Date   

Re: How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Mary Otten <motten53@...>
 

I kept it.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 30, 2017, at 10:00 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I intended to write another message if you were interested but I then decided to put the instructions in the message I sent.  I forgot to take out the line about sending instructions in another message.  So if you keep reading after I said I'd send them in another message, you will find them in the message I already sent.  If you didn't keep it, I'll send it again.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Otten
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 11:18 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Hi Jean,
Yes, I want to stop Firefox from prohibiting certain redirections, and I tried alt a, to no know hi Jean,
Yes, I want to stop certainly directions, and I tried all day, to no avail. The only way I got it  was for my husband to go find it with a mouse and hit the allow which then let the site I was on redirect to a site that I wanted it to go to. I don’t want to get rid of the notification all together, because I like stopping unwanted  redirections. But in this case, it was supposed to be redirected. As for the password thing, yes, I would appreciate directions on how to stop it from asking.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 30, 2017, at 8:29 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

Do you mean stop redirection notices?  Alt a is announced as the allow command at the end of the announcement.  If you want to turn off the notification completely, I'll write instructions in another message. 
 
To tell Firefox not to offer to remember passwords, do the following.
New main steps start on new lines:
Alt t then o to open options. 
After waiting a moment, tab once.  You are now in a list of categories.
Start down arrowing until you get to security.
If down arrowing stops moving you before you get there, up arrow once then continue down arrowing.
Once you get to security, start tabbing until you get to a checkbox that says something like remember logins.  Uncheck it with the space bar.  You won't be asked any longer.
There is no ok button in this dialog-like structure.  Settings take immediate effect.  This is a web page in the browser and since you are on a web page that mimics a dialog, do whatever you want to do that you would do while on a web page after you change the setting.  That is, go to another page by using a book mark, close the browser, etc.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Otten
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 9:59 AM
Subject: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

I am using the extended service release of Firefox on windows 10 machine with the stable release of NVDA. Sometimes Firefox will put up notices, such as when it offers to remember passwords or when it informs you that has blocked a redirection from the site. How can I access these in order to either tell it I don’t want it to save a password or that I do wanted to allow a redirection?
Mary


Sent from my iPhone



Re: How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Gene
 

I intended to write another message if you were interested but I then decided to put the instructions in the message I sent.  I forgot to take out the line about sending instructions in another message.  So if you keep reading after I said I'd send them in another message, you will find them in the message I already sent.  If you didn't keep it, I'll send it again.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Otten
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 11:18 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Hi Jean,
Yes, I want to stop Firefox from prohibiting certain redirections, and I tried alt a, to no know hi Jean,
Yes, I want to stop certainly directions, and I tried all day, to no avail. The only way I got it  was for my husband to go find it with a mouse and hit the allow which then let the site I was on redirect to a site that I wanted it to go to. I don’t want to get rid of the notification all together, because I like stopping unwanted  redirections. But in this case, it was supposed to be redirected. As for the password thing, yes, I would appreciate directions on how to stop it from asking.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 30, 2017, at 8:29 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

Do you mean stop redirection notices?  Alt a is announced as the allow command at the end of the announcement.  If you want to turn off the notification completely, I'll write instructions in another message. 
 
To tell Firefox not to offer to remember passwords, do the following.
New main steps start on new lines:
Alt t then o to open options. 
After waiting a moment, tab once.  You are now in a list of categories.
Start down arrowing until you get to security.
If down arrowing stops moving you before you get there, up arrow once then continue down arrowing.
Once you get to security, start tabbing until you get to a checkbox that says something like remember logins.  Uncheck it with the space bar.  You won't be asked any longer.
There is no ok button in this dialog-like structure.  Settings take immediate effect.  This is a web page in the browser and since you are on a web page that mimics a dialog, do whatever you want to do that you would do while on a web page after you change the setting.  That is, go to another page by using a book mark, close the browser, etc.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Otten
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 9:59 AM
Subject: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

I am using the extended service release of Firefox on windows 10 machine with the stable release of NVDA. Sometimes Firefox will put up notices, such as when it offers to remember passwords or when it informs you that has blocked a redirection from the site. How can I access these in order to either tell it I don’t want it to save a password or that I do wanted to allow a redirection?
Mary


Sent from my iPhone



Re: After unistall Office 2016 with Microsoft Removal Tool nvda don't work fine

Alessandro Albano
 

Hi all,
this mornig, I have reinstalled Office 2016 and all now work fine.
This bug is very dangerous for all!
Thanks all for the replay!


