Date   

Can NVDA 2017.4 run on Windows IOT?

Pranav Lal
 

Hi all,

Given that NVDA now supports arm 64 windows, can it run on Windows IOT
running on a raspberry pi 3?

Pranav


Re: NVDA not starting after login under windows 10

George McCoy <slr1bpz@...>
 

        Thanks for getting back to me, Gene.  I hope they can resolve it without too much effort.  It’s really a relatively minor inconvenience after all.
 
George
 

From: Gene New Zealand
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 3:50 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA not starting after login under windows 10
 

Hi

 

I have had the opposite.

When i upgraded to 2017.4 it unchecked the start nvda when windows does check box so i just went in and checked it so it would start again as usual.

They are aware of this bug but not tracked it down yet.
This is on a windows 10 machine running f1709

Gene nz

On 12/7/2017 10:41 AM, George McCoy wrote:
   I'm running windows 10 professional version 1709.  I have two local accounts set up; one as administrator and one as standard user.

NVDA works fine on the logon screen and starts when I log into the admin account.  When I log into the standard user account, however, NvDA does not start automatically.  automatically start NVDA after I log onto windows is checked.

Has anyone else encountered this?  Is there a solution?

Thanks very much,
George




--
Image NVDA
        certified expert
Check out my website for NVDA tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net Regardless of where you are in New Zealand if you are near one of the APNK sites you can use a copy of the NVDA screen reader on one of their computers. To find out which locations (or location) is near to you please visit http://www.aotearoapeoplesnetwork.org/content/partner-libraries (Aotearoa People's Network Kaharoa). To find an NVDA certified expert near you, please visit the following link https://certification.nvaccess.org/. The certification page contains the official list of NVDA certified individuals from around the world, who have sat and successfully passed the NVDA expert exam.


Re: Power Point presentation access

Quentin Christensen
 

Which version of Office are you using?  Certainly in recent versions, NVDA should work fine in presentation mode.  One big trick to look out for however, is when creating a slideshow, you can set bullet point "animations" where each bullet point (or other object on a slide) only appears as you press enter / right arrow etc.  This works visually, but NVDA reads the whole slide as soon as it loads.  The best workaround at this stage is ideally to not use animations for now (slide transitions are a separate thing - they control how each slide appears or replaces the last, and they are fine) or to use them consistently, press control as soon as each slide loads, and then as you press enter to load each bullet, press down arrow to have NVDA read you the line.

On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 1:37 AM, <ely.r@...> wrote:
Thanks for this. I was in touch with the Microsoft Accessibility Team. They sent suggestions along using Narrator. However, even in the overview of that process, it was stated that Narrator would not work in presentation mode.

I will give this a try,
Rick

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Domingos de Oliveira via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 6:41 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Power Point presentation access

Hi,

if you change into the presentation Mode with F5, NVDA reads the whole slide. You then have to press Return to turn to the next slide.

HTH

2017-12-06 1:34 GMT+01:00, Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>:
> Rick,
>
>
>
> I am able to read presentations including alternative text tags in
> Powerpoint with NVDA without problems. No third party program needed.
>
>
>
> Pranav
>
>


--
Domingos de Oliveira
- Online-Redakteur

Karthäuserstraße 13
53129 Bonn
Telefon: 017632245129
Web: www.oliveira-online.net
www.netz-barrierefrei.de
Mail: domingos20000@...
USt-ID: DE273231108










--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: NVDA 2017.4 released

David Moore
 

Great Work, NV Access!

NVDA 2017.4 is working very well for me in many Win10 apps, the Skype app for Win10, and working great in Edge and all other web browsers.

Thank you so very much.

I have almost totally given up other screen readers for NVDA.

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 5:17 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released

 

It's working great here too. Thank you, NV Access.

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of matthew dyer

Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:41 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released

 

Hi,

 

 

Just upgraded and so far it works well here.  Great work NVaccess!

 

 

 

 

On 12/6/2017 7:40 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:

> Its not but its not intuitive which is why I suggested somebody wrote

> a basics article on it. Its more what to ignore than what to use on

> there. Its a typical site trying to be everything to everybody but

> ending up a bit of a cluttered mess for most unless they know the

> tricks. I do not particularly like the in field helpful comments

> either. I'd prefer separate fields one can fill in for the various

> questions myself.

> Brian

> bglists@...

> Sent via blueyonder.

> Please address personal email to:-

> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

> in the display name field.

> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Damien Sykes"

> <damien@...>

> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

> Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:36 AM

> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released

> Hi Quentin,

> Unfortunately, I’m still seeing the text field related lags I

> mentioned after the release of 2017.3 (namely announcements of text

> highlighting, beginning/end of document/field messages etc). Luckily

> for me there was nothing seriously important for me to need to upgrade

> (both 2017.3 and 2017.4 seem to be concentrating on Braille and

> Windows 10, both of which are irrelevant for me at present), but I

> felt it important to mention it again in case others are still having

> these issues.

> I would post it as an issue on GitHub, except that as far as I’m

> concerned, that site seems to have made its way down from heaven on

> Mars. Forget the programming elements and integrations with Git (which

> is an aeroplane cockpit in and of itself), even posting issues seems

> to be a full day’s work for me.

> Cheers.

> Damien.

> From: Quentin Christensen

> Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:13 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released

> NV Access is pleased to announce that version 2017.4 of NVDA, the free

> screen reader for Microsoft Windows, has now been released.

> https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nv-access-announces-availability-of-nvda

> -2017-4/

> Highlights of this release include many fixes and enhancements to web

> support including browse mode for web dialogs by default, better

> reporting of field group labels in browse mode, support for new

> Windows 10 technologies such as Windows Defender Application Guard and

> Windows 10 on ARM64, and automatic reporting of screen orientation and

> battery status. Please note that this version of NVDA no longer

> supports Windows XP or Windows Vista. The minimum requirement for NVDA

> is now windows 7 with Service Pack 1.

> This award-winning software has been changing the lives of thousands

> of blind and vision impaired people who can now independently use

> computers to produce written content, read news, socialise, shop and

> bank online, and, most importantly, actively participate in education

> and employment. Please consider helping NV Access to continue this

> important work by becoming a monthly donor.  Download or update today:

> https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nv-access-announces-availability-of-nvda

> -2017-4/

> Kind regards

> Quentin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Browsing hierarchical tree of comments

Gene
 

I haven't tried this but I don't see how using the cursor location feature would help much.  You would still have to move to the beginning of each comment and check the distance.  If that would save you time in not having to read any of the comment, I don't know but having to move to the next comment and check the distance of each comment would seem to be cumbersome and perhaps not much easier than reading a bit of each comment to see if it’s a reply.  but those who try this may explain that I'm wrong and why. 
 
