Date   

Re: NVDA and office 2016

 

Hi,

It also depends on which build of Office 365 you’ve got, because sometimes that makes a difference (fixes are in Outlook, for instance).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Nutt
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 7:34 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and office 2016

 

Hi Quentin,

 

Now if we could persuade NVDA to stop crashing every time you change Outlook folders, Office would be usable again.

 

I know Freedom Sci had to hack around this problem with MS, something to do with UIA calls.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Quentin Christensen
Sent: 08 November 2017 22:58
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and office 2016

 

Hi Mary,

 

Office 2016 is in many ways similar to Office 2013.  NVDA works very well with both, and in a couple of cases, Microsoft have fixed bugs in 2016 so there are some things that work better.  I wrote the official NV Access training material for Microsoft Word and Excel using Office 2016.  The material itself works for Office 2010 to 2016 (I found in more cases I was noting a difference in the behaviour of Office 2010 compared to the other two, rather than a new difference in Office 2016).

 

If you are interested, our material is available from: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

 

Kind regards

 

Quentin.

 

On Thu, Nov 9, 2017 at 9:42 AM, Mary Otten <motten53@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I was just looking on Jean‘s website, Accessibility central.net, and there was a tutorial there for using Microsoft Word with NVDA. It mentioned office 2013. I have a friend who uses a different screen reader, and he also uses 2013. Is 2016 accessible? I hope so, because that seems to be the currently available version.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone



 

--

Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

 

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

 

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Hi,

Okay, we need a more “colorful picture” please: synthesizer, whether it happens with NVDA in safe mode (add-ons disabled) and what not.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 8:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Is currently super, super sluggish in windows explorer in windows 10.

I’m truly baffled as to why I’m the only one seeing this or taking notice. Switching to JFW there is such a difference it’s hard to explain, especially on lower end computers with atom processors and even lower end core I series.

I’d have thought by this time a bug report would have been issued. I’m not about to do it if nobody else is noticing NVDA’s sluggishness – even though me and a few other people I know are – maybe it’s just us being impatient?

 

From: Steve Nutt
Sent: November 10, 2017 9:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Hi Tyler,

 

You hit another nail there, usability.  Currently, NVDA crashes all over the place in outlook 2016, I can’t even use it.

 

If I had to rely on it for my daily bread, the fix is a long time coming.  Whereas, in JAWS 2018, they have fixed it already.

 

So to some extent, you do get what you pay for.  The fixing of MS Outlook is obviously not a high enough priority with NVDA to push out a quick update.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: 09 November 2017 08:42
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Hi,

My workplace provided me with jaws.

Open source is nice, things get fixed, yes, but companies, especially government companies, want things that simply work and are well known and reliable. Also probably have an ongoing license with jaws, so why not use it?

Me personally, if I had a job requiring jaws, $125 every 2 years is hardly a drop in the bucket especially considering if the company pays for the license itself. Also for me, NVDA wasn’t usable in most of the cataloguing programs I worked in whereas jaws was. This was a few years back now, though, so things might change.

 

 

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: November 9, 2017 2:28 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Sadly this is the curse as much as it is a blessing with opensource.

 

Look at blind extra, there is probably nothing to stop people modifying

nvda with a virus and releasing it as something else and tricking users.

 

I know we have a good security review of addons, but  what are ways we

can protect nvda if any from this.

 

Governments and such probably have a contract with vfo and need jaws

jaws or nothing.

 

I couldn't load anything bar jaws at university.

 

They simply wouldn't accept anything bar jaws.

 

On the other hand, if your work wants you to use jaws they should foot

the bill for it, and all upgrades, and smas, and if you suddenly have an

system upgrade and need to buy the same functionality again, then let

them pay the 600000 or so bucks for the privilage.

 

Not the users issue.

 

If they want to use a company with bad support, you just say I am not

paying for it, you pay or I just won't bother.

 

Users can not afford a lot of the access tech because governments and

organisations are paying for licences.

 

Dolphin stuff is affordable to some extent the rest naaah.

 

 

 

 

On 9/11/2017 7:52 p.m., Mike and Jenna wrote:

> Hi,

> I have to chime in here. My wife works for the government and they will not allow NVDA either. They said they do not allow anything on their systems ware you can get the code for it online because it forms a security risk for their systems. I love NVDA but can see due to the response form her IT department a hard line against letting NVDA into many government uses.

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee

> Sent: Thursday, November 9, 2017 1:15 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hi Sky,

> I'm sure Quentin will weigh on this more, but when you meet this person next month, can you ask him the following questions:

> * Please define "security".

> * So it was claimed that closed source products are more secure. There are tons of examples where open-source software might offer equal or better security, not because of openness of code, but due to potential to fix issues early on through contributions. What's your opinion on that?