Re: OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

Tyler Wood
 

This summarizes exactly how I feel today.

I shouldn’t need a crazy fast machine. However, when I’m on a machine with a mechanical hard drive or slower processor, I can tell the difference the second I start using it. It still functions, but my general assumptions get in the way. I get impatient. Come on, move already!

This is why I went overboard in my new desktop, which should arrive in December. Dell xps 8930 with a core i7 processor. I may not need it, but with the advancements in computer technology and how screen readers are, instead of becoming lighter on processor usage, are seemingly more dependant on them, I figure I should get as much power as I can while I can. My thoughts are a core i3 processor, 8 gb of ram and a decent solid state drive should get you where you want to go. The problem is when you want more than a 128 gb drive. You have to pay for the i5 or i7 processor, thus making the machine even more expensive. Also, in 5 years, that i3 may be ancient history. It seems things are taking off at breakneck speed rather than slowing down as far as advancing goes. Soon all applications are going to be multithreaded if they’re not already and you want as many threads as you can squeeze out of it in the future. Dual core with hyperthreading just isn’t going to cut it in even 4 years – and if it does, it’s going to be on the edge of it. Maybe this is just my paranoia talking, but you never know.

 

 

From: Deborah Armstrong
Sent: November 30, 2017 10:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

 

** This was also cross-posted to Cavi-discuss ***

 

As a screen reader user, I'm finding selecting a new laptop is more difficult than ever before. I'm very curious to see what others think, so please post your thoughts.

 

It used to be that I didn't feel I needed a super fast computer, because I wasn't editing video. And nowadays if you look at reviews of laptops, you'll see that people who edit photos, use CAD systems, create art or engage in heavy gaming need fast machines. But for those who just surf the web, read email and do some light word processing, reviewers maintain that a slower and cheaper laptop will work just fine. In fact, reviews of chromebooks are often mixed in with reviews of inexpensive Windows laptops for just that reason.

 

In 2012 my Acer netbook (An AO-756) was the fastest ultraportable I could buy for under $500. Its processor, a 1.4GHZ Intel Celeron 877 was a dual core from the Sandy Bridge family -- the slowest one in that family, but it wasn't a much slower Atom.    It had a reasonable fast 500GB hard drive. I added 8GB of RAM making it even more useful at running multiple tasks efficiently. I could use Word, Excel and Outlook without latency and of course I did a lot of web surfing. Compared to the computers at work, it was a bit slower, but like the reviewers said, it didn't matter, since I didn't do computation-heavy tasks at home.

 

What's changed today might best be covered in this post:

    https://www.marcozehe.de/2017/09/29/rethinking-web-accessibility-on-windows/

 

which discusses how screen readers access the web. Today, if I have to work with a dynamic website, my little ACER is unbearably slow, despite my having carefully maintained it so it doesn't run unnecessary background tasks, and so that Windows is regularly fully refreshed. 

 

I am convinced the problem is not so much that the PC is slow, but that the screen reader has become a palace built on a shack's foundation. It needs everything it can squeeze out of the processor to handle the new, dynamic web. Seems both NVDA and JAWS fail miserably on slower processors.

 

But if a task does not depend on a screen reader, the machine is still fairly fast.  For example, when I OCR something in Kurzweil 1000, the laptop is just as fast as my much more powerful desktop computers at work. And running something like Handbrake is indeed slower on my laptop but not so slow it cannot be used. A video that takes an hour to convert on my desktop at work might take fifteen extra minutes on the laptop. Handbrake is often used as an informal benchmarking tool.

 

But where instant responsiveness counts, my Netbook falls short. I expect to hear something when I press a key. Often, today, I don't -- seems like I am always waiting for the screen reader to pull itself together and find the focus, or cope with a dynamic partial page refresh, or the next column in the spreadsheet, or read my next email in Thunderbird.

 

The Acer actually got fractionally faster when I upgraded to Windows 10, but even so, I mostly wait after pressing a key to hear something read back to me.

 

My work computers which run Core i7 Pentiums respond immediately, even though they are saddled with far more background tasks required by my job.