Perhaps what we need, if this can be done, is a feature or a plugin you can set to look for text that starts a certain distance from the left side of the screen and then be able to jump to the next text that starts at the same number of pixels from the left of the screen.  You could issue a next and a back command to move to these items.  So the idea may lead to a good solution if such a feature can be developed.
 
By the way, you don't have to issue the command twice.  It does the same thing if issued once or more times.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Browsing hierarchical tree of comments

I've been playing with NVDA and just discovered a simple solution: press
Insert + Numpad Delete twice (Report review cursor location) and it will
tell you the distance from the left edge of the screen. The greater the
distance - the deeper the level of the comment.


I think in theory something can be done on the client side to make the
comments more readable for screenreader users.. You can write a browser
plugin that would modify a page to include the level of the comment
explicitly for example. But this is only in theory: my knowledge of
javascript/HTML/CSS is too poor to write it myself.


Tony





On 12/6/2017 11:29 AM, Bill Dengler wrote:
> I’m interested in this as well, but suspect it requires changes on the site’s end.
>
> Bill
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 7:00 PM, Tony Malykh <anton.malykh@...> wrote:
>>
>> Hi everyone,
>>
>> Many websites have tree-like structure of comments. For
>> example, reddit, hacker news, and probably a lot more websites are
>> like this. Sometimes I would like to read some comments, but for
>> example I would like to read only the top-level comments, and not the
>> deeper levels, because that would be the replies to the top-level
>> comments, and they are typically not as interesting. Is there any way
>> to achieve this with NVDA?
>>
>> So, for example, I would like to have a key combination to jump to the
>> next same level comment. Right now I can only jump to the next comment
>> of any level by searching a keyword ("up vote" or something, that
>> appears next to every comment), and then I'd have to deduce in my mind
>> what level comment is this. It is very tedious to browse comments this way.
>>
>> Another way that might help me would be to figure out the level of the
>> current comment. At least I'd be able to move down through the
>> comments without reading them and without trying to deduce its level
>> from the contents.
>>
>> I can use Firefox, Google Chrome and IE, so I'd be happy to find a solution that works in any of these browsers.
>>
>> Any advice would be appreciated!
>> Tony
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Re: OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

Don H
 

Never understood that you can buy a 128 Gig thumb drive for less than 30 bucks yet a 128 Gig SSD cost several hundred bucks.


Re: OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

David Moore
 

Wow, it sure is!

If you begin to fill that, you can back stuff onto another external drive, for example.

I would give anything to have a SSD 1 TB drive. Wow, that would be wild LOL!

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Kevin Cussick via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 6:08 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

 

I have one pc with a Tb ssd drive is this big enough/

 

On 04/12/2017 11:59, Clare Page wrote:

> Hi!

>

> As someone who is not a techy and has never yet used an SSD drive, I can

> think of one drawback of those drives, namely their smaller capacity.

> It’s all very well to say that we could keep big files, such as anything

> audio, on an external drive, but, if we don’t want to keep that drive

> connected to the computer for whatever reason, we don’t have immediate

> access to those big files. That’s one reason why an SSD drive is less

> tempting for me when I get another computer, especially as, the more

> capacity you want on an SSD drive, the more expensive that will be.

>

> I would also guess that having lots of RAM could make a new computer

> more expensive; I have never had a computer with more than 4 GB of RAM,

> but that much has served me well over the past few years. It’s true that

> things are changing in the computer world, so it’s possible that newer

> programs might need more power, but I’m not convinced that we need huge

> amounts of RAM yet.

>

> As I write this, it’s hard to predict how difficult choosing my next

> computer will be, but ideally I want something with a reasonable but not

> excessive amount of RAM, and a not-too-small capacity of memory for

> storing my files so that I do not always have to use an external drive

> except for backup purposes.

>

> Bye for now!

>

>  From Clare

>

> *From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of *Gene

> *Sent:* lundi 4 décembre 2017 08:53

> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io

> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than

> before

>

> I would say that it may be beneficial in a lot of ways but I suspect

> that it has drawbacks that most perhaps almost all people never think

> about.  I really like computers, where I can issue commands and have all

> sorts of things happen.  But it's an artificially easy world and an

> artificially fast gratification environment.  I suspect that that is one

> reason we see more impatients and bad temper.  I haven't thought much

> about this.  It's common to read the common complaints about computers

> but having so great a contrast between the world and the computer world

> may have undesirable effects people generally don't think about.

>

> Gene

>

> ----- Original Message -----

>

> *From:*enes sarıbaş <mailto:enes.saribas@...>

>

> *Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 1:42 AM

>

> *To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>

> *Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than

> before

>

> still, I would argue that having a fast computer is benefitial on all

> fronts.

>

> On 12/4/2017 10:06 AM, Gene wrote:

>

>     I might argue that having slower devices might actually allow people

>     to think more about things they read.  I have a slow old computer

>     and I suspect that the amount of extra time it takes me to open

>     another article or web page after reading something on my current

>     page, may allow me to think a bit more and perhaps retain a bit more

>     because of thought.  Speed can't be assumed to always be

>     beneficial.  I have faster computers but for various reasons I won't

>     go into here, I use the slow one most of the time.  It's annoying if

>     I'm doing something taxing but I suspect I also benefit from the

>     more leisurely pace at which some things occur.  Lack of reflection

>     is one of the most common complaints social commentators have about

>     current times.

>

>     And people may be so used to the fast pace at which they do things

>     that they may not even be aware of how it is adversely affecting

>     them in various ways.

>

>     Gene

>

>     ----- Original Message -----

>

>     Gene

>

>     ----- Original Message -----

>

>     *From:*Andy <mailto:wq6r@...>

>

>     *Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 12:57 AM

>

>     *To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>

>     *Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult

>     than before

>

>     It's interesting that we have all of these time saving devices at

>     our disposal, but we always seem to complain that we don't have

>     enough time.