> * Until a few years ago, using NVDA in professional setting was only a dream, but we're getting to a point where more organizations are choosing to use NVDA, and there are international examples out there. Do you have any comments on that?

> * So Window-Eyes was chosen due to "perceived improved security due to close-source nature of the program". What is more secure in 2017: unsupported program that people cannot offer quality security fixes on a timely manner, or an open-source product that does have community backing, including looking out for security problems?

> In case this person asks who and why these questions are asked, please tell him that a reputable NVDA developer asks these questions, and this developer is asking tough questions to get this person to think critically. If he asks, "why should I care or think critically", please tell him that thinking critically allows one to make better choices in the end, including policy decisions (yes, that's my debator side coming out). In the end, it would be much better (strategically) if you frame these questions as though you are asking them, because it also allows you to think carefully about what you are dealing with.

> Cheers,

> Joseph

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sky Mundell

> Sent: Wednesday, November 8, 2017 10:04 PM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hello. Let me check with him next month, and I'll get back to you on this subject.

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bhavya shah

> Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 10:02 PM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hi Sky,

> Before we debate the security of NVDA, I think we need to get the case of the library representative clarified. Firstly, what are the bases of this assertion that NVDA is less secure? Secondly, assuming that the claimant has the requisite technical knowhow, has he perused NVDA's source code to substantiate this claim? Thirdly, are there any specific security vulnerabilities or exploits present in NVDA that he can point us to?

> Unless the library representative can provide cogent responses to the above questions, or strengthen his claim by concrete evidence, I would dismiss such a comment as a misinformed and groundless one which holds no water.

> Thanks.

> On 11/9/17, Sky Mundell <skyt@...> wrote:

>> Hello All. Today, I was at our monthly technology meeting at a public

>> library here in Victoria, British Columbia, and NVDA was one of the

>> screen reading options discussed to a new participant who had low

>> vision. However, the tech at the library looked at it, and he told the

>> group that it was less secure, and they commented that it was better

>> for home use, rather than in corporate environments. Would NV Access

>> staffers like to comment on this issue, and what can be done to

>> address this issue? Because they were going to settle on the

>> Window-Eyes for office option back when it was being updated, but as

>> we all know it got discontinued and they did look at Window-Eyes as an

>> option and they were more in favour of it due to it not being Open

>> Source. They also did have JAWS for a time but got rid of it due to

>> lack of training and they would have had to spend money to get

>> somebody from FS to train them on it.  Any suggestions you guys could give me would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Sky.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

> --

> Best Regards

> Bhavya Shah

> Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

> Contacting Me

> E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@... Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125 Mobile Number: +91 7506221750

>

 

 

 

 

 


Re: NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

erik burggraaf <erik@...>
 

Hi Steve, anyone can alter the code of an open source project, true. a what I fail to understand is, how is this an inherent ecurity concern? The altered code must be installed in order to do what you author it to do. You can blow up the code five ways from Sunday, but if you are installing official builds, no one will ever see your damaged code. In theory, I suppose someone could hack the update server, place a damaged update into the update queue, and roll it out to other computers. I have to say though, I think that's a very very miniscule risk.

Administrators of public computer systems generally lock things down, so that users cannot get access to the program files folder, the windows folder, and other critical system functions. Users can not simply walk up and install anything they want, regardless of whether it is open source or not. If your systems are secure, and the Distribution Systems for the software are secure, and the policies you operate under are secure, then regardless of whether the software is open source or not, the entire procedure should be secure.

If you are a foolish administrator, allowing users to install things willy-nilly on public computers, then there is a very high risk of that someone will go to virusladengames.com, and download a bunch of crap to the computer. I would consider this a much greater risk, then securely installing open source software to provide accessibility.

Unless I am greatly missing something, I submit that installing code from an unknown source is a security risk, but the innate ability to modify code is not.

On November 10, 2017 10:42:26 AM "Steve Nutt" <steve@comproom.co.uk> wrote:

Hi,

I would have thought the security aspect is obvious. Since it is open source, anyone has access to the code, and anyone can alter it. So I can understand workplace concerns.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bhavya shah
Sent: 09 November 2017 06:02
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Hi Sky,
Before we debate the security of NVDA, I think we need to get the case of the library representative clarified. Firstly, what are the bases of this assertion that NVDA is less secure? Secondly, assuming that the claimant has the requisite technical knowhow, has he perused NVDA's source code to substantiate this claim? Thirdly, are there any specific security vulnerabilities or exploits present in NVDA that he can point us to?
Unless the library representative can provide cogent responses to the above questions, or strengthen his claim by concrete evidence, I would dismiss such a comment as a misinformed and groundless one which holds no water.
Thanks.

