoying habit of alternating
"good" and "bad" versions of Windows.
 The number of things that require manual intervention from
the user in XP is huge compared to later versions,
particularly Windows 7 forward.  And, when it comes down to
it, even in the "ugly" versions of Windows the
similarities to their predecessors is at least as strong as
the differences, but the differences are where people are
required to learn something new.David Moore's comments
regarding those who live to be 100, or near it, really
resonate with me.  My grandmother died in the 1990s and was
in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology
was at her birth and the amount of change she and her age
cohort had to go through I am amazed.  I don't know if
I could be as flexible as they were.  While the pace of
change has picked up, particularly in the cyber world, the
majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just
short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements
on very familiar themes rather than complete divergences
from what came before.  That was not true for my
grandparents at all, and my parents experienced more
revolutionary changes than I have, too.  I think my only
two revolutions were the introduction of the personal
computer and the ascendance of the
internet.Brian


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

I'm wondering the same thing.

-----Original Message-----
From: Hank Smith, and Seeing-eye dog Iona [mailto:hank.smith966@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2016 4:22 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

you mean it runs on windows 3.1?
oh my
how good does it run?

On 4/18/2016 4:11 PM, Carlos wrote:


Hello Again:

A description of my PC:




*Packard Bell Legend V

*386SX 16MHz Processor

*125 Megabyte Hard Disk

*EGA Video Card

*14 Inch Monitor

*Sound Blaster I Sound Card

*101 PS/2 Keyboard/Logitech Three Button Mouse w/Rubber Ball on Bottom


*Windows 3.11/MS DOS 6.22

*Norton Commander 5, Microsoft Office Professional

*NVDA 5.x





Long live the 90's!!!


*


On 4/18/2016 3:27 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:


Rosemarie Chavarria wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted on staying with WinXP, "I asked him why and his answer was that it was simpler to work with."

And I can't count the times I've heard this, about way more than Windows, and thought, "No, it's not easier to work with - it's what you're used to." Win XP was an OS I loved and Microsoft has the annoying habit of alternating "good" and "bad" versions of Windows. The number of things that require manual intervention from the user in XP is huge compared to later versions, particularly Windows 7 forward. And, when it comes down to it, even in the "ugly" versions of Windows the similarities to their predecessors is at least as strong as the differences, but the differences are where people are required to learn something new.

David Moore's comments regarding those who live to be 100, or near it, really resonate with me. My grandmother died in the 1990s and was in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology was at her birth and the amount of change she and her age cohort had to go through I am amazed. I don't know if I could be as flexible as they were. While the pace of change has picked up, particularly in the cyber world, the majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements on very familiar themes rather than complete divergences from what came before. That was not true for my grandparents at all, and my parents experienced more revolutionary changes than I have, too. I think my only two revolutions were the introduction of the personal computer and the ascendance of the internet.

Brian


--
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@gmail.com <mailto:gmjc341961@gmail.com>


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

 

I agree.
If I were not at home, ie if I was traveling, or working or something then I'd upgrade.
I don't have a horse, but if going to work is the same as having a horse, I hardly take it out to use for anything.
In fact since university life itself is against me, its slowed right down so I have a tortis for a life.
I guess when I need to move I will, but every time I move there is more things I will need to get sorted, fixed or something.
I am in a sweet spot I don't need classic shell ribbon disablers and the like.

On 19/04/2016 9:37 a.m., David Moore wrote:
Can you travel about your country on your horse? There is a difference being at home and traveling the country or abroad.


From: Carlos
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2016 5:10 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

Hello:

What is this thing called freeway you speak of?

My horse and buggy ride just fine in all the pastures around my town!

There's nothing like the old days to make one feel right at home!!!





On 4/18/2016 12:27 PM, David Moore wrote:

Hi Pete,
Thank you so much, because I have made the same argument on many lists. Try using a horse and buggy on a free way. There comes a time when you just have to learn something new and change with the times. People who live over 100, say this is the main thing you have to do to live that long. Sometimes you have to forget the past and move on toward the future. Someday, I will be able to drive my own car, and I will embrace it. NVDA works so well in win10, and win10 is like a mantion over a log cabbin. We should have choice, but like you said, it can’t get in the way of the world changing for the good. Take care. If it takes buying new programs, it must be done because of the coming future. Start saving now, so you can prepare for the beautiful tech future that is to come. Have a great one.