>

>     Andy

>

>         ----- Original Message -----

>

>         *From:*enes sarıbaş <mailto:enes.saribas@...>

>

>         *To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>

>         *Sent:*Sunday, December 03, 2017 10:49 PM

>

>         *Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more

>         difficult than before

>

>         well, lets say you opened 5000 documents a year. With a time

>         save of 3 seconds, you save about 15000 seconds a year, which is

>         alot. And believe me, it is much more than that. I have probably

>         saved hours of my life with my ssd. Some of these things, like

>         an ssd can only be experienced, not described. The benchmarks

>         only hint at the performance improvement. So my suggestion gene,

>         is for you to someday try using a system with an ssd for just 5

>         minutes, and I garantee you you will never want to go back to a

>         normal harddrive.

>

>         On 12/4/2017 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:

>

>             I should have said, let's say it takes one second using an

>             SSD drive.

>

>             Gene

>

>             ----- Original Message -----

>

>             *From:*Gene <mailto:gsasner@...>

>

>             *Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 12:23 AM

>

>             *To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>

>             *Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more

>             difficult than before

>

>             Let's say it takes four seconds to open Microsoft Word using

>             a mechanical drive.  let's say it takes one second using a

>             mechanical drive.  How have I saved any amount of time that

>             means anything?  If I open word and load a document and I

>             spend four seconds to open the program and four seconds in

>             actual loading time after I find the document and press

>             enter in the open dialog, then I spend twenty minutes

>             working with the document or even ten minutes, how is eight

>             seconds a meaningful amount of time?  I can leave one or two

>             programs opened, if I wish, if I use them a lot.

>

>             Gene

>

>             ----- Original Message -----

>

>             *From:*Lenron <mailto:lenron93@...>

>

>             *Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 12:05 AM

>

>             *To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>

>             *Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more

>             difficult than before

>

>             Agreed even when doing simple things an ssd is faster. This

>             is just facts.

>

>             On 12/3/17, enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...

>             <mailto:enes.saribas@...>> wrote:

>              > hi,

>              >

>              > I respectfully disagree. The speed difference from an ssd

>             is so massive

>              > that, even with very simplistic daily tasks, getting an

>             ssd can be a

>              > massive time saver. I agree that anyone who can aford it

>             should get an ssd.

>              >

>              >

>              > On 12/3/2017 5:48 PM, Gene wrote:

>              >> At some point, perhaps as early as Windows 7, Windows

>             won't even let

>              >> you defragment SSD drives, as I recall.

>              >> On another subject related to SSD drives, I consider

>             sweeping

>              >> statements such as, these days, everyone should have SSD

>             drives to be

>              >> far too prescriptive and overgeneral.  If you do things

>             where speed

>              >> matters, copying lots of large files, converting lots of

>             large files,

>              >> doing a lot of recording of long works and exporting the

>             recording to

>              >> a compressed format such as MP3, and other uses I

>             haven't though of

>              >> while at the moment, then it would make sense.  but if

>             you mainly do

>              >> things like word processing, web browsing, and other

>             typical uses, I

>              >> don't consider it important.  there are some people who

>             just want

>              >> everything to be very fast, they don't want programs to

>             take one or

>              >> two seconds to open, they want a program to open almost

>             instantly.  If

>              >> they want to spend the money for emotional satisfaction and

>              >> indulgence, fine, but not everyone wants or needs

>             hotrods, whetgher in

>              >> computers, cars, or anywhere else.

>              >> There may be another time when having an SSD drive might

>             be important,

>              >> others may wish to comment.  If you have a laptop, and

>             are going to

>              >> use it under conditions where it will be jostled and

>             jolted somewhat

>              >> severely or severely while in use, such as driving over

>             rather rough

>              >> or very rough roads, then I would think an SSD would be

>             a good idea

>              >> or  important.

>              >> Gene

>              >> ----- Original Message -----

>              >> *From:* Antony Stone

>             <mailto:antony.stone@...>

>              >> *Sent:* Sunday, December 03, 2017 4:42 AM

>              >> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>             <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>              >> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more

>             difficult

>              >> than before

>              >>

>              >> I would be very interested if you could post some links

>             to the

>              >> information

>              >> about SSDs becoming unwriteable.

>              >>

>              >> Regarding defragmenting an SSD - there is absolutely no

>             point.

>              >>

>              >> The whole purpose of defragmenting a traditional

>             spinning hard disk

>              >> was to get

>              >> all the parts of a single file together, instead of

>             being spread

>              >> (fragmented)

>              >> across the drive, which happens when small files are

>             deleted and then

>              >> larger

>              >> ones are written into the gaps afterwards.  Having the

>             entire file

>              >> together in

>              >> one place is much more efficient for reading it later

>             than having it

>              >> spread

>              >> around the disk (because it takes time for the

>             mechanical heads to go

>              >> and find

>              >> all the different parts).

>              >>

>              >> With an SSD, accessing one part is just as efficient as

>             any other -

>              >> nothing

>              >> needs to move to get to the next part, so fragmented

>             files are no less

>              >> efficient

>              >> to read than complete ones.

>              >>

>              >>

>              >> Antony.

>              >>

>              >> On Sunday 03 December 2017 at 11:35:19, The Gamages wrote:

>              >>

>              >> > Hello,

>              >> > Regarding SSDs, as I understand it, there is a slight

>             issue with

>              >> these in

>              >> > that some memory can become un writable, it can still

>             be read, but

>              >> nothing

>              >> > further can be writtten into it.

>              >> > I realise that this can take a long time to happen

>             and, if the drive

>              >> is a

>              >> > large capacity, it may never be an issue.

>              >> > I am only raising this point because I don’t fully

>             understand the

>              >> > consequences of this.

>              >> > I was told by a computer engineer that it is not a

>             good idea to de

>              >> fragment

>              >> > a solid state drive for this reason, it can make some

>             memory un

>              >> writable if

>              >> > it is done regularly and is not really necessary  on

>             this sort of

>              >> > drive.

>              >> >

>              >> > Comments please, even if you shoot me down in

>             flames,[smile]..

>              >> >

>              >> > Best Regards, Jim.

>              >> >

>              >> > From: Tyler Wood

>              >> > Sent: Friday, December 01, 2017 6:43 PM

>              >> > To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>             <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>              >> > Subject: Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more

>             difficult than

>              >> > before

>              >> >

>              >> > Keep in mind AMD has just released their ryzen mobile

>             processors, so

>              >> that

>              >> > should be interesting. Similar to Intel, it will be

>             Ryzen 3 = intel i3,

>              >> > ryzen 5 = intel i5, ryzen 7 = intel i7.