On 11/9/17, Sky Mundell <skyt@shaw.ca> wrote:
Hello All. Today, I was at our monthly technology meeting at a public
library here in Victoria, British Columbia, and NVDA was one of the
screen reading options discussed to a new participant who had low
vision. However, the tech at the library looked at it, and he told the
group that it was less secure, and they commented that it was better
for home use, rather than in corporate environments. Would NV Access
staffers like to comment on this issue, and what can be done to
address this issue? Because they were going to settle on the
Window-Eyes for office option back when it was being updated, but as
we all know it got discontinued and they did look at Window-Eyes as an
option and they were more in favour of it due to it not being Open
Source. They also did have JAWS for a time but got rid of it due to
lack of training and they would have had to spend money to get
somebody from FS to train them on it. Any suggestions you guys could give me would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Sky.





--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah

Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

Contacting Me
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125 Mobile Number: +91 7506221750


Re: How to get native SAPI 5 mobile voices in Win10?

Tony Ballou
 

Hi Ketan,


I just did this a couple of days ago. when my laptop came back from the
shop, my friend set my language for English United Kingdom, and I had to
change it to English United states. Hopefully I get this right, what you
have to do is to go to settings, and select time and language. Once
there, press tab once to move to the list of options, they are time,
region and language, and speech. By default, time is selected. Arrow
down once to the region and language option and press enter. From this
point, press tab twice to the add a language button and hit space on it.
When you hit space on this button, you will be prompted to type the name
of the language you want in the search edit box. If you're unsure of how
it's spelled, no worries, press tab once and there will be a list box
with loads of choices for languages in it.  Using the arrow keys, select
the choice you want and hit space on it. Press enter again and you will
be presented with a list of the different dialects that apply to that
particular language.  For example, in the English language, you have 16
dialects to choose from.  By default mine is set for English United
States so only the remaining 15 show up. If you know what dialect you
want you can type it in the search box, or tab once and select it from
the list.  Just for the fun of it, I added the English UK voices to my
desktop, to help me with composing this message.  Once you've selected
your dialect, you are brought back to the main time and language
screen.  If you are satisfied with your changes, you can hit alt-f4 to
close things up.

Hope this helps and is not to overwhelming.


Tony

On 11/10/2017 12:05 AM, Ketan Kothari wrote:
Hi friends,

I have Windows 10 home edition and when I change my synthesiser I am
only getting David and Xira voices under SAPI 5 but I have been told
that there are more native voices available with british accent as
well. I am using Windows 10 1703 build. Please do guide me.


With best wishes,

Ketan


Re: NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Tyler Wood
 

Is currently super, super sluggish in windows explorer in windows 10.

I’m truly baffled as to why I’m the only one seeing this or taking notice. Switching to JFW there is such a difference it’s hard to explain, especially on lower end computers with atom processors and even lower end core I series.

I’d have thought by this time a bug report would have been issued. I’m not about to do it if nobody else is noticing NVDA’s sluggishness – even though me and a few other people I know are – maybe it’s just us being impatient?

 

From: Steve Nutt
Sent: November 10, 2017 9:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Hi Tyler,

 

You hit another nail there, usability.  Currently, NVDA crashes all over the place in outlook 2016, I can’t even use it.

 

If I had to rely on it for my daily bread, the fix is a long time coming.  Whereas, in JAWS 2018, they have fixed it already.

 

So to some extent, you do get what you pay for.  The fixing of MS Outlook is obviously not a high enough priority with NVDA to push out a quick update.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: 09 November 2017 08:42
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Hi,

My workplace provided me with jaws.

Open source is nice, things get fixed, yes, but companies, especially government companies, want things that simply work and are well known and reliable. Also probably have an ongoing license with jaws, so why not use it?

Me personally, if I had a job requiring jaws, $125 every 2 years is hardly a drop in the bucket especially considering if the company pays for the license itself. Also for me, NVDA wasn’t usable in most of the cataloguing programs I worked in whereas jaws was. This was a few years back now, though, so things might change.

 

 

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: November 9, 2017 2:28 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Sadly this is the curse as much as it is a blessing with opensource.

 

Look at blind extra, there is probably nothing to stop people modifying

nvda with a virus and releasing it as something else and tricking users.

 

I know we have a good security review of addons, but  what are ways we

can protect nvda if any from this.

 

Governments and such probably have a contract with vfo and need jaws

jaws or nothing.

 

I couldn't load anything bar jaws at university.

 

They simply wouldn't accept anything bar jaws.

 

On the other hand, if your work wants you to use jaws they should foot

the bill for it, and all upgrades, and smas, and if you suddenly have an

system upgrade and need to buy the same functionality again, then let

them pay the 600000 or so bucks for the privilage.

 

Not the users issue.

 

If they want to use a company with bad support, you just say I am not

paying for it, you pay or I just won't bother.