From: Pete
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2016 2:43 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory


Same thing for people wanting windows x p.
I am getting ready to install w10, have to check on if w e 9 works in w10 or not. the f s people told me j16 works in w10 and sounds like people are using w 10 with nvda.
Change is good but one should not be forced to loose freedom of choice.

On 4/18/2016 2:22 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Pete wrote, "It's kind of like the whole e-mail thing with people wanting to use outlook express except people keep telling them to use Thunderbird or Microsoft outlook or window live mail or some thing like that."

This isn't a "freedom of choice" issue, it's a simple fact of life that certain programs, Outlook Express being one example, effectively cease to exist when official support ends. No one is guaranteed, nor should they expect, that anything that they're using will be available in perpetuity.

I discourage people from using Outlook Express because the only existing versions available are hacks based on who knows what code base and with what vulnerabilities. Since e-mail clients constantly interact with the internet this is a real concern.

While such a concern is not present regarding voice synthesis, things will come, and go, in that arena as well. There is very likely going to come a point where you, for any you, have to let go of something you're used to because it is not being supported or carried forward. Getting used to this, even though it's painful, is essential in the cyber world unless you want to drive yourself crazy. I've seen a lot of people over the years who have expended far more energy trying to hold on to something than would have been expended to learn the new that's available to them.

Brian





locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

 

Well it all depends on what context.
If you are moving up and needing newer programs in the first place then sure.
On the other hand I see no advantage to updating to any new program especially if the big programs, ms oses, office suites, big screen readers and such need updating to.
Point is if you are not moving foreward then I see no need to move especially if you have all the hardware and software at your disposal.
Now if your newaged hardware needs win10 or higher then maybe.
And if you can get business funding or other things fine.
But I see no advantage to move if you yourself are not or not going to move for some time because things are not moving that you currently need.
Granted, I use firefox and thunderbird and a few other things which may at some point need to change but most of my stuff runs as it does.

On 19/04/2016 6:59 a.m., Gene wrote:
Freedom of choice is fine up to a point but you are implying, in an analagous context, that people should be allowed to use Model T Fords to preserve freedom of choice. Too much choice equals stifling choice for many others. it is not reasonable nor practical to expect backward compatibility indefinitely. Over time, it may become too cumbersome to keep a program working on an increasingly old version of an operating system. Just as it becomes impractical to have model t fords on fast highways of today. I am not a tech so I can't discuss this from a technical standpointbut it is true that over time it becomes increasingly difficult to keep new versions of an operating system backwardly compatible with increasingly old programs.

As far as reviving Text Assist is concerned, it wouldn't make sense to do so in its original form. But the real problem with DEDTalk these days is that someone lost the original code and current versions are reconstructions and are not as good, though some reconstructions are quite reasonable. If the speech part of Text Assist, the DECTalk code, could be used to build a modern version of DECTalk, that might be worth doing. But Text Assist as such, wouldn't be practical to revive as it was.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Pete
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2016 1:43 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory



Same thing for people wanting windows x p.
I am getting ready to install w10, have to check on if w e 9 works in w10 or not. the f s people told me j16 works in w10 and sounds like people are using w 10 with nvda.
Change is good but one should not be forced to loose freedom of choice.

On 4/18/2016 2:22 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Pete wrote, "It's kind of like the whole e-mail thing with people wanting to use outlook express except people keep telling them to use Thunderbird or Microsoft outlook or window live mail or some thing like that."

This isn't a "freedom of choice" issue, it's a simple fact of life that certain programs, Outlook Express being one example, effectively cease to exist when official support ends. No one is guaranteed, nor should they expect, that anything that they're using will be available in perpetuity.

I discourage people from using Outlook Express because the only existing versions available are hacks based on who knows what code base and with what vulnerabilities. Since e-mail clients constantly interact with the internet this is a real concern.

While such a concern is not present regarding voice synthesis, things will come, and go, in that arena as well. There is very likely going to come a point where you, for any you, have to let go of something you're used to because it is not being supported or carried forward. Getting used to this, even though it's painful, is essential in the cyber world unless you want to drive yourself crazy. I've seen a lot of people over the years who have expended far more energy trying to hold on to something than would have been expended to learn the new that's available to them.