>              >> >

>              >> > In these modern days, hard drives truly limit the

>             speed of a

>              >> computer. If

>              >> > you can afford it, even if it takes a little longer to

>             save up, go for

>              >> > something with a solid state drive. You’ll never go

>             back again. Even a

>              >> > cheap windows tablet with a 64 gb ssd is going to beat

>             the socks off of

>              >> > that huge i5 with a 1 tb spinning hard drives in

>             booting up, general

>              >> > snappyness around windows. Web browsing not so much

>             but even so the

>              >> solid

>              >> > state drive is what makes or breaks a computer and is

>             why you can get

>              >> > by

>              >> > with a core i3 or equal from AMD.

>              >> >

>              >> > Sean has a good point about soundcards these days,

>             too. And even with

>              >> > headphones on it can still be painful with speech – so

>             try and play

>              >> > with

>              >> > them in the store using narrator.

>              >>

>              >> --

>              >> "In fact I wanted to be John Cleese and it took me some

>             time to

>              >> realise that

>              >> the job was already taken."

>              >>

>              >>  - Douglas Adams

>              >>

>              >>                                                  

>             Please reply to the

>              >> list;

>              >>                                                        

>             please

>              >> *don't* CC me.

>              >>

>              >>

>              >>

>              >>

>              >

>              >

>

>

>             --

>             Lenron Brown

>             Cell: 985-271-2832

>             Skype: ron.brown762

>

>

>

 

 

 


Re: OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

David Moore
 

Hi!

With my SSD computer with no fan, If I have no speech, and I think it should be running, I do the following.
I press CTRL+Windows+enter to see if Narrator comes on.

If it does not, than I check to see if my computer is muted by pressing the correct function key. If I still get no speech, then I press Windows + D that puts you on the desktop. Then, I press Alt+F4 to bring up the power menu. I arrow to the last choice, which is restart. I press enter and wait just a minute. If still no action, then I hold down the power button for a few seconds, which is a very last resort. Then, I just tap the power button to turn the computer back on.

In two years, I have only had to do all of that twice.

Usually, one screen reader will freeze up, and you can turn on Narrator. When you do that, the other screen reader will start working. Narrator is such a big help, because it will start with CTRL+Windows+Enter when other screen readers like NVDA or JAWS will not start for some reason.

You just have to go by your screen reader if it responds or not, most of the time, to see if it is running or not. I love the SSD drive. I get so impatient when I go back to my laptop using a regular Hard drive, because it is so slow compared to having the SSD drive!

Take care, guys!

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Sarah k Alawami
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

 

No. You do'thear it but if you detect anythig odd you just now it might be the drive. You can also do a scan o the disk as well. My ssd has ben going for 3 years on my mac and it's still pretty good. A bit slower but still pretty good.

 

> On Dec 5, 2017, at 1:59 PM, tina sohl <tinabir@...> wrote:

>

> How do you know when a pc with and ssd drive is running? If you can't see it, is there still something you can hear? Both our pcs still have regular drives so we're curious.

> Original message:

>> Once you go SSD you don't want to ever go back. You can if needed but

>> you really don't want to techy or no techy. I might hate the size of

>> the SSD on my Mac book pro but I love   that it has one. My windows

>> 10 custom built Machine flies because of this SSD and the fact it does

>> have a pretty nice processor.

>

>> On 12/4/17, enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...> wrote:

>>> well, lets say you opened 5000 documents a year. With a time save of 3

>>> seconds, you save about 15000 seconds a year, which is alot. And believe

>>> me, it is much more than that. I have probably saved hours of my life

>>> with my ssd. Some of these things, like an ssd can only be experienced,

>>> not described. The benchmarks only hint at the performance improvement.

>>> So my suggestion gene, is for you to someday try using a system with an

>>> ssd for just 5 minutes, and I garantee you you will never want to go

>>> back to a normal harddrive.

>

>

>>> On 12/4/2017 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:

>>>> I should have said, let's say it takes one second using an SSD drive.

>>>> Gene

>>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>>> *From:* Gene <mailto:gsasner@...>

>>>> *Sent:* Monday, December 04, 2017 12:23 AM

>>>> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>>> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult

>>>> than before

>

>>>> Let's say it takes four seconds to open Microsoft Word using a

>>>> mechanical drive.  let's say it takes one second using a mechanical

>>>> drive.  How have I saved any amount of time that means anything?  If I

>>>> open word and load a document and I spend four seconds to open the

>>>> program and four seconds in actual loading time after I find the

>>>> document and press enter in the open dialog, then I spend twenty

>>>> minutes working with the document or even ten minutes, how is eight

>>>> seconds a meaningful amount of time?  I can leave one or two programs

>>>> opened, if I wish, if I use them a lot.

>>>> Gene

>>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>>> *From:* Lenron <mailto:lenron93@...>

>>>> *Sent:* Monday, December 04, 2017 12:05 AM

>>>> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>>> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult

>>>> than before

>

>>>> Agreed even when doing simple things an ssd is faster. This is just

>>>> facts.

>

>>>> On 12/3/17, enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...

>>>> <mailto:enes.saribas@...>> wrote:

>>>>> hi,

>

>>>>> I respectfully disagree. The speed difference from an ssd is so massive

>>>>> that, even with very simplistic daily tasks, getting an ssd can be a

>>>>> massive time saver. I agree that anyone who can aford it should get

>>>> an ssd.

>

>

>>>>> On 12/3/2017 5:48 PM, Gene wrote:

>>>>>> At some point, perhaps as early as Windows 7, Windows won't even let

>>>>>> you defragment SSD drives, as I recall.

>>>>>> On another subject related to SSD drives, I consider sweeping

>>>>>> statements such as, these days, everyone should have SSD drives to be

>>>>>> far too prescriptive and overgeneral.  If you do things where speed

>>>>>> matters, copying lots of large files, converting lots of large files,

>>>>>> doing a lot of recording of long works and exporting the recording to

>>>>>> a compressed format such as MP3, and other uses I haven't though of

>>>>>> while at the moment, then it would make sense.  but if you mainly do

>>>>>> things like word processing, web browsing, and other typical uses, I

>>>>>> don't consider it important.  there are some people who just want

>>>>>> everything to be very fast, they don't want programs to take one or

>>>>>> two seconds to open, they want a program to open almost instantly.  If

>>>>>> they want to spend the money for emotional satisfaction and

>>>>>> indulgence, fine, but not everyone wants or needs hotrods, whetgher in

>>>>>> computers, cars, or anywhere else.