 

So if I were to trust reviews, this claim that for the kinds of things I do at home on the laptop I don't need a very powerful machine, I'd buy something with an Atom processor, a 128GB SSD and 2GB of RAM. Clearly that would result in a machine that's even slower than my existing laptop. Plus, it would have a quarter of the storage!

 

I guess the dilemma I'm struggling with here is how to avoid spending a fortune and still get an ultraportable that has no latency when I use a screen reader.

 

What do others think?

 

--Debee

 


Re: How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Mary Otten <motten53@...>
 

Hi Jean,
Yes, I want to stop Firefox from prohibiting certain redirections, and I tried alt a, to no know hi Jean,
Yes, I want to stop certainly directions, and I tried all day, to no avail. The only way I got it  was for my husband to go find it with a mouse and hit the allow which then let the site I was on redirect to a site that I wanted it to go to. I don’t want to get rid of the notification all together, because I like stopping unwanted  redirections. But in this case, it was supposed to be redirected. As for the password thing, yes, I would appreciate directions on how to stop it from asking.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 30, 2017, at 8:29 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

Do you mean stop redirection notices?  Alt a is announced as the allow command at the end of the announcement.  If you want to turn off the notification completely, I'll write instructions in another message. 
 
To tell Firefox not to offer to remember passwords, do the following.
New main steps start on new lines:
Alt t then o to open options. 
After waiting a moment, tab once.  You are now in a list of categories.
Start down arrowing until you get to security.
If down arrowing stops moving you before you get there, up arrow once then continue down arrowing.
Once you get to security, start tabbing until you get to a checkbox that says something like remember logins.  Uncheck it with the space bar.  You won't be asked any longer.
There is no ok button in this dialog-like structure.  Settings take immediate effect.  This is a web page in the browser and since you are on a web page that mimics a dialog, do whatever you want to do that you would do while on a web page after you change the setting.  That is, go to another page by using a book mark, close the browser, etc.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Otten
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 9:59 AM
Subject: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

I am using the extended service release of Firefox on windows 10 machine with the stable release of NVDA. Sometimes Firefox will put up notices, such as when it offers to remember passwords or when it informs you that has blocked a redirection from the site. How can I access these in order to either tell it I don’t want it to save a password or that I do wanted to allow a redirection?
Mary


Sent from my iPhone



Re: installing 2017-4 RC3

Brian's Mail list account
 

Yes others have said this, but then it suddenly appears. I've seen these discussions on the github issues.
I suspect that with all these fast and furious windows updates, things are not being checked by Microsoft very well.
What next, the Win 10 trainspotters update, perhaps? :-)
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris" <chrismedley@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 3:10 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


Its strange or maybe not so but it opens the ease of access section of the settings app but they does not seem to be any reference to nvda in there at all as far as i can see


From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: 30 November 2017 14:55
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

Well I seemed to recall this was the case for an earlier reporter and was
just trying to find some common denominator. Could it be somehow related,
but who knows. Otherwise as nothing has changed could the mismatch of not
selected in the temp copy mean that it gets configured when setting it up to
use the same shortcut and copies the settings incorrectly somewhere?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris" <chrismedley@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 11:45 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


This happened to me when i installed rc2
And i use caps lock as the nvda key along with insert
But i don’t see the significance of this though


From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: 30 November 2017 10:23
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

As a matter of interest do you use caps lock as the nvda key?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:00 AM
Subject: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


Used the check for updates under the help of the NVDA UI. Installed RC 3
over RC2. For some reason during the update the Windows 10 settings
screen opened and was showing the settings for Narrator. Never seen this
happen before. Doesn't seem to have caused any issues with the update
just strange that it happened.




Re: How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Brian's Mail list account
 

Bloomin heck I cannot get Firefox to remember them in the first place!
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 4:29 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA


Do you mean stop redirection notices? Alt a is announced as the allow command at the end of the announcement. If you want to turn off the notification completely, I'll write instructions in another message.