Brian




locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

 

How did you get that working.
I have heard someone actually have a up to date machine.
This machine did control an nvda vm with an old os.
This system ran through talking dosbox with the vertual bns active and old windoweyes.
This was piped throu to a nvda remote session a vmware controled win98 unit also with nvda etc, etc.
So it can be done using nvda as a sort of server system with the effects and features nvda and other readers have.

On 19/04/2016 11:21 a.m., Hank Smith, and Seeing-eye dog Iona wrote:
you mean it runs on windows 3.1?
oh my
how good does it run?
On 4/18/2016 4:11 PM, Carlos wrote:

Hello Again:

A description of my PC:


*Packard Bell Legend V

*386SX 16MHz Processor

*125 Megabyte Hard Disk

*EGA Video Card

*14 Inch Monitor

*Sound Blaster I Sound Card

*101 PS/2 Keyboard/Logitech Three Button Mouse w/Rubber Ball on
Bottom

*Windows 3.11/MS DOS 6.22

*Norton Commander 5, Microsoft Office Professional

*NVDA 5.x


Long live the 90's!!!

*

On 4/18/2016 3:27 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Rosemarie Chavarria wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted
on staying with WinXP, "I asked him why and his answer was that it
was simpler to work with."

And I can't count the times I've heard this, about way more than
Windows, and thought, "No, it's not easier to work with - it's what
you're used to." Win XP was an OS I loved and Microsoft has the
annoying habit of alternating "good" and "bad" versions of Windows.
The number of things that require manual intervention from the user
in XP is huge compared to later versions, particularly Windows 7
forward. And, when it comes down to it, even in the "ugly" versions
of Windows the similarities to their predecessors is at least as
strong as the differences, but the differences are where people are
required to learn something new.

David Moore's comments regarding those who live to be 100, or near
it, really resonate with me. My grandmother died in the 1990s and
was in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology was at
her birth and the amount of change she and her age cohort had to go
through I am amazed. I don't know if I could be as flexible as they
were. While the pace of change has picked up, particularly in the
cyber world, the majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just
short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements on very
familiar themes rather than complete divergences from what came
before. That was not true for my grandparents at all, and my parents
experienced more revolutionary changes than I have, too. I think my
only two revolutions were the introduction of the personal computer
and the ascendance of the internet.

Brian
--
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. -gmjc341961@gmail.com


Re: nvda and react os

 

Well pete I'd like to know what would happen if you tried to install nvda on react os.
Technically if it is a windows like os, even without all the extra things nvda will run and will put out something.

On 19/04/2016 3:35 a.m., Pete wrote:

the react OS boots no sound, I'll have another go at it when I get
sound working.
I am curious about what kind of errors nvda or react OSes will put out.


On 4/15/2016 1:12 AM, mattias wrote:
" It's really nice of m s to only provide it to businesses and not end
users. "
have ms even cared about end users?
no
money money money

Den 2016-04-14 kl. 02:50, skrev Pete:

two pluses are react o s can run from live cd or can be installed
to hard drive.
It is open source so free to use like nvda.
The nvda screen reader paired up with a bootable windows like os on
a disk or u s b would come in handy.
Then again react o s would have to be able to run windows setup.
A bootable windows system on a flash or cd rom with speech is
available from the enterprise edition of windows 8.1 and up I think.
It is called windows to go and installs to a u s b drive.
It's really nice of m s to only provide it to businesses and not
end users.
Pete
On 4/11/2016 9:32 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
Well it would be good if react os would become accessible.
One thing that is a driving force for me is it will run windows
programs and therefore games and screen readers probably though
thats not the only thing.
With the rise of ms own account system, and later oses such as
windows 8x and 10 a lot of things we have taken for granted are on
the move or going out.
The desktop app is on the way out, and while I know those of us that
have embraced cross platform and touch tablets are round and getting
more commenplace there are still those I'd imagine like me that have
never changed.
I for example would still be quite happy with an xp like interface,
or a win7 like interface for windows and office and everything else
without the crazy ribbon system wishfull as it currently is.
And in some way being I came round the time dos was still king I
sometimes want to return to the simple times where your os was just
a basic crappy box where you shoved apps on.
As it is, I have used the desktop so much the cloud and all the
online apps are something I have never been born into and I see no
reason bar the obvious why I would want to change now.
In fact I see no reason from a user standpoint for what I do to even
upgrade from xp though I do like the newer 7 interface.
As an os a windows 10 core is nice but even so I see no need for the
extra features.
At the same time I wouldn't mind staying with a windows like os, as
while yes there is linux I have to deal with windows and windows is
what I grew up mostly with.
Its why I have a simbian cell now and will for some time.
And its probably why I have windows 7 and others in my immediate
family will for the future do also.
Every time I try to get the nerve to upgrade I and my family have
found it harder and harder to upgrade an os.
windows 3x to 95 was a no brainer.
as was 95 to 98 and then from 98 to xp.
But that is where it stuck, I saw no need to go vista.
And if xp hadn't gone out of support I wouldn't have left that.
I am happy I went to 7 though.
However yet again another sticking point, I see no need to ever
upgrade again.
And with my dad retiring at the end of next month, the drive to have
the latest legal office program and latest legal os is greatly
diminished.
Now thats not going to mean I won't upgrade, or that I will pirate
the next windows and office but its going to get just that bit
harder to move on to use something I wouldn't ever need.
Even if its true I would probably be fine with it afterward.
Now if I could buy an os core and use whatever interface I want and
whatever feature set and take bits and bobs of both it wouldn't
matter a dime but I have to take it or leave it and that really
starts to put me in a position especially now my funds will be more
reduced.
Its going to become a have to rather than like to.
Or to put it another way, a if it works and I don't loose my data
then I won't.
But like all things react os may never get there.



On 12/04/2016 11:18 a.m., Pete wrote:

Hi
I keep checking on the react os project. It is up 04.40 now.
So far in accessibility they came up with a built in magnifier and
looks like some kind of access wizard.
I think they need blind computer users to show an interest in
it. May
be they will get it accessible.
The read me is belo.
---
========================
ReactOS™ Version 0.4.x
Updated January 5, 2016
========================

1. What is ReactOS?
-------------------

ReactOS™ is an Open Source effort to develop a quality operating
system
that is
compatible with applications and drivers written for the Microsoft®
Windows™ NT
family of operating systems (NT4, 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, Seven).

More information is available at: http://www.reactos.org


2. Relationship with the WINE project
-------------------------------------

ReactOS has always intended to work with the WINE project to share
as much
programming effort as possible. This mainly concerns User Mode DLLs
and
still happens to a degree today. Other areas of cooperation lie in
applications and testing suites.


3. Future compatibility
-----------------------

The ReactOS project, although currently focused on Windows Server 2003
compatibility, is always keeping an eye toward compatibility with
Windows Vista and future Windows NT releases.


4. Supporting other System Applications
---------------------------------------

The Windows NT architecture allows for subsystems, as does the ReactOS
architecture. A subsystem is an implementation of the APIs of another
operating system, allowing ReactOS to run applications from other
systems.
We are already looking at subsystems for: Java, OS/2, and DOS and
possibly
others in the future.


5. Tutorials
------------

Developer and User Tutorials: http://www.reactos.org/wiki

The tutorials contain more information on the project, compiling and
testing
ReactOS - amongst other topics. Contributors to the project are always
welcome.


6. Author
---------

This document was written by Jason Filby (jasonfilby@yahoo.com).

---
Thanks!
Pete



.










locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

 

The old systems are much simpler.
Its harder to justify updating when my needs are met that is my problem.
Before I always had a need, now I don't.

On 19/04/2016 10:03 a.m., Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, Brian,

You bring up some very good points here. I was talking to a friend the other day and he said he wishes he could go back to windows XP. I asked him why and his answer was that it was simpler to work with. He's a great example of someone who wants to stay in the stone age so to speak. I tried to suggest that he upgrades to windows 10 but he doesn't want to. Like the old saying goes, you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink.

Rosemarie

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2016 11:23 AM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

Pete wrote, "It's kind of like the whole e-mail thing with people wanting to use outlook express except people keep telling them to use Thunderbird or Microsoft outlook or window live mail or some thing like that."

This isn't a "freedom of choice" issue, it's a simple fact of life that certain programs, Outlook Express being one example, effectively cease to exist when official support ends. No one is guaranteed, nor should they expect, that anything that they're using will be available in perpetuity.