 

Users can not afford a lot of the access tech because governments and

organisations are paying for licences.

 

Dolphin stuff is affordable to some extent the rest naaah.

 

 

 

 

On 9/11/2017 7:52 p.m., Mike and Jenna wrote:

> Hi,

> I have to chime in here. My wife works for the government and they will not allow NVDA either. They said they do not allow anything on their systems ware you can get the code for it online because it forms a security risk for their systems. I love NVDA but can see due to the response form her IT department a hard line against letting NVDA into many government uses.

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee

> Sent: Thursday, November 9, 2017 1:15 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hi Sky,

> I'm sure Quentin will weigh on this more, but when you meet this person next month, can you ask him the following questions:

> * Please define "security".

> * So it was claimed that closed source products are more secure. There are tons of examples where open-source software might offer equal or better security, not because of openness of code, but due to potential to fix issues early on through contributions. What's your opinion on that?

> * Until a few years ago, using NVDA in professional setting was only a dream, but we're getting to a point where more organizations are choosing to use NVDA, and there are international examples out there. Do you have any comments on that?

> * So Window-Eyes was chosen due to "perceived improved security due to close-source nature of the program". What is more secure in 2017: unsupported program that people cannot offer quality security fixes on a timely manner, or an open-source product that does have community backing, including looking out for security problems?

> In case this person asks who and why these questions are asked, please tell him that a reputable NVDA developer asks these questions, and this developer is asking tough questions to get this person to think critically. If he asks, "why should I care or think critically", please tell him that thinking critically allows one to make better choices in the end, including policy decisions (yes, that's my debator side coming out). In the end, it would be much better (strategically) if you frame these questions as though you are asking them, because it also allows you to think carefully about what you are dealing with.

> Cheers,

> Joseph

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sky Mundell

> Sent: Wednesday, November 8, 2017 10:04 PM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hello. Let me check with him next month, and I'll get back to you on this subject.

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bhavya shah

> Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 10:02 PM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hi Sky,

> Before we debate the security of NVDA, I think we need to get the case of the library representative clarified. Firstly, what are the bases of this assertion that NVDA is less secure? Secondly, assuming that the claimant has the requisite technical knowhow, has he perused NVDA's source code to substantiate this claim? Thirdly, are there any specific security vulnerabilities or exploits present in NVDA that he can point us to?

> Unless the library representative can provide cogent responses to the above questions, or strengthen his claim by concrete evidence, I would dismiss such a comment as a misinformed and groundless one which holds no water.

> Thanks.

> On 11/9/17, Sky Mundell <skyt@...> wrote:

>> Hello All. Today, I was at our monthly technology meeting at a public

>> library here in Victoria, British Columbia, and NVDA was one of the

>> screen reading options discussed to a new participant who had low

>> vision. However, the tech at the library looked at it, and he told the

>> group that it was less secure, and they commented that it was better

>> for home use, rather than in corporate environments. Would NV Access

>> staffers like to comment on this issue, and what can be done to

>> address this issue? Because they were going to settle on the

>> Window-Eyes for office option back when it was being updated, but as

>> we all know it got discontinued and they did look at Window-Eyes as an

>> option and they were more in favour of it due to it not being Open

>> Source. They also did have JAWS for a time but got rid of it due to

>> lack of training and they would have had to spend money to get

>> somebody from FS to train them on it.  Any suggestions you guys could give me would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Sky.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

> --

> Best Regards

> Bhavya Shah

> Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

> Contacting Me

> E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@... Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125 Mobile Number: +91 7506221750

>

 

 

 

 

 


Re: nvda and skype

 

I think Skype 8 won't support XP; Microsoft ended XP support more than 3 years ago; NVDA 2017.4 will not support XP; even Jaws 16 and newer no longer supports XP.
Given that Windows 7 still has a few more years of extended support, Microsoft might continue to support the new Skype on Windows 7, but I'm not totally sure if that will be the case when the final version is released.
But what I think what needs to be done is that someone in the blindness community who is testing the preview needs to alert Microsoft about accessibility issues and needs to tell Microsoft how important Skype is for blind and visually impaired people who relied on screen readers.


Re: nvda and skype

 

how about supporting of skype8 for windows xp?
does skype 8 support xp or not?
i use version 7.37 without major problems now.