>>>>>> There may be another time when having an SSD drive might be important,

>>>>>> others may wish to comment.  If you have a laptop, and are going to

>>>>>> use it under conditions where it will be jostled and jolted somewhat

>>>>>> severely or severely while in use, such as driving over rather rough

>>>>>> or very rough roads, then I would think an SSD would be a good idea

>>>>>> or  important.

>>>>>> Gene

>>>>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>>>>> *From:* Antony Stone <mailto:antony.stone@...>

>>>>>> *Sent:* Sunday, December 03, 2017 4:42 AM

>>>>>> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>>> <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>>>>> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult

>>>>>> than before

>

>>>>>> I would be very interested if you could post some links to the

>>>>>> information

>>>>>> about SSDs becoming unwriteable.

>

>>>>>> Regarding defragmenting an SSD - there is absolutely no point.

>

>>>>>> The whole purpose of defragmenting a traditional spinning hard disk

>>>>>> was to get

>>>>>> all the parts of a single file together, instead of being spread

>>>>>> (fragmented)

>>>>>> across the drive, which happens when small files are deleted and then

>>>>>> larger

>>>>>> ones are written into the gaps afterwards.  Having the entire file

>>>>>> together in

>>>>>> one place is much more efficient for reading it later than having it

>>>>>> spread

>>>>>> around the disk (because it takes time for the mechanical heads to go

>>>>>> and find

>>>>>> all the different parts).

>

>>>>>> With an SSD, accessing one part is just as efficient as any other -

>>>>>> nothing

>>>>>> needs to move to get to the next part, so fragmented files are no less

>>>>>> efficient

>>>>>> to read than complete ones.

>

>

>>>>>> Antony.

>

>>>>>> On Sunday 03 December 2017 at 11:35:19, The Gamages wrote:

>

>>>>>>> Hello,

>>>>>>> Regarding SSDs, as I understand it, there is a slight issue with

>>>>>> these in

>>>>>>> that some memory can become un writable, it can still be read, but

>>>>>> nothing

>>>>>>> further can be writtten into it.

>>>>>>> I realise that this can take a long time to happen and, if the drive

>>>>>> is a

>>>>>>> large capacity, it may never be an issue.

>>>>>>> I am only raising this point because I don’t fully understand the

>>>>>>> consequences of this.

>>>>>>> I was told by a computer engineer that it is not a good idea to de

>>>>>> fragment

>>>>>>> a solid state drive for this reason, it can make some memory un

>>>>>> writable if

>>>>>>> it is done regularly and is not really necessary  on this sort of

>>>>>>> drive.

>

>>>>>>> Comments please, even if you shoot me down in flames,[smile]..

>

>>>>>>> Best Regards, Jim.

>

>>>>>>> From: Tyler Wood

>>>>>>> Sent: Friday, December 01, 2017 6:43 PM

>>>>>>> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>>> <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>>>>>> Subject: Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult

>>>>>>> than

>>>>>>> before

>

>>>>>>> Keep in mind AMD has just released their ryzen mobile processors, so

>>>>>> that

>>>>>>> should be interesting. Similar to Intel, it will be Ryzen 3 =

>>>> intel i3,

>>>>>>> ryzen 5 = intel i5, ryzen 7 = intel i7.

>

>>>>>>> In these modern days, hard drives truly limit the speed of a

>>>>>> computer. If

>>>>>>> you can afford it, even if it takes a little longer to save up,

>>>> go for

>>>>>>> something with a solid state drive. You’ll never go back again.

>>>> Even a

>>>>>>> cheap windows tablet with a 64 gb ssd is going to beat the socks

>>>> off of

>>>>>>> that huge i5 with a 1 tb spinning hard drives in booting up, general

>>>>>>> snappyness around windows. Web browsing not so much but even so the

>>>>>> solid

>>>>>>> state drive is what makes or breaks a computer and is why you can

>>>>>>> get

>>>>>>> by

>>>>>>> with a core i3 or equal from AMD.

>

>>>>>>> Sean has a good point about soundcards these days, too. And even

>>>>>>> with

>>>>>>> headphones on it can still be painful with speech – so try and play

>>>>>>> with

>>>>>>> them in the store using narrator.

>

>>>>>> --

>>>>>> "In fact I wanted to be John Cleese and it took me some time to

>>>>>> realise that

>>>>>> the job was already taken."

>

>>>>>>  - Douglas Adams

>

>>>>>>                                                    Please reply to the

>>>>>> list;

>>>>>> please

>>>>>> *don't* CC me.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>>>> --

>>>> Lenron Brown

>>>> Cell: 985-271-2832

>>>> Skype: ron.brown762

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>> --

>> Lenron Brown

>> Cell: 985-271-2832

>> Skype: ron.brown762

>

>

>

>

 

 

 

 