I discourage people from using Outlook Express because the only existing versions available are hacks based on who knows what code base and with what vulnerabilities. Since e-mail clients constantly interact with the internet this is a real concern.

While such a concern is not present regarding voice synthesis, things will come, and go, in that arena as well. There is very likely going to come a point where you, for any you, have to let go of something you're used to because it is not being supported or carried forward. Getting used to this, even though it's painful, is essential in the cyber world unless you want to drive yourself crazy. I've seen a lot of people over the years who have expended far more energy trying to hold on to something than would have been expended to learn the new that's available to them.

Brian





.


NVDACon International 2016: what to bring, important notes on the TeamTalk settings, schedule and topics

 

Ladies and gentlemen,

 

First, thank you for your enthusiasm for NVDA’s tenth anniversary and the NVDACon 2016. I’m Joseph Lee, the chair of the NVDA Tenth Anniversary Planning Committee.

 

As the conference is three days away, I’d like to pass out last minute information such as what to bring, topics to be covered and so on:

 

·         What to bring: You’ll need to install TeamTalk 5 Client (use Classic client). It is recommended that you use a microphone, but you don’t have to (text chat would be fine).

·         For common courtesy, please try using push to talk mode (after installing TeamTalk 5, start it, press F4, check push to talk checkbox and configure the key).

·         Schedule: the final schedule has been posted at http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/nvdacon.php. All times are in UTC. Each session will start at the listed time, so don’t be late.

·         Topics: Topics to be covered throughout this conference include NVDA’s past, present and future, math support, braille features, online communities, Mozilla’s collaboration, Dictation Bridge and many others. We’ll also have two sessions dedicated to learning NvDA – the first is for those who’re coming from a different screen reader, and the other is for those who are new to NVDA.

 

Hope to see many of you at NVDACon.

Cheers,

Joseph


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

 

Ron Canazzi wrote, "I agree with this to a point, but let's be real. The Model T analogy doesn't hold water. I do not encourage people to stick with DOS or Windows 95 for sure, but I also don't think it is always advisable to go out and get the alleged best of the best right away. Moderation is always the best policy."

Your central point is well taken, and I've made the same one.  That being said, Windows XP and Outlook Express are, at this point, direct analogs of the Model T and they seem to be the things that are most frequently clung to.

It's also not "preachy" to bring up issues that seem to be repeatedly glossed over as though they do not exist.  Informed consent is a part of moderation, too.

In the final analysis I'm with you:  I don't really care what decision any individual makes.  Different people can and do weigh different factors differently.  But open discussion of the factors at play, and as many of those that are available, is not a bad thing.

Brian


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

Ron Canazzi
 

What bothers me is when Blind people who have mastered a certain task: whether it's a new piece of software; a new operating system or going to the bathroom if it comes to it--get all preachy and self righteous about it.

As far as I'm concerned, if someone wants to use XP or whatever I really don't care. I will advise them in a pert and proper manner and if they don't listen--that's OK too!

On 4/18/2016 6:27 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Rosemarie Chavarria wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted on staying with WinXP, "I asked him why and his answer was that it was simpler to work with."

And I can't count the times I've heard this, about way more than Windows, and thought, "No, it's not easier to work with - it's what you're used to." Win XP was an OS I loved and Microsoft has the annoying habit of alternating "good" and "bad" versions of Windows. The number of things that require manual intervention from the user in XP is huge compared to later versions, particularly Windows 7 forward. And, when it comes down to it, even in the "ugly" versions of Windows the similarities to their predecessors is at least as strong as the differences, but the differences are where people are required to learn something new.

David Moore's comments regarding those who live to be 100, or near it, really resonate with me. My grandmother died in the 1990s and was in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology was at her birth and the amount of change she and her age cohort had to go through I am amazed. I don't know if I could be as flexible as they were. While the pace of change has picked up, particularly in the cyber world, the majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements on very familiar themes rather than complete divergences from what came before. That was not true for my grandparents at all, and my parents experienced more revolutionary changes than I have, too. I think my only two revolutions were the introduction of the personal computer and the ascendance of the internet.

Brian
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,

I agree with this to a point, but let's be real. The Model T analogy doesn't hold water. I do not encourage people to stick with DOS or Windows 95 for sure, but I also don't think it is always advisable to go out and get the alleged best of the best right away. Moderation is always the best policy.