On 11/10/17, Supanut Leepaisomboon <supanut2000@outlook.com> wrote:
To be honest, I have accessibility issues on the new Skype 8 on iOS.
I don't know why Microsoft chose to sacrifice accessibility when developing
Skype 8.
But as of now I do not know whether Skype 8 is still in the preview stage
for Windows; and whether it's even compatible with Windows 7.
If you're on Windows 10 you can use the built-in Skype app; NVDA works with
it just fine; in fact I find the Windows 10 Skype app easier to navigate
than the Skype desktop app.
--
we have not sent you but as a mercy to the entire creation.
holy quran, chapter 21, verse 107.
in the very authentic narration from prophet Mohammad is:
indeed, imam husayn is the beacon of guidance and the ark of salvation.
best website for studying islamic book in different languages
www.al-islam.org


Re: nvda and skype

 

To be honest, I have accessibility issues on the new Skype 8 on iOS.
I don't know why Microsoft chose to sacrifice accessibility when developing Skype 8.
But as of now I do not know whether Skype 8 is still in the preview stage for Windows; and whether it's even compatible with Windows 7.
If you're on Windows 10 you can use the built-in Skype app; NVDA works with it just fine; in fact I find the Windows 10 Skype app easier to navigate than the Skype desktop app.


Re: NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Steve Nutt
 

Hi Tyler,

 

You hit another nail there, usability.  Currently, NVDA crashes all over the place in outlook 2016, I can’t even use it.

 

If I had to rely on it for my daily bread, the fix is a long time coming.  Whereas, in JAWS 2018, they have fixed it already.

 

So to some extent, you do get what you pay for.  The fixing of MS Outlook is obviously not a high enough priority with NVDA to push out a quick update.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: 09 November 2017 08:42
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Hi,

My workplace provided me with jaws.

Open source is nice, things get fixed, yes, but companies, especially government companies, want things that simply work and are well known and reliable. Also probably have an ongoing license with jaws, so why not use it?

Me personally, if I had a job requiring jaws, $125 every 2 years is hardly a drop in the bucket especially considering if the company pays for the license itself. Also for me, NVDA wasn’t usable in most of the cataloguing programs I worked in whereas jaws was. This was a few years back now, though, so things might change.

 

 

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: November 9, 2017 2:28 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

 

Sadly this is the curse as much as it is a blessing with opensource.

 

Look at blind extra, there is probably nothing to stop people modifying

nvda with a virus and releasing it as something else and tricking users.

 

I know we have a good security review of addons, but  what are ways we

can protect nvda if any from this.

 

Governments and such probably have a contract with vfo and need jaws

jaws or nothing.

 

I couldn't load anything bar jaws at university.

 

They simply wouldn't accept anything bar jaws.

 

On the other hand, if your work wants you to use jaws they should foot

the bill for it, and all upgrades, and smas, and if you suddenly have an

system upgrade and need to buy the same functionality again, then let

them pay the 600000 or so bucks for the privilage.

 

Not the users issue.

 

If they want to use a company with bad support, you just say I am not

paying for it, you pay or I just won't bother.

 

Users can not afford a lot of the access tech because governments and

organisations are paying for licences.

 

Dolphin stuff is affordable to some extent the rest naaah.

 

 

 

 

On 9/11/2017 7:52 p.m., Mike and Jenna wrote:

> Hi,

> I have to chime in here. My wife works for the government and they will not allow NVDA either. They said they do not allow anything on their systems ware you can get the code for it online because it forms a security risk for their systems. I love NVDA but can see due to the response form her IT department a hard line against letting NVDA into many government uses.

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee

> Sent: Thursday, November 9, 2017 1:15 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hi Sky,

> I'm sure Quentin will weigh on this more, but when you meet this person next month, can you ask him the following questions:

> * Please define "security".

> * So it was claimed that closed source products are more secure. There are tons of examples where open-source software might offer equal or better security, not because of openness of code, but due to potential to fix issues early on through contributions. What's your opinion on that?

> * Until a few years ago, using NVDA in professional setting was only a dream, but we're getting to a point where more organizations are choosing to use NVDA, and there are international examples out there. Do you have any comments on that?

> * So Window-Eyes was chosen due to "perceived improved security due to close-source nature of the program". What is more secure in 2017: unsupported program that people cannot offer quality security fixes on a timely manner, or an open-source product that does have community backing, including looking out for security problems?

> In case this person asks who and why these questions are asked, please tell him that a reputable NVDA developer asks these questions, and this developer is asking tough questions to get this person to think critically. If he asks, "why should I care or think critically", please tell him that thinking critically allows one to make better choices in the end, including policy decisions (yes, that's my debator side coming out). In the end, it would be much better (strategically) if you frame these questions as though you are asking them, because it also allows you to think carefully about what you are dealing with.

> Cheers,

> Joseph

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sky Mundell

> Sent: Wednesday, November 8, 2017 10:04 PM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hello. Let me check with him next month, and I'll get back to you on this subject.

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bhavya shah

> Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 10:02 PM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

> Hi Sky,

> Before we debate the security of NVDA, I think we need to get the case of the library representative clarified. Firstly, what are the bases of this assertion that NVDA is less secure? Secondly, assuming that the claimant has the requisite technical knowhow, has he perused NVDA's source code to substantiate this claim? Thirdly, are there any specific security vulnerabilities or exploits present in NVDA that he can point us to?