Re: OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before

Kevin Cussick
 

I have one pc with a Tb ssd drive is this big enough/

On 04/12/2017 11:59, Clare Page wrote:
Hi!
As someone who is not a techy and has never yet used an SSD drive, I can think of one drawback of those drives, namely their smaller capacity. It’s all very well to say that we could keep big files, such as anything audio, on an external drive, but, if we don’t want to keep that drive connected to the computer for whatever reason, we don’t have immediate access to those big files. That’s one reason why an SSD drive is less tempting for me when I get another computer, especially as, the more capacity you want on an SSD drive, the more expensive that will be.
I would also guess that having lots of RAM could make a new computer more expensive; I have never had a computer with more than 4 GB of RAM, but that much has served me well over the past few years. It’s true that things are changing in the computer world, so it’s possible that newer programs might need more power, but I’m not convinced that we need huge amounts of RAM yet.
As I write this, it’s hard to predict how difficult choosing my next computer will be, but ideally I want something with a reasonable but not excessive amount of RAM, and a not-too-small capacity of memory for storing my files so that I do not always have to use an external drive except for backup purposes.
Bye for now!
From Clare
*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of *Gene
*Sent:* lundi 4 décembre 2017 08:53
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before
I would say that it may be beneficial in a lot of ways but I suspect that it has drawbacks that most perhaps almost all people never think about.  I really like computers, where I can issue commands and have all sorts of things happen.  But it's an artificially easy world and an artificially fast gratification environment.  I suspect that that is one reason we see more impatients and bad temper.  I haven't thought much about this.  It's common to read the common complaints about computers but having so great a contrast between the world and the computer world may have undesirable effects people generally don't think about.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:*enes sarıbaş <mailto:enes.saribas@gmail.com>
*Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 1:42 AM
*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult than before
still, I would argue that having a fast computer is benefitial on all fronts.
On 12/4/2017 10:06 AM, Gene wrote:
I might argue that having slower devices might actually allow people
to think more about things they read.  I have a slow old computer
and I suspect that the amount of extra time it takes me to open
another article or web page after reading something on my current
page, may allow me to think a bit more and perhaps retain a bit more
because of thought.  Speed can't be assumed to always be
beneficial.  I have faster computers but for various reasons I won't
go into here, I use the slow one most of the time.  It's annoying if
I'm doing something taxing but I suspect I also benefit from the
more leisurely pace at which some things occur.  Lack of reflection
is one of the most common complaints social commentators have about
current times.
And people may be so used to the fast pace at which they do things
that they may not even be aware of how it is adversely affecting
them in various ways.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:*Andy <mailto:wq6r@socal.rr.com>
*Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 12:57 AM
*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more difficult
than before
It's interesting that we have all of these time saving devices at
our disposal, but we always seem to complain that we don't have
enough time.
Andy
----- Original Message -----
*From:*enes sarıbaş <mailto:enes.saribas@gmail.com>
*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Sent:*Sunday, December 03, 2017 10:49 PM
*Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more
difficult than before
well, lets say you opened 5000 documents a year. With a time
save of 3 seconds, you save about 15000 seconds a year, which is
alot. And believe me, it is much more than that. I have probably
saved hours of my life with my ssd. Some of these things, like
an ssd can only be experienced, not described. The benchmarks
only hint at the performance improvement. So my suggestion gene,
is for you to someday try using a system with an ssd for just 5
minutes, and I garantee you you will never want to go back to a
normal harddrive.
On 12/4/2017 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
I should have said, let's say it takes one second using an
SSD drive.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:*Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
*Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 12:23 AM
*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more
difficult than before
Let's say it takes four seconds to open Microsoft Word using
a mechanical drive.  let's say it takes one second using a
mechanical drive.  How have I saved any amount of time that
means anything?  If I open word and load a document and I
spend four seconds to open the program and four seconds in
actual loading time after I find the document and press
enter in the open dialog, then I spend twenty minutes
working with the document or even ten minutes, how is eight
seconds a meaningful amount of time?  I can leave one or two
programs opened, if I wish, if I use them a lot.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:*Lenron <mailto:lenron93@gmail.com>
*Sent:*Monday, December 04, 2017 12:05 AM
*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:*Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more
difficult than before
Agreed even when doing simple things an ssd is faster. This
is just facts.
On 12/3/17, enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@gmail.com
<mailto:enes.saribas@gmail.com>> wrote:
> hi,
>
> I respectfully disagree. The speed difference from an ssd
is so massive
> that, even with very simplistic daily tasks, getting an
ssd can be a
> massive time saver. I agree that anyone who can aford it
should get an ssd.
>
>
> On 12/3/2017 5:48 PM, Gene wrote:
>> At some point, perhaps as early as Windows 7, Windows
won't even let
>> you defragment SSD drives, as I recall.
>> On another subject related to SSD drives, I consider
sweeping
>> statements such as, these days, everyone should have SSD
drives to be
>> far too prescriptive and overgeneral.  If you do things
where speed
>> matters, copying lots of large files, converting lots of
large files,
>> doing a lot of recording of long works and exporting the
recording to
>> a compressed format such as MP3, and other uses I
haven't though of
>> while at the moment, then it would make sense.  but if
you mainly do
>> things like word processing, web browsing, and other
typical uses, I
>> don't consider it important.  there are some people who
just want
>> everything to be very fast, they don't want programs to
take one or
>> two seconds to open, they want a program to open almost
instantly.  If
>> they want to spend the money for emotional satisfaction and
>> indulgence, fine, but not everyone wants or needs
hotrods, whetgher in
>> computers, cars, or anywhere else.
>> There may be another time when having an SSD drive might
be important,
>> others may wish to comment.  If you have a laptop, and
are going to
>> use it under conditions where it will be jostled and
jolted somewhat
>> severely or severely while in use, such as driving over
rather rough
>> or very rough roads, then I would think an SSD would be
a good idea
>> or  important.
>> Gene
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> *From:* Antony Stone
<mailto:antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, December 03, 2017 4:42 AM
>> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more
difficult
>> than before
>>
>> I would be very interested if you could post some links
to the
>> information
>> about SSDs becoming unwriteable.
>>
>> Regarding defragmenting an SSD - there is absolutely no
point.
>>
>> The whole purpose of defragmenting a traditional
spinning hard disk
>> was to get
>> all the parts of a single file together, instead of
being spread
>> (fragmented)
>> across the drive, which happens when small files are
deleted and then
>> larger
>> ones are written into the gaps afterwards.  Having the
entire file
>> together in
>> one place is much more efficient for reading it later
than having it
>> spread
>> around the disk (because it takes time for the
mechanical heads to go
>> and find
>> all the different parts).
>>
>> With an SSD, accessing one part is just as efficient as
any other -
>> nothing
>> needs to move to get to the next part, so fragmented
files are no less
>> efficient
>> to read than complete ones.
>>
>>
>> Antony.
>>
>> On Sunday 03 December 2017 at 11:35:19, The Gamages wrote:
>>
>> > Hello,
>> > Regarding SSDs, as I understand it, there is a slight
issue with
>> these in
>> > that some memory can become un writable, it can still
be read, but
>> nothing
>> > further can be writtten into it.
>> > I realise that this can take a long time to happen
and, if the drive
>> is a
>> > large capacity, it may never be an issue.
>> > I am only raising this point because I don’t fully
understand the
>> > consequences of this.
>> > I was told by a computer engineer that it is not a
good idea to de
>> fragment
>> > a solid state drive for this reason, it can make some
memory un
>> writable if
>> > it is done regularly and is not really necessary  on
this sort of
>> > drive.
>> >
>> > Comments please, even if you shoot me down in
flames,[smile]..
>> >
>> > Best Regards, Jim.
>> >
>> > From: Tyler Wood
>> > Sent: Friday, December 01, 2017 6:43 PM
>> > To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>> > Subject: Re: [nvda] OT: selecting a new laptop is more
difficult than
>> > before
>> >
>> > Keep in mind AMD has just released their ryzen mobile
processors, so
>> that
>> > should be interesting. Similar to Intel, it will be
Ryzen 3 = intel i3,
>> > ryzen 5 = intel i5, ryzen 7 = intel i7.
>> >
>> > In these modern days, hard drives truly limit the
speed of a
>> computer. If
>> > you can afford it, even if it takes a little longer to
save up, go for
>> > something with a solid state drive. You’ll never go
back again. Even a
>> > cheap windows tablet with a 64 gb ssd is going to beat
the socks off of
>> > that huge i5 with a 1 tb spinning hard drives in
booting up, general
>> > snappyness around windows. Web browsing not so much
but even so the
>> solid
>> > state drive is what makes or breaks a computer and is
why you can get
>> > by
>> > with a core i3 or equal from AMD.
>> >
>> > Sean has a good point about soundcards these days,
too. And even with
>> > headphones on it can still be painful with speech – so
try and play
>> > with
>> > them in the store using narrator.
>>
>> --
>> "In fact I wanted to be John Cleese and it took me some
time to
>> realise that
>> the job was already taken."
>>
>>  - Douglas Adams
>>
>>
Please reply to the
>> list;
>>
please
>> *don't* CC me.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762