To tell Firefox not to offer to remember passwords, do the following.
New main steps start on new lines:
Alt t then o to open options.
After waiting a moment, tab once. You are now in a list of categories.
Start down arrowing until you get to security.
If down arrowing stops moving you before you get there, up arrow once then continue down arrowing.
Once you get to security, start tabbing until you get to a checkbox that says something like remember logins. Uncheck it with the space bar. You won't be asked any longer.
There is no ok button in this dialog-like structure. Settings take immediate effect. This is a web page in the browser and since you are on a web page that mimics a dialog, do whatever you want to do that you would do while on a web page after you change the setting. That is, go to another page by using a book mark, close the browser, etc.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Mary Otten
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 9:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA


I am using the extended service release of Firefox on windows 10 machine with the stable release of NVDA. Sometimes Firefox will put up notices, such as when it offers to remember passwords or when it informs you that has blocked a redirection from the site. How can I access these in order to either tell it I don’t want it to save a password or that I do wanted to allow a redirection?
Mary


Sent from my iPhone


Re: OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

Brian's Mail list account
 

Well I'm about to embark on this myself, so this is interesting. I guess it depends what you do and where the slow down happens.
Using my current desktop I find an I5 four core and 8 gigs of ram with the 250gig ssd is pretty good on the web with nvda. Yes some sites can be extra slow, but to me this seems to be that some idiot has decided to code the web site that way. I do not need to access the slowest sites, strangely these seem to be newspapers sites, and I suspect that this is all the scripts and ads on them. Some do allow you to more or less run them with scripts off and ad blockers on and they then work much faster.
Unfortunately with this current trend toward UIA and how slow this is in Windows at the moment, and the trend toward browsers that do not allow screenreaders to hook into them and hence have to resort to a slower way of doing things its obvious to me that your item here is probably going to end up being correct eventually. I mean we have already just seen nvda have to remove a feature as at present the only way to make it work slowed some software down too much. Unfortunately Narrator is not the answer either as it seems to be slow all the time to me.
Its much as it has always been in the beginning, we had 8 bit machines that ran what we wanted to run and some even had voices. and as we have gone along with more complexity, speeds memory, storage graphics etc have all had to increase as these days its impossible to hand code in assembler for fast code so everyone relies on compiled languages which use stock routines to do stuff and interface with the main code DLLs of windows or whatever.
Now of course we also often need a keyboard with more keys than the average laptop has, and we need to often turn off the current trend in using the function keys as controls for monitors or shortcuts for internal laptop things.
The world on the one hand is becoming more accessible in some ways, but also very complex and in the case of computers, our usage is so specialised nobody actually tests mainstream computers with access software running to do common tasks, they are all paired down to a price point.
I shall have to see what I end up with, but if anything interesting is found, I'll post it for others, but as with many things, some will undoubtedly disagree and say, no do it this way.
I'd like a numeric keypad on the keyboard, as I hate too many multi use keys and concert pianist key combinations. I'm not the young guy I was and its no use pretending I'm as good at this as I was!
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Deborah Armstrong" <debee@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 4:26 PM
Subject: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before


** This was also cross-posted to Cavi-discuss ***

As a screen reader user, I'm finding selecting a new laptop is more difficult than ever before. I'm very curious to see what others think, so please post your thoughts.

It used to be that I didn't feel I needed a super fast computer, because I wasn't editing video. And nowadays if you look at reviews of laptops, you'll see that people who edit photos, use CAD systems, create art or engage in heavy gaming need fast machines. But for those who just surf the web, read email and do some light word processing, reviewers maintain that a slower and cheaper laptop will work just fine. In fact, reviews of chromebooks are often mixed in with reviews of inexpensive Windows laptops for just that reason.

In 2012 my Acer netbook (An AO-756) was the fastest ultraportable I could buy for under $500. Its processor, a 1.4GHZ Intel Celeron 877 was a dual core from the Sandy Bridge family -- the slowest one in that family, but it wasn't a much slower Atom. It had a reasonable fast 500GB hard drive. I added 8GB of RAM making it even more useful at running multiple tasks efficiently. I could use Word, Excel and Outlook without latency and of course I did a lot of web surfing. Compared to the computers at work, it was a bit slower, but like the reviewers said, it didn't matter, since I didn't do computation-heavy tasks at home.

What's changed today might best be covered in this post:
https://www.marcozehe.de/2017/09/29/rethinking-web-accessibility-on-windows/

which discusses how screen readers access the web. Today, if I have to work with a dynamic website, my little ACER is unbearably slow, despite my having carefully maintained it so it doesn't run unnecessary background tasks, and so that Windows is regularly fully refreshed.