> Unless the library representative can provide cogent responses to the above questions, or strengthen his claim by concrete evidence, I would dismiss such a comment as a misinformed and groundless one which holds no water.

> Thanks.

> On 11/9/17, Sky Mundell <skyt@...> wrote:

>> Hello All. Today, I was at our monthly technology meeting at a public

>> library here in Victoria, British Columbia, and NVDA was one of the

>> screen reading options discussed to a new participant who had low

>> vision. However, the tech at the library looked at it, and he told the

>> group that it was less secure, and they commented that it was better

>> for home use, rather than in corporate environments. Would NV Access

>> staffers like to comment on this issue, and what can be done to

>> address this issue? Because they were going to settle on the

>> Window-Eyes for office option back when it was being updated, but as

>> we all know it got discontinued and they did look at Window-Eyes as an

>> option and they were more in favour of it due to it not being Open

>> Source. They also did have JAWS for a time but got rid of it due to

>> lack of training and they would have had to spend money to get

>> somebody from FS to train them on it.  Any suggestions you guys could give me would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Sky.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

> --

> Best Regards

> Bhavya Shah

> Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

> Contacting Me

> E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@... Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125 Mobile Number: +91 7506221750

>

 

 

 

 


Re: NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Steve Nutt
 

Yes, anything open source, can easily be modified, no reverse engineering needed.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike and Jenna
Sent: 09 November 2017 06:52
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Hi,

I have to chime in here. My wife works for the government and they will not allow NVDA either. They said they do not allow anything on their systems ware you can get the code for it online because it forms a security risk for their systems. I love NVDA but can see due to the response form her IT department a hard line against letting NVDA into many government uses.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, November 9, 2017 1:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Hi Sky,
I'm sure Quentin will weigh on this more, but when you meet this person next month, can you ask him the following questions:
* Please define "security".
* So it was claimed that closed source products are more secure. There are tons of examples where open-source software might offer equal or better security, not because of openness of code, but due to potential to fix issues early on through contributions. What's your opinion on that?
* Until a few years ago, using NVDA in professional setting was only a dream, but we're getting to a point where more organizations are choosing to use NVDA, and there are international examples out there. Do you have any comments on that?
* So Window-Eyes was chosen due to "perceived improved security due to close-source nature of the program". What is more secure in 2017: unsupported program that people cannot offer quality security fixes on a timely manner, or an open-source product that does have community backing, including looking out for security problems?
In case this person asks who and why these questions are asked, please tell him that a reputable NVDA developer asks these questions, and this developer is asking tough questions to get this person to think critically. If he asks, "why should I care or think critically", please tell him that thinking critically allows one to make better choices in the end, including policy decisions (yes, that's my debator side coming out). In the end, it would be much better (strategically) if you frame these questions as though you are asking them, because it also allows you to think carefully about what you are dealing with.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sky Mundell
Sent: Wednesday, November 8, 2017 10:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Hello. Let me check with him next month, and I'll get back to you on this subject.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bhavya shah
Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 10:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Hi Sky,
Before we debate the security of NVDA, I think we need to get the case of the library representative clarified. Firstly, what are the bases of this assertion that NVDA is less secure? Secondly, assuming that the claimant has the requisite technical knowhow, has he perused NVDA's source code to substantiate this claim? Thirdly, are there any specific security vulnerabilities or exploits present in NVDA that he can point us to?
Unless the library representative can provide cogent responses to the above questions, or strengthen his claim by concrete evidence, I would dismiss such a comment as a misinformed and groundless one which holds no water.
Thanks.

On 11/9/17, Sky Mundell <skyt@shaw.ca> wrote:
Hello All. Today, I was at our monthly technology meeting at a public
library here in Victoria, British Columbia, and NVDA was one of the
screen reading options discussed to a new participant who had low
vision. However, the tech at the library looked at it, and he told the
group that it was less secure, and they commented that it was better
for home use, rather than in corporate environments. Would NV Access
staffers like to comment on this issue, and what can be done to
address this issue? Because they were going to settle on the
Window-Eyes for office option back when it was being updated, but as
we all know it got discontinued and they did look at Window-Eyes as an
option and they were more in favour of it due to it not being Open
Source. They also did have JAWS for a time but got rid of it due to
lack of training and they would have had to spend money to get
somebody from FS to train them on it. Any suggestions you guys could give me would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Sky.