On 4/18/2016 3:04 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Gene wrote, "Freedom of choice is fine up to a point but you are implying, in an analagous context, that people should be allowed to use Model T Fords to preserve freedom of choice. Too much choice equals stifling choice for many others. it is not reasonable nor practical to expect backward compatibility indefinitely."

To which I cannot say, more loudly, "Amen brother!!"

I really don't know why people think that the cyber world can, will, or should offer indefinite backward compatibility when none of the rest of the world ever has. Whether it's because it's too cumbersome or difficult or because a given vendor just decides "time's up," the loss of stuff in the cyber world is a fact of life just like it is "in real life."

The fact that it is easier, often by far, to cling to something in the cyber world long past its "expiration date" only complicates the problem.

Brian
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Question/Do You Hear a Difference with ESpeak with the new Master and Next Versions?

David Goldfield
 

Hello.
I noticed that ESpeak has a more harsher sound to it with the latest
next and master versions, compared to 2016.1 and earlier releases. I
have filed a ticket about this and it seems like some people are
noticing it on some machines while others are not. I suppose I can get
used to it but I find it just so much harsher and am wondering what
others who are running these versions perceive?

--
David Goldfield,
Assistive Technology Specialist

Feel free to visit my Web site
WWW.DavidGoldfield.Info


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

Carlos
 

Hello!

    Earlier today the conversation came up on the list once again about people not wanting to keep up with the times.

    So, in an effort to poke some fun I decided to describe what my very first 386SX PC was like.

    It would probably had run NVDA 5.x which was the first version of NVDA in 2006.

    Just wanted to clear this up with you so that you would understand all the silliness that goes on this list on a daily basis!

    hope you have a very nice day/evening!  And, go ahead and give your K9 friend a nice treat!!!



On 4/18/2016 4:21 PM, Hank Smith, and Seeing-eye dog Iona wrote:
you mean it runs on windows 3.1?
oh my
how good does it run?
On 4/18/2016 4:11 PM, Carlos wrote:

Hello Again:

    A description of my PC:


    *Packard Bell Legend V

    *386SX 16MHz Processor

    *125 Megabyte Hard Disk

    *EGA Video Card

    *14 Inch Monitor

    *Sound Blaster I Sound Card

    *101 PS/2 Keyboard/Logitech Three Button Mouse w/Rubber Ball on Bottom

    *Windows 3.11/MS DOS 6.22

    *Norton Commander 5, Microsoft Office Professional

    *NVDA 5.x


    Long live the 90's!!!

    *

On 4/18/2016 3:27 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Rosemarie Chavarria wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted on staying with WinXP, "I asked him why and his answer was that it was simpler to work with."

And I can't count the times I've heard this, about way more than Windows, and thought, "No, it's not easier to work with - it's what you're used to."  Win XP was an OS I loved and Microsoft has the annoying habit of alternating "good" and "bad" versions of Windows.  The number of things that require manual intervention from the user in XP is huge compared to later versions, particularly Windows 7 forward.  And, when it comes down to it, even in the "ugly" versions of Windows the similarities to their predecessors is at least as strong as the differences, but the differences are where people are required to learn something new.

David Moore's comments regarding those who live to be 100, or near it, really resonate with me.  My grandmother died in the 1990s and was in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology was at her birth and the amount of change she and her age cohort had to go through I am amazed.  I don't know if I could be as flexible as they were.  While the pace of change has picked up, particularly in the cyber world, the majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements on very familiar themes rather than complete divergences from what came before.  That was not true for my grandparents at all, and my parents experienced more revolutionary changes than I have, too.  I think my only two revolutions were the introduction of the personal computer and the ascendance of the internet.

Brian


-- 
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@...


-- 
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@...