I am convinced the problem is not so much that the PC is slow, but that the screen reader has become a palace built on a shack's foundation. It needs everything it can squeeze out of the processor to handle the new, dynamic web. Seems both NVDA and JAWS fail miserably on slower processors.

But if a task does not depend on a screen reader, the machine is still fairly fast. For example, when I OCR something in Kurzweil 1000, the laptop is just as fast as my much more powerful desktop computers at work. And running something like Handbrake is indeed slower on my laptop but not so slow it cannot be used. A video that takes an hour to convert on my desktop at work might take fifteen extra minutes on the laptop. Handbrake is often used as an informal benchmarking tool.

But where instant responsiveness counts, my Netbook falls short. I expect to hear something when I press a key. Often, today, I don't -- seems like I am always waiting for the screen reader to pull itself together and find the focus, or cope with a dynamic partial page refresh, or the next column in the spreadsheet, or read my next email in Thunderbird.

The Acer actually got fractionally faster when I upgraded to Windows 10, but even so, I mostly wait after pressing a key to hear something read back to me.

My work computers which run Core i7 Pentiums respond immediately, even though they are saddled with far more background tasks required by my job.

So if I were to trust reviews, this claim that for the kinds of things I do at home on the laptop I don't need a very powerful machine, I'd buy something with an Atom processor, a 128GB SSD and 2GB of RAM. Clearly that would result in a machine that's even slower than my existing laptop. Plus, it would have a quarter of the storage!

I guess the dilemma I'm struggling with here is how to avoid spending a fortune and still get an ultraportable that has no latency when I use a screen reader.

What do others think?

--Debee


Re: OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

Gene
 

I don't have the technical knowledge to answer your question.  If this isn't useful to you, it may be to others.  Have you tried using sites with scripting turned off?  If you don't need it on to do what you want to do on a site, the site may be faster and more responsive.  Also, what browser are you using?  Some people say one or another browser is faster.  I'm not sure that is correct or, if it is for some people, I'm not at all sure it is for all users.  But those are things you might want to experiment with.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 10:26 AM
Subject: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

** This was also cross-posted to Cavi-discuss ***
 
As a screen reader user, I'm finding selecting a new laptop is more difficult than ever before. I'm very curious to see what others think, so please post your thoughts.
 
It used to be that I didn't feel I needed a super fast computer, because I wasn't editing video. And nowadays if you look at reviews of laptops, you'll see that people who edit photos, use CAD systems, create art or engage in heavy gaming need fast machines. But for those who just surf the web, read email and do some light word processing, reviewers maintain that a slower and cheaper laptop will work just fine. In fact, reviews of chromebooks are often mixed in with reviews of inexpensive Windows laptops for just that reason.
 
In 2012 my Acer netbook (An AO-756) was the fastest ultraportable I could buy for under $500. Its processor, a 1.4GHZ Intel Celeron 877 was a dual core from the Sandy Bridge family -- the slowest one in that family, but it wasn't a much slower Atom.    It had a reasonable fast 500GB hard drive. I added 8GB of RAM making it even more useful at running multiple tasks efficiently. I could use Word, Excel and Outlook without latency and of course I did a lot of web surfing. Compared to the computers at work, it was a bit slower, but like the reviewers said, it didn't matter, since I didn't do computation-heavy tasks at home.
 
What's changed today might best be covered in this post:
    https://www.marcozehe.de/2017/09/29/rethinking-web-accessibility-on-windows/
 
which discusses how screen readers access the web. Today, if I have to work with a dynamic website, my little ACER is unbearably slow, despite my having carefully maintained it so it doesn't run unnecessary background tasks, and so that Windows is regularly fully refreshed. 
 
I am convinced the problem is not so much that the PC is slow, but that the screen reader has become a palace built on a shack's foundation. It needs everything it can squeeze out of the processor to handle the new, dynamic web. Seems both NVDA and JAWS fail miserably on slower processors.
 
But if a task does not depend on a screen reader, the machine is still fairly fast.  For example, when I OCR something in Kurzweil 1000, the laptop is just as fast as my much more powerful desktop computers at work. And running something like Handbrake is indeed slower on my laptop but not so slow it cannot be used. A video that takes an hour to convert on my desktop at work might take fifteen extra minutes on the laptop. Handbrake is often used as an informal benchmarking tool.
 