Re: Versioned Voice Dictionaries

Sharni-Lee Ward
 

Okay, opened my portable copy of 2017.3 and copied the replacements from
there. Things are mostly back on track, although the Japanese word the
ProTalker synth pronounces wrong in the hiragana couldn't be copy/pasted
into Jarte. It just came up as a line of question marks. But that's not
vitally important to me right now so I'll let that slide for the time being.


On a sort-of related note, though, Why was the pronunciation of the
phrase "for the" and the word "percent" changed in espeakNG? They sound
weird now...

On 7/12/2017 9:45 AM, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:
So I just updated to the latest NVDA, and I now have some issues thanks
to the changes with the voice dictionaries. I understand why since
languages in espeak have changed names, but I lost several voice
specific entries and don't remember what I did for them. I tried to fix
one instance and although the pronunciation sounded right in the
dictionary file, it didn't when I read the name in question somewhere
else, although it was apparent some change had been made. This behaviour
has never happened before, and the pronunciation of the replacement has
been consistent in all places. I'm concerned that I might never get this
name pronounced the way I want it again, and I've only tested this with
one entry!




Versioned Voice Dictionaries

Sharni-Lee Ward
 

So I just updated to the latest NVDA, and I now have some issues thanks
to the changes with the voice dictionaries. I understand why since
languages in espeak have changed names, but I lost several voice
specific entries and don't remember what I did for them. I tried to fix
one instance and although the pronunciation sounded right in the
dictionary file, it didn't when I read the name in question somewhere
else, although it was apparent some change had been made. This behaviour
has never happened before, and the pronunciation of the replacement has
been consistent in all places. I'm concerned that I might never get this
name pronounced the way I want it again, and I've only tested this with
one entry!


Changing pronunciation

Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

Hi,

 

Many Irish names are mispronounced by speech synthesisers. I am using Eloquence with NVDA 2017.4, Windows 10   and a name such as Senan should be pronounced sennan. Or Micheál should be pronounced mee-hawl. I placed this in the default dictionary   of NVDA and pressed OK to confirm it but the pronunciation remains the same and is incorrect! I then entered it into the Voice dictionary thinking that might do the trick. Again, it failed to make any change! Finally, I added the rule to the temporary dictionary and Bingo! It worked!

 

Can anyone tell me why the Default and Voice dictionaries do not work? Is there any setting that I should look at?

 

All the best,

 

Cearbhall

 

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...

 

 


Re: preview pane in t-bird

matthew dyer
 

Hi,


Try f8 that should hide or show the preview pain like you want.


Matthew

On 12/6/2017 12:28 PM, Mary Otten wrote:
Hi all,


Having installed the mozilla add-on, thanks to Gene's direct link, I have been trying to find a setting for the preview pane in T-bird and I'm coming up empty. I've been going through the menus systematically, but I know they can change depending on where you are in the program when you start this process. I've been in the message list and am not seeing anything about envoking a preview pane; I thought I'd see it in the view menu.


Mary



.


Re: A Question about Obtaining NVDA:

Roger Stewart
 

And you can get an external USB sound device for about $15 or$20 that will do the job of speaking and system sounds just fine. You'll need either headphones or a set of computer powered speakers.

Roger

On 12/6/2017 3:06 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
Most computers should have soundcards unless they are really old.

If in doubt atguys.com has a 15 dollar barebones one and you will need some headphones for it but still.




On 7/12/2017 8:35 a.m., Lawrence Stoler wrote:
Dear NVDA Users Group,


I am one of the many blind people who are unemployed.


There is a place I might be working for on a temporary basis as the
agency here in Connecticut wants to do a work assessment on me since I
have been out of work for a long time.


I have been an Internet user for over 14 years. I have used and enjoyed
NVDA since 2014 when I first became aware of it.


In addition to being able to download the latest version of NVDA, do I
need a sound card as it will be on a computer that has never been used
by a blind person or can I just download it from the website and go from
there?


Lawrence Stoler

?








.


Re: Browsing hierarchical tree of comments

Tony Malykh
 

I've been playing with NVDA and just discovered a simple solution: press Insert + Numpad Delete twice (Report review cursor location) and it will tell you the distance from the left edge of the screen. The greater the distance - the deeper the level of the comment.


I think in theory something can be done on the client side to make the comments more readable for screenreader users.. You can write a browser plugin that would modify a page to include the level of the comment explicitly for example. But this is only in theory: my knowledge of javascript/HTML/CSS is too poor to write it myself.


Tony

On 12/6/2017 11:29 AM, Bill Dengler wrote:
I’m interested in this as well, but suspect it requires changes on the site’s end.

Bill

On Dec 6, 2017, at 7:00 PM, Tony Malykh <anton.malykh@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi everyone,

Many websites have tree-like structure of comments. For
example, reddit, hacker news, and probably a lot more websites are
like this. Sometimes I would like to read some comments, but for
example I would like to read only the top-level comments, and not the
deeper levels, because that would be the replies to the top-level
comments, and they are typically not as interesting. Is there any way
to achieve this with NVDA?

So, for example, I would like to have a key combination to jump to the
next same level comment. Right now I can only jump to the next comment
of any level by searching a keyword ("up vote" or something, that
appears next to every comment), and then I'd have to deduce in my mind
what level comment is this. It is very tedious to browse comments this way.

Another way that might help me would be to figure out the level of the
current comment. At least I'd be able to move down through the
comments without reading them and without trying to deduce its level
from the contents.

I can use Firefox, Google Chrome and IE, so I'd be happy to find a solution that works in any of these browsers.