Re: TWBlue stopped working, please help?

brandon
 

did you guys try running it in compatibility mode if not here are the steps
1: while on the twblue shortcut on your desktop hit your applications key or shift +f10 if you do not have such a key
2: you are now in a context menu arrow down until you hear trouble shoot compatibility issues
3: hit enter on this and then follow the wizard that appears
4: when asked for the operating system use your up and down arrows a couple times because sometimes it does not stick on windows vista
5: after you have done all this twblue should pop right up and you should be good to go
Yours truly,
Brandon,
Reed

On 4/18/2016 3:14 PM, chris miles wrote:
On 18-Apr-16 11:05 PM, Scott VanDeWalle wrote:
Hello.
I used to have both twblue and chicken nugget.
I got rid of TWblue, but i still have chicken nugget.
The thing is, sometimes one app will work and one won't.
Nugget is us d 15$.
If you can make it work, chicken nugget seems to work pretty good from the invisible interface.
It works the other way too but it seems somewhat more sluggish at times.
hth

Scott

On 4/17/2016 11:23 PM, Lisa P Geibel wrote:
Hi,
I know I've heard about people with this program and it not working. I even went through the time when extra characters were added to the twblue.exe file, but this is not the case now. We've uninstalled and reinstalled the latest version, but still nothing. Restarted the computer and still nothing. Tried hitting enter on the desktop icon for the program, tried running it as administrator with the context key, tried loading it from the twblue.exe icon in the program files folder and still nothing. Does anyone have any ideas or should we really say a final farewell to this great program? We're running Windows 10 with the latest build of NVDA and also have the latest version of JAWS, but it won't work that way either. Any ideas or help would be greatly appreciated? Thanks.


Hi,

I had the same issue, TW Blue would not start.

I decided to go back to the previous build and this now works a treat.


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

 

you mean it runs on windows 3.1?
oh my
how good does it run?

On 4/18/2016 4:11 PM, Carlos wrote:

Hello Again:

    A description of my PC:


    *Packard Bell Legend V

    *386SX 16MHz Processor

    *125 Megabyte Hard Disk

    *EGA Video Card

    *14 Inch Monitor

    *Sound Blaster I Sound Card

    *101 PS/2 Keyboard/Logitech Three Button Mouse w/Rubber Ball on Bottom

    *Windows 3.11/MS DOS 6.22

    *Norton Commander 5, Microsoft Office Professional

    *NVDA 5.x


    Long live the 90's!!!

    *

On 4/18/2016 3:27 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Rosemarie Chavarria wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted on staying with WinXP, "I asked him why and his answer was that it was simpler to work with."

And I can't count the times I've heard this, about way more than Windows, and thought, "No, it's not easier to work with - it's what you're used to."  Win XP was an OS I loved and Microsoft has the annoying habit of alternating "good" and "bad" versions of Windows.  The number of things that require manual intervention from the user in XP is huge compared to later versions, particularly Windows 7 forward.  And, when it comes down to it, even in the "ugly" versions of Windows the similarities to their predecessors is at least as strong as the differences, but the differences are where people are required to learn something new.

David Moore's comments regarding those who live to be 100, or near it, really resonate with me.  My grandmother died in the 1990s and was in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology was at her birth and the amount of change she and her age cohort had to go through I am amazed.  I don't know if I could be as flexible as they were.  While the pace of change has picked up, particularly in the cyber world, the majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements on very familiar themes rather than complete divergences from what came before.  That was not true for my grandparents at all, and my parents experienced more revolutionary changes than I have, too.  I think my only two revolutions were the introduction of the personal computer and the ascendance of the internet.

Brian


-- 
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@...


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

Carlos
 

Hello Again:

    A description of my PC:


    *Packard Bell Legend V

    *386SX 16MHz Processor

    *125 Megabyte Hard Disk

    *EGA Video Card

    *14 Inch Monitor

    *Sound Blaster I Sound Card

    *101 PS/2 Keyboard/Logitech Three Button Mouse w/Rubber Ball on Bottom

    *Windows 3.11/MS DOS 6.22

    *Norton Commander 5, Microsoft Office Professional

    *NVDA 5.x


    Long live the 90's!!!

    *

On 4/18/2016 3:27 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Rosemarie Chavarria wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted on staying with WinXP, "I asked him why and his answer was that it was simpler to work with."

And I can't count the times I've heard this, about way more than Windows, and thought, "No, it's not easier to work with - it's what you're used to."  Win XP was an OS I loved and Microsoft has the annoying habit of alternating "good" and "bad" versions of Windows.  The number of things that require manual intervention from the user in XP is huge compared to later versions, particularly Windows 7 forward.  And, when it comes down to it, even in the "ugly" versions of Windows the similarities to their predecessors is at least as strong as the differences, but the differences are where people are required to learn something new.