But where instant responsiveness counts, my Netbook falls short. I expect to hear something when I press a key. Often, today, I don't -- seems like I am always waiting for the screen reader to pull itself together and find the focus, or cope with a dynamic partial page refresh, or the next column in the spreadsheet, or read my next email in Thunderbird.
 
The Acer actually got fractionally faster when I upgraded to Windows 10, but even so, I mostly wait after pressing a key to hear something read back to me.
 
My work computers which run Core i7 Pentiums respond immediately, even though they are saddled with far more background tasks required by my job.
 
So if I were to trust reviews, this claim that for the kinds of things I do at home on the laptop I don't need a very powerful machine, I'd buy something with an Atom processor, a 128GB SSD and 2GB of RAM. Clearly that would result in a machine that's even slower than my existing laptop. Plus, it would have a quarter of the storage!
 
I guess the dilemma I'm struggling with here is how to avoid spending a fortune and still get an ultraportable that has no latency when I use a screen reader.
 
What do others think?
 
--Debee


Re: How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Gene
 

Do you mean stop redirection notices?  Alt a is announced as the allow command at the end of the announcement.  If you want to turn off the notification completely, I'll write instructions in another message. 
 
To tell Firefox not to offer to remember passwords, do the following.
New main steps start on new lines:
Alt t then o to open options. 
After waiting a moment, tab once.  You are now in a list of categories.
Start down arrowing until you get to security.
If down arrowing stops moving you before you get there, up arrow once then continue down arrowing.
Once you get to security, start tabbing until you get to a checkbox that says something like remember logins.  Uncheck it with the space bar.  You won't be asked any longer.
There is no ok button in this dialog-like structure.  Settings take immediate effect.  This is a web page in the browser and since you are on a web page that mimics a dialog, do whatever you want to do that you would do while on a web page after you change the setting.  That is, go to another page by using a book mark, close the browser, etc.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Otten
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 9:59 AM
Subject: [nvda] How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

I am using the extended service release of Firefox on windows 10 machine with the stable release of NVDA. Sometimes Firefox will put up notices, such as when it offers to remember passwords or when it informs you that has blocked a redirection from the site. How can I access these in order to either tell it I don’t want it to save a password or that I do wanted to allow a redirection?
Mary


Sent from my iPhone



OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

Deborah Armstrong <debee@...>
 

** This was also cross-posted to Cavi-discuss ***
 
As a screen reader user, I'm finding selecting a new laptop is more difficult than ever before. I'm very curious to see what others think, so please post your thoughts.
 
It used to be that I didn't feel I needed a super fast computer, because I wasn't editing video. And nowadays if you look at reviews of laptops, you'll see that people who edit photos, use CAD systems, create art or engage in heavy gaming need fast machines. But for those who just surf the web, read email and do some light word processing, reviewers maintain that a slower and cheaper laptop will work just fine. In fact, reviews of chromebooks are often mixed in with reviews of inexpensive Windows laptops for just that reason.
 
In 2012 my Acer netbook (An AO-756) was the fastest ultraportable I could buy for under $500. Its processor, a 1.4GHZ Intel Celeron 877 was a dual core from the Sandy Bridge family -- the slowest one in that family, but it wasn't a much slower Atom.    It had a reasonable fast 500GB hard drive. I added 8GB of RAM making it even more useful at running multiple tasks efficiently. I could use Word, Excel and Outlook without latency and of course I did a lot of web surfing. Compared to the computers at work, it was a bit slower, but like the reviewers said, it didn't matter, since I didn't do computation-heavy tasks at home.
 
What's changed today might best be covered in this post:
    https://www.marcozehe.de/2017/09/29/rethinking-web-accessibility-on-windows/
 
which discusses how screen readers access the web. Today, if I have to work with a dynamic website, my little ACER is unbearably slow, despite my having carefully maintained it so it doesn't run unnecessary background tasks, and so that Windows is regularly fully refreshed. 
 
I am convinced the problem is not so much that the PC is slow, but that the screen reader has become a palace built on a shack's foundation. It needs everything it can squeeze out of the processor to handle the new, dynamic web. Seems both NVDA and JAWS fail miserably on slower processors.
 