--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah

Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

Contacting Me
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125 Mobile Number: +91 7506221750


Re: NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

I would have thought the security aspect is obvious. Since it is open source, anyone has access to the code, and anyone can alter it. So I can understand workplace concerns.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bhavya shah
Sent: 09 November 2017 06:02
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA in the workforce and in public institutions

Hi Sky,
Before we debate the security of NVDA, I think we need to get the case of the library representative clarified. Firstly, what are the bases of this assertion that NVDA is less secure? Secondly, assuming that the claimant has the requisite technical knowhow, has he perused NVDA's source code to substantiate this claim? Thirdly, are there any specific security vulnerabilities or exploits present in NVDA that he can point us to?
Unless the library representative can provide cogent responses to the above questions, or strengthen his claim by concrete evidence, I would dismiss such a comment as a misinformed and groundless one which holds no water.
Thanks.

On 11/9/17, Sky Mundell <skyt@shaw.ca> wrote:
Hello All. Today, I was at our monthly technology meeting at a public
library here in Victoria, British Columbia, and NVDA was one of the
screen reading options discussed to a new participant who had low
vision. However, the tech at the library looked at it, and he told the
group that it was less secure, and they commented that it was better
for home use, rather than in corporate environments. Would NV Access
staffers like to comment on this issue, and what can be done to
address this issue? Because they were going to settle on the
Window-Eyes for office option back when it was being updated, but as
we all know it got discontinued and they did look at Window-Eyes as an
option and they were more in favour of it due to it not being Open
Source. They also did have JAWS for a time but got rid of it due to
lack of training and they would have had to spend money to get
somebody from FS to train them on it. Any suggestions you guys could give me would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Sky.





--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah

Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

Contacting Me
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125 Mobile Number: +91 7506221750


Re: NVDA and office 2016

Steve Nutt
 

Hi Quentin,

 

Now if we could persuade NVDA to stop crashing every time you change Outlook folders, Office would be usable again.

 

I know Freedom Sci had to hack around this problem with MS, something to do with UIA calls.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Quentin Christensen
Sent: 08 November 2017 22:58
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and office 2016

 

Hi Mary,

 

Office 2016 is in many ways similar to Office 2013.  NVDA works very well with both, and in a couple of cases, Microsoft have fixed bugs in 2016 so there are some things that work better.  I wrote the official NV Access training material for Microsoft Word and Excel using Office 2016.  The material itself works for Office 2010 to 2016 (I found in more cases I was noting a difference in the behaviour of Office 2010 compared to the other two, rather than a new difference in Office 2016).

 

If you are interested, our material is available from: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

 

Kind regards

 

Quentin.

 

On Thu, Nov 9, 2017 at 9:42 AM, Mary Otten <motten53@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I was just looking on Jean‘s website, Accessibility central.net, and there was a tutorial there for using Microsoft Word with NVDA. It mentioned office 2013. I have a friend who uses a different screen reader, and he also uses 2013. Is 2016 accessible? I hope so, because that seems to be the currently available version.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone



 

--

Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

 

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

 

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: PC will reboot when using NVDA

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I agree with this. It seems that often you will be able to generate this error with anything that uses the problem memory location. I'd suggest running a memcheck utility that writes to a file. I'm not sure what the current ones are though.
Often they work only if you ask the machine to boot up from a device like a CD etc, a as often windows itself can fall over and then you are no wiser.
Another thing I've done to prove there is a bad stick is to simply swap over the sticks and then failure tend to follow a different pattern. If you have enough memory on each chip just remove one at a time and see if the crashes continue, make sure you know which is which of course before switching them around!

In one case I discovered with a program that looks at the hardware that the two ram sticks were of different manufacture or speed and sometimes motherboards do not like the mismatch, but if its been OK then its probably one dodgy location.
However other things are possible including a problem with the decoding on the motherboard, malware or some program which is not well behaved and its overwriting memory its not supposed to. Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "P. Otter" <pam.otter@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 1:30 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] PC will reboot when using NVDA


hi, about 2 years ago i've had the same problem.
after searching there was one thing clear, there was a memory unit out of order.
when a memory unit is disfunctioning, it will generate a lot of strange error messages.
so, test your memory and replace the bad memory unit.
it is also possible that there is dust in the connector of the memory unit.
solution, disconnect your power, then open your computer, take out the memory units and clean them for example with a rubbereraser.
that works fine.
this methode works only when cause is dust or other junk is between the contacts of your memory unit and the connector on the motherboard.
else there is no other way then replace with a new one.
cheers
paul otter



Op 10-11-2017 om 10:29 schreef Wong Angel K F:
Hi,

When I open NVDA and type something in MS word or notepad, sometimes, the PC will be out of order or reboot.

Below error message will be shown on screen before Windows is closing.

"The instruction at 0xfd0e2390 referenced memory at 0x450e2396. The memory could not be read. Click on OK to terminate the program. Click on CANCEL to debug the program".