David Moore's comments regarding those who live to be 100, or near it, really resonate with me.  My grandmother died in the 1990s and was in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology was at her birth and the amount of change she and her age cohort had to go through I am amazed.  I don't know if I could be as flexible as they were.  While the pace of change has picked up, particularly in the cyber world, the majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements on very familiar themes rather than complete divergences from what came before.  That was not true for my grandparents at all, and my parents experienced more revolutionary changes than I have, too.  I think my only two revolutions were the introduction of the personal computer and the ascendance of the internet.

Brian


-- 
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@...


locked Re: This is the moderator speaking: Question Regarding Eloquence for NVDA from Code Factory

 

Rosemarie Chavarria wrote, in regard to a friend of hers who insisted on staying with WinXP, "I asked him why and his answer was that it was simpler to work with."

And I can't count the times I've heard this, about way more than Windows, and thought, "No, it's not easier to work with - it's what you're used to."  Win XP was an OS I loved and Microsoft has the annoying habit of alternating "good" and "bad" versions of Windows.  The number of things that require manual intervention from the user in XP is huge compared to later versions, particularly Windows 7 forward.  And, when it comes down to it, even in the "ugly" versions of Windows the similarities to their predecessors is at least as strong as the differences, but the differences are where people are required to learn something new.

David Moore's comments regarding those who live to be 100, or near it, really resonate with me.  My grandmother died in the 1990s and was in her 90s at the time. When I think about what technology was at her birth and the amount of change she and her age cohort had to go through I am amazed.  I don't know if I could be as flexible as they were.  While the pace of change has picked up, particularly in the cyber world, the majority of changes I've lived through (I'm just short of 54 years old) feel to me much more like refinements on very familiar themes rather than complete divergences from what came before.  That was not true for my grandparents at all, and my parents experienced more revolutionary changes than I have, too.  I think my only two revolutions were the introduction of the personal computer and the ascendance of the internet.

Brian


Re: TWBlue stopped working, please help?

chris miles
 

On 18-Apr-16 11:05 PM, Scott VanDeWalle wrote:
Hello.
I used to have both twblue and chicken nugget.
I got rid of TWblue, but i still have chicken nugget.
The thing is, sometimes one app will work and one won't.
Nugget is us d 15$.
If you can make it work, chicken nugget seems to work pretty good from the invisible interface.
It works the other way too but it seems somewhat more sluggish at times.
hth

Scott

On 4/17/2016 11:23 PM, Lisa P Geibel wrote:
Hi,
I know I've heard about people with this program and it not working. I even went through the time when extra characters were added to the twblue.exe file, but this is not the case now. We've uninstalled and reinstalled the latest version, but still nothing. Restarted the computer and still nothing. Tried hitting enter on the desktop icon for the program, tried running it as administrator with the context key, tried loading it from the twblue.exe icon in the program files folder and still nothing. Does anyone have any ideas or should we really say a final farewell to this great program? We're running Windows 10 with the latest build of NVDA and also have the latest version of JAWS, but it won't work that way either. Any ideas or help would be greatly appreciated? Thanks.

Hi,

I had the same issue, TW Blue would not start.

I decided to go back to the previous build and this now works a treat.


Re: TWBlue stopped working, please help?

Scott VanDeWalle
 

Hello.
I used to have both twblue and chicken nugget.
I got rid of TWblue, but i still have chicken nugget.
The thing is, sometimes one app will work and one won't.
Nugget is us d 15$.
If you can make it work, chicken nugget seems to work pretty good from the invisible interface.
It works the other way too but it seems somewhat more sluggish at times.
hth

Scott

On 4/17/2016 11:23 PM, Lisa P Geibel wrote:
Hi,
I know I've heard about people with this program and it not working. I even went through the time when extra characters were added to the twblue.exe file, but this is not the case now. We've uninstalled and reinstalled the latest version, but still nothing. Restarted the computer and still nothing. Tried hitting enter on the desktop icon for the program, tried running it as administrator with the context key, tried loading it from the twblue.exe icon in the program files folder and still nothing. Does anyone have any ideas or should we really say a final farewell to this great program? We're running Windows 10 with the latest build of NVDA and also have the latest version of JAWS, but it won't work that way either. Any ideas or help would be greatly appreciated? Thanks.