But if a task does not depend on a screen reader, the machine is still fairly fast.  For example, when I OCR something in Kurzweil 1000, the laptop is just as fast as my much more powerful desktop computers at work. And running something like Handbrake is indeed slower on my laptop but not so slow it cannot be used. A video that takes an hour to convert on my desktop at work might take fifteen extra minutes on the laptop. Handbrake is often used as an informal benchmarking tool.
 
But where instant responsiveness counts, my Netbook falls short. I expect to hear something when I press a key. Often, today, I don't -- seems like I am always waiting for the screen reader to pull itself together and find the focus, or cope with a dynamic partial page refresh, or the next column in the spreadsheet, or read my next email in Thunderbird.
 
The Acer actually got fractionally faster when I upgraded to Windows 10, but even so, I mostly wait after pressing a key to hear something read back to me.
 
My work computers which run Core i7 Pentiums respond immediately, even though they are saddled with far more background tasks required by my job.
 
So if I were to trust reviews, this claim that for the kinds of things I do at home on the laptop I don't need a very powerful machine, I'd buy something with an Atom processor, a 128GB SSD and 2GB of RAM. Clearly that would result in a machine that's even slower than my existing laptop. Plus, it would have a quarter of the storage!
 
I guess the dilemma I'm struggling with here is how to avoid spending a fortune and still get an ultraportable that has no latency when I use a screen reader.
 
What do others think?
 
--Debee


How to access Firefox notifications with NVDA

Mary Otten <motten53@...>
 

I am using the extended service release of Firefox on windows 10 machine with the stable release of NVDA. Sometimes Firefox will put up notices, such as when it offers to remember passwords or when it informs you that has blocked a redirection from the site. How can I access these in order to either tell it I don’t want it to save a password or that I do wanted to allow a redirection?
Mary


Sent from my iPhone


Re: installing 2017-4 RC3

Chris
 

With rc1 i downloaded the full installer but with rc2 and rc3 i forced a check for updates on those occasions

And updated from there

 

 

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: 30 November 2017 15:06
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

 

The only other thing I can think of is, did you all allow an auto prompt of

an update  take place or did you go in to the menu and force a poll of the

site?

 

That way around you had to have had an nvda menu option opened when the

update occurred.

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal email to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 2:02 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

 

 

> No I don't use the caps lock key.

> On 11/30/2017 4:23 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:

>> As a matter of interest do you use caps lock as the nvda key?

>> Brian

>> 

>> bglists@...

>> Sent via blueyonder.

>> Please address personal email to:-

>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

>> in the display name field.

>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>

>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>> Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:00 AM

>> Subject: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

>> 

>> 

>>> Used the check for updates under the help of the NVDA UI. Installed RC 3

>>> over RC2. For some reason during the update the Windows 10 settings

>>> screen opened and was showing the settings for Narrator.  Never seen

>>> this happen before. Doesn't seem to have caused any issues with the

>>> update just strange that it happened.

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>

>

 

 

 

 


Re: installing 2017-4 RC3

Chris
 

Its strange or maybe not so but it opens the ease of access section of the settings app but they does not seem to be any reference to nvda in there at all as far as i can see

 

 

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: 30 November 2017 14:55
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

 

Well I seemed to recall this was the case for an earlier reporter and was

just trying to find some common denominator. Could it be somehow related,

but who knows. Otherwise as nothing has changed could the mismatch of not

selected in the temp copy mean that it gets configured when setting it up to

use the same shortcut and copies the settings incorrectly somewhere?

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal email to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Chris" <chrismedley@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 11:45 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

 

 

This happened to me when i installed rc2

And i use caps lock as the nvda key along with insert

But i don’t see the significance of this though

 

 

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io

Sent: 30 November 2017 10:23

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

 

As a matter of interest do you use caps lock as the nvda key?

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal email to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:00 AM

Subject: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

 

 

> Used the check for updates under the help of the NVDA UI.  Installed RC 3

> over RC2.  For some reason during the update the Windows 10 settings

> screen opened and was showing the settings for Narrator.  Never seen this

> happen before.  Doesn't seem to have caused any issues with the update

> just strange that it happened.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: installing 2017-4 RC3

Brian's Mail list account
 

The only other thing I can think of is, did you all allow an auto prompt of an update take place or did you go in to the menu and force a poll of the site?