Any advice would be appreciated!
Tony




Re: NVDA 2017.4 released

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

It's working great here too. Thank you, NV Access.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of matthew dyer
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released

Hi,


Just upgraded and so far it works well here. Great work NVaccess!




On 12/6/2017 7:40 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Its not but its not intuitive which is why I suggested somebody wrote
a basics article on it. Its more what to ignore than what to use on
there. Its a typical site trying to be everything to everybody but
ending up a bit of a cluttered mess for most unless they know the
tricks. I do not particularly like the in field helpful comments
either. I'd prefer separate fields one can fill in for the various
questions myself.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Damien Sykes"
<damien@dcpendleton.plus.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released


Hi Quentin,
Unfortunately, I’m still seeing the text field related lags I
mentioned after the release of 2017.3 (namely announcements of text
highlighting, beginning/end of document/field messages etc). Luckily
for me there was nothing seriously important for me to need to upgrade
(both 2017.3 and 2017.4 seem to be concentrating on Braille and
Windows 10, both of which are irrelevant for me at present), but I
felt it important to mention it again in case others are still having
these issues.
I would post it as an issue on GitHub, except that as far as I’m
concerned, that site seems to have made its way down from heaven on
Mars. Forget the programming elements and integrations with Git (which
is an aeroplane cockpit in and of itself), even posting issues seems
to be a full day’s work for me.
Cheers.
Damien.


From: Quentin Christensen
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:13 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released

NV Access is pleased to announce that version 2017.4 of NVDA, the free
screen reader for Microsoft Windows, has now been released.



https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nv-access-announces-availability-of-nvda
-2017-4/





Highlights of this release include many fixes and enhancements to web
support including browse mode for web dialogs by default, better
reporting of field group labels in browse mode, support for new
Windows 10 technologies such as Windows Defender Application Guard and
Windows 10 on ARM64, and automatic reporting of screen orientation and
battery status. Please note that this version of NVDA no longer
supports Windows XP or Windows Vista. The minimum requirement for NVDA
is now windows 7 with Service Pack 1.




This award-winning software has been changing the lives of thousands
of blind and vision impaired people who can now independently use
computers to produce written content, read news, socialise, shop and
bank online, and, most importantly, actively participate in education
and employment. Please consider helping NV Access to continue this
important work by becoming a monthly donor. Download or update today:



https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nv-access-announces-availability-of-nvda
-2017-4/




Kind regards

Quentin.


Re: Be careful to Mandarin Espeak

Marco Oros
 

OK, bug is discovered, I think It is misstake of Espeak NG.
There are two voices classified, as Mandarin Chinese. One is incorrect and countains bugs. Two voices labelled, as Mandarin Chinese in direction with chinese voices.


Re: NVDA not starting after login under windows 10

Gene New Zealand <hurrikennyandopo@...>
 

Hi


I have had the opposite.

When i upgraded to 2017.4 it unchecked the start nvda when windows does check box so i just went in and checked it so it would start again as usual.

They are aware of this bug but not tracked it down yet.
This is on a windows 10 machine running f1709

Gene nz

On 12/7/2017 10:41 AM, George McCoy wrote:
   I'm running windows 10 professional version 1709.  I have two local accounts set up; one as administrator and one as standard user.

NVDA works fine on the logon screen and starts when I log into the admin account.  When I log into the standard user account, however, NvDA does not start automatically.  automatically start NVDA after I log onto windows is checked.

Has anyone else encountered this?  Is there a solution?

Thanks very much,
George




--
Check out my website for NVDA tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net Regardless of where you are in New Zealand if you are near one of the APNK sites you can use a copy of the NVDA screen reader on one of their computers. To find out which locations (or location) is near to you please visit http://www.aotearoapeoplesnetwork.org/content/partner-libraries (Aotearoa People's Network Kaharoa). To find an NVDA certified expert near you, please visit the following link https://certification.nvaccess.org/. The certification page contains the official list of NVDA certified individuals from around the world, who have sat and successfully passed the NVDA expert exam.


Re: Be careful to Mandarin Espeak

Marco Oros
 

There were made some bad misstakes about Mandarin Espeak. I don't know, why, but I think, that some work of Espeak is at the begining.
It'll be maybe good to try create another speech synthesizer, because Espeak will soon be down. This is just my view on It.


Re: NVDA 2017.4 released

matthew dyer
 

Hi,


Just upgraded and so far it works well here.  Great work NVaccess!

On 12/6/2017 7:40 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Its not but its not intuitive which is why I suggested somebody wrote a basics article on it. Its more what to ignore than what to use on there. Its a typical site trying to be everything to everybody but ending up a bit of a cluttered mess for most unless they know the tricks. I do not particularly like the in field helpful comments either. I'd prefer separate fields one can fill in for the various questions myself.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Damien Sykes" <damien@dcpendleton.plus.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released


Hi Quentin,
Unfortunately, I’m still seeing the text field related lags I mentioned after the release of 2017.3 (namely announcements of text highlighting, beginning/end of document/field messages etc). Luckily for me there was nothing seriously important for me to need to upgrade (both 2017.3 and 2017.4 seem to be concentrating on Braille and Windows 10, both of which are irrelevant for me at present), but I felt it important to mention it again in case others are still having these issues.
I would post it as an issue on GitHub, except that as far as I’m concerned, that site seems to have made its way down from heaven on Mars. Forget the programming elements and integrations with Git (which is an aeroplane cockpit in and of itself), even posting issues seems to be a full day’s work for me.
Cheers.
Damien.


From: Quentin Christensen
Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2017 4:13 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA 2017.4 released

NV Access is pleased to announce that version 2017.4 of NVDA, the free screen reader for Microsoft Windows, has now been released.



https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nv-access-announces-availability-of-nvda-2017-4/




Highlights of this release include many fixes and enhancements to web support including browse mode for web dialogs by default, better reporting of field group labels in browse mode, support for new Windows 10 technologies such as Windows Defender Application Guard and Windows 10 on ARM64, and automatic reporting of screen orientation and battery status. Please note that this version of NVDA no longer supports Windows XP or Windows Vista. The minimum requirement for NVDA is now windows 7 with Service Pack 1.




This award-winning software has been changing the lives of thousands of blind and vision impaired people who can now independently use computers to produce written content, read news, socialise, shop and bank online, and, most importantly, actively participate in education and employment. Please consider helping NV Access to continue this important work by becoming a monthly donor.  Download or update today:



https://www.nvaccess.org/post/nv-access-announces-availability-of-nvda-2017-4/



Kind regards

Quentin.