I have no idea how to fix it. Appreciate if anyone can help me.



Re: Question about using quick books with NVDA

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

There are JAWS scripts from http://www.myblindspot.com, but I know nothing of work with NVDA.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Kuzma via Groups.Io
Sent: 08 November 2017 10:20
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Question about using quick books with NVDA

 

Good morning,

I have used quickbooks as a sighted person,

But since lost my sight five years ago I have not tried it.

I do know they had an accessibility project a while back to make it accessible.

Not sure it was with jaws or nvda. You may want to give them a call as I remember it not being the latest and greatest version.

Let me know if you find anything out and if I am incorrect or not, and it I come across anything else will let you know.

Thanks

Rich

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 5:11 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Question about using quick books with NVDA

 

Good morning everyone.

 

I have a client who has just lost most of her vision. She worked as an accountant and used a program called quick books. In my experience we have had terrible success with screen readers and accounting software in the past. Does anyone know if this has changed. Can NVDA be made to work with quick books? If not, is there any accounting software that will work with NVdA, or any other screen reader? Thanks for any help you can give.

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Question about using quick books with NVDA

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

I would recommend Quickbooks Online as opposed to Quickbooks.  Although Quickbooks Online isn’t perfect, in terms of accessibility, it works better with NVDA than any other screen reader.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: 08 November 2017 10:11
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Question about using quick books with NVDA

 

Good morning everyone.

 

I have a client who has just lost most of her vision. She worked as an accountant and used a program called quick books. In my experience we have had terrible success with screen readers and accounting software in the past. Does anyone know if this has changed. Can NVDA be made to work with quick books? If not, is there any accounting software that will work with NVdA, or any other screen reader? Thanks for any help you can give.


Re: PC will reboot when using NVDA

P. Otter
 

hi, about 2 years ago i've had the same problem.
after searching there was one thing clear, there was a memory unit out of order.
when a memory unit is disfunctioning, it will generate a lot of strange error messages.
so, test your memory and replace the bad memory unit.
it is also possible that there is dust in the connector of the memory unit.
solution, disconnect your power, then open your computer, take out the memory units and clean them for example with a rubbereraser.
that works fine.
this methode works only when cause is dust or other junk is between the contacts of your memory unit and the connector on the motherboard.
else there is no other way then  replace with a new one.
cheers
paul otter



Op 10-11-2017 om 10:29 schreef Wong Angel K F:

Hi,

When I open NVDA and type something in MS word or notepad, sometimes, the PC will be out of order or reboot.

Below error message will be shown on screen before Windows is closing.

"The instruction at 0xfd0e2390 referenced memory at 0x450e2396. The memory could not be read. Click on OK to terminate the program. Click on CANCEL to debug the program".

I have no idea how to fix it. Appreciate if anyone can help me.


PC will reboot when using NVDA

Wong Angel K F <angelkf@...>
 

Hi,

When I open NVDA and type something in MS word or notepad, sometimes, the PC will be out of order or reboot.

Below error message will be shown on screen before Windows is closing.

"The instruction at 0xfd0e2390 referenced memory at 0x450e2396. The memory could not be read. Click on OK to terminate the program. Click on CANCEL to debug the program".

I have no idea how to fix it. Appreciate if anyone can help me.


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Re: NVDA Problems with dynamic content

Mallard <mallard@...>
 

Mine is set to True, but nothing changes.

Ciao,

Ollie

Il 10/11/2017 02:29, J.G ha scritto:
Hi,

try in about:config (using firefox obviously) change: accessibility.blockautorefresh to true. default is false.

regards, Jožef


Re: a question about some buttons on websites.

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I found the b for button single key worked well in ff52 32 bit. I never bother with 64 bit ff it always seemed slow and clunky to me.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Isige" <gwynn@tds.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 09, 2017 9:53 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] a question about some buttons on websites.


Firefox 56.0.2 64-bit, NVDA 2017.3, Windows 64-bit 1709 or the latest update. Works fine for me. I had to allow the main site and something called jwplatform.com before the player showed up, in case you're disabling scripts for security. The video player kind of jumps around, I had to arrow through it a couple of times to find the play button once it was running for example, that's also how you pause it, but once I enabled those two scripts I just found it and hit space on the play button, no problem.


Re: firefox navigational sounds replacement

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Is there going to be any changes to the skype protocol, if not any reason not to simply use old versions?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 4:46 AM
Subject: [nvda] firefox navigational sounds replacement


Hi.

had a look for something to replace the out dated navsounds addon.

The most promising is one called noise which appears to have more, more events and aparently more functionality.

So we will have to see, at least thats a start.

The next project to tackle is the cross platform skype upgrade which is chromium based and is full of crazyness not fully accessible to all systems and well its a big web program ug.

I was hoping skype classic would stay.