That way around you had to have had an nvda menu option opened when the update occurred.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 2:02 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


No I don't use the caps lock key.

On 11/30/2017 4:23 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
As a matter of interest do you use caps lock as the nvda key?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:00 AM
Subject: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


Used the check for updates under the help of the NVDA UI. Installed RC 3 over RC2. For some reason during the update the Windows 10 settings screen opened and was showing the settings for Narrator. Never seen this happen before. Doesn't seem to have caused any issues with the update just strange that it happened.









Re: installing 2017-4 RC3

Brian's Mail list account
 

Oh well two out of three then. I certainly am not seeing this on windows 7.
There is something to be said about not being up to date sometimes.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 2:02 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


No I don't use the caps lock key.

On 11/30/2017 4:23 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
As a matter of interest do you use caps lock as the nvda key?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:00 AM
Subject: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


Used the check for updates under the help of the NVDA UI. Installed RC 3 over RC2. For some reason during the update the Windows 10 settings screen opened and was showing the settings for Narrator. Never seen this happen before. Doesn't seem to have caused any issues with the update just strange that it happened.









Re: NVDA 2017.4rc3 released #nvdasr

Brian's Mail list account
 

And there was one time when the release itself needed an update to version xxxx.x.x as well.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rui Fontes" <rui.fontes@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 12:07 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4rc3 released #NVDAsr


It is not the first time...

If I am not mistaken, once it have gone untill RC4...


Rui



Às 01:53 de 30/11/2017, Shaun Everiss escreveu:
Also I think this is the first time we have ever gone to rc3 its not
often.

How close are we from release, I guess once there are no more bugs.




On 30/11/2017 1:47 p.m., Quentin Christensen wrote:
Hi everyone,

They say the best things come in threes and now NVDA 2017.4rc3 is
available
for testing! Coincidence? Probably, but in any case, this release fixes
performance issues in applications such as MIRC which draw a lot of
text to
the screen. For the full details of what is new, and to download the new
build, head to: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nvda-2017-4rc3-released/

Kind regards

Quentin.
#NVDAsr



.


Re: installing 2017-4 RC3

Brian's Mail list account
 

Well I seemed to recall this was the case for an earlier reporter and was just trying to find some common denominator. Could it be somehow related, but who knows. Otherwise as nothing has changed could the mismatch of not selected in the temp copy mean that it gets configured when setting it up to use the same shortcut and copies the settings incorrectly somewhere?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris" <chrismedley@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 11:45 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


This happened to me when i installed rc2
And i use caps lock as the nvda key along with insert
But i don’t see the significance of this though


From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: 30 November 2017 10:23
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

As a matter of interest do you use caps lock as the nvda key?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:00 AM
Subject: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3


Used the check for updates under the help of the NVDA UI. Installed RC 3
over RC2. For some reason during the update the Windows 10 settings
screen opened and was showing the settings for Narrator. Never seen this
happen before. Doesn't seem to have caused any issues with the update
just strange that it happened.




Re: installing 2017-4 RC3

Don H
 

No I don't use the caps lock key.

On 11/30/2017 4:23 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
As a matter of interest do you use caps lock as the nvda key?
Brian
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Don H" <lmddh50@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:00 AM
Subject: [nvda] installing 2017-4 RC3

Used the check for updates under the help of the NVDA UI.  Installed RC 3 over RC2.  For some reason during the update the Windows 10 settings screen opened and was showing the settings for Narrator. Never seen this happen before.  Doesn't seem to have caused any issues with the update just strange that it happened.




Re: NVDA 2017.4rc3 released #nvdasr

Rui Fontes
 

It is not the first time...

If I am not mistaken, once it have gone untill RC4...


Rui



Às 01:53 de 30/11/2017, Shaun Everiss escreveu:

Also I think this is the first time we have ever gone to rc3 its not often.

How close are we from release, I guess once there are no more bugs.




On 30/11/2017 1:47 p.m., Quentin Christensen wrote:
Hi everyone,

They say the best things come in threes and now NVDA 2017.4rc3 is available
for testing! Coincidence? Probably, but in any case, this release fixes
performance issues in applications such as MIRC which draw a lot of text to
the screen. For the full details of what is new, and to download the new
build, head to: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nvda-2017-4rc3-released/

Kind regards

Quentin.
#NVDAsr




.


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