Date   

Re: What will be with Espeak NG?

Angela Delicata
 

This is very great news!!!

Thank you so much for your priceless work.


Angela  from Italy

On 5/23/18, Quentin Christensen <quentin@nvaccess.org> wrote:
Hi Marco,

Actually we don't develop eSpeak to begin with. We use eSpeak NG which has
a GitHub repository and is open source, just like NVDA:
https://github.com/espeak-ng/espeak-ng

We are still including eSpeak NG with NVDA. We are just changing the
default synthesizer when you install it on Windows 10, to the Windows
OneCore voices. From talking with users, and importantly, with people who
don't use NVDA (and why), we found that a lot of people "Like NVDA, but the
voice is very robotic". As much as we would encourage people to explore
the settings and find a setup that works for them, the truth is, people,
particularly when testing something new, will first try the default setup,
and if something is too jarring (as eSpeak NG is for some users), they may
stop using it and not come back, even though if they were using Windows 10,
there are more human sounding voices available on their system.

So, for NVDA 2018.2, we are making Windows OneCore voice the default on
Windows 10, but we will still bundle eSpeak with NVDA, and we know many
advanced users will switch back to it, and that is fine. Note if you
already have NVDA installed and upgrade to NVDA 2018.2, it won't change
what you have setup.

I hope that answers your question, but if you have any more questions,
please don't hesitate to ask!

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, May 23, 2018 at 5:57 PM, Marco Oros <marco.oros93@gmail.com> wrote:

I have heard, that default synthesizer will be Windows Onecore and not
Espeak NG. I have a question.
NVDA team will stop implement new versions of Espeak? Or, why this thing
were happened?
Thank You.
Marco Oros



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available:
http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess


Re: About Linux

Mallard
 

Hello guys,


I didn't want to participae in this discussion, because it's O.T. here, but I've followed the thread with quite a bit of interest.


I tried to use Linux many times over the last 20 years, more or less successfully depending on times and distros.


At the moment I don't have a Linux installation on my machine, but I'd like to go back to it.


Since I saw there are a number of very savvy Linux users here, could any of them help me choose the most suitable distro for my current pc?


If anyone is willing to help, please contact me off-list at


mallard@kimabe.eu


and I can give you details. I don't want to continue tuis O.T. here.


Ciao, thanks in advance,

Ollie

Il 23/05/2018 16:22, Antony Stone ha scritto:
So long as you trust yourself never to make a mistake when you have admin /
root privilege on the machine, then by all means use your own computer in this
way.

However, there are good reasons why almost all Linux documentation referring
to the use of the root account or the su / sudo commands advises not to work
with this level of privilege on the machine for longer than necessary, simply
as a method of damage limitation.

A standard user can only damage their own files and not any part of the system.

The root user can damage everything.


Antony.

On Wednesday 23 May 2018 at 16:16:26, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

My Linux computers go nowhere outside the home, and I have an up-to-date
firewall in my up-to-date router, so I think unless one is in coffee shops
with it, you can remove all such things. I turn off the password at log-in
too.
Glenn


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brandon
Cross Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 12:33 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

I'm sorry, but if that's the impression you have, you are much mistaken.
This is not only advisable, it can be dangerous. Stop and think about it
for a second. Why would they make an operating system where you had to
type one command before any other command you type? Doesn't make sense,
does it? Also, remember that you are authenticating each time you do this,
even though it may be set up so that you don't need to use your password
each and every time, which ever command you use with sudo gets elevated to
root status. A little reading will tell you all you need to know. I don't
like it when people spread information that could harm other people's
machines or harm them in some way, accidentally is one thing, but if you
just say oh its ok, you're being intentionally ignorant. Then, what
happens if someone inexperienced comes along and sees this and tries it,
maybe nothing, maybe they type sudo rm -rf * from the root directory, then
bye bye machine.


Re: changing voice rate

richard kurlander <r.kurlander@...>
 

thanks.At 02:08 AM 5/24/2018, you wrote:

Hi


The short cut way is use the nvda key + ctrl key + the down arrow key to
decrease speaking rate. If while still holding down the ctrl key + nvda
key then using the up arrow key will speed it up just reverse to slow it
down. it should be the default when you do that.


Gene nz



On 5/24/2018 5:00 PM, richard kurlander wrote:
when I hit ctrlaltn and nvda comes on voice rate fast how do you
change using newest nvda forgot the keystrokes and where to find them
by hitting the key, don't remember which key.





Re: turning off nvda

richard kurlander <r.kurlander@...>
 

thanks.At 02:05 AM 5/24/2018, you wrote:

Hi


it is the nvda key + letter Q dialogue box will come up with some
options one is quit nvda then tab to ok then press the enter key. it
will then shut down.


Gene nz



On 5/24/2018 5:59 PM, richard kurlander wrote:
how do you turn off nvda?





Re: turning off nvda

Quentin Christensen
 

Hi Richard,

Gene gave you the instructions for exiting NVDA (NVDA+q, then ENTER - and note that the NVDA key will be either INSERT or CAPS LOCK depending on your setup).  One other thing I'll mention just in case it is of interest to you.  We have a "Basic Training for NVDA" module which you might be interested in.  The module is available in electronic text, audio and hardcopy Braille.  See https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/ for details if you are interested.

Of course, you are most welcome to ask questions here, you may find that the training module answers some of them before you need to ask.

Kind regards,

Quentin.

On Thu, May 24, 2018 at 3:59 PM, richard kurlander <r.kurlander@...> wrote:
how do you turn off nvda?







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: changing voice rate

Gene New Zealand <hurrikennyandopo@...>
 

Hi


The short cut way is use the nvda key + ctrl key + the down arrow key to
decrease speaking rate. If while still holding down the ctrl key + nvda
key then using the up arrow key will speed it up just reverse to slow it
down. it should be the default when you do that.


Gene nz

On 5/24/2018 5:00 PM, richard kurlander wrote:
when I hit ctrlaltn and nvda comes on voice rate fast how do you
change using newest nvda forgot the keystrokes and where to find them
by hitting the key, don't remember which key.




Re: turning off nvda

Gene New Zealand <hurrikennyandopo@...>
 

Hi


it is the nvda key + letter Q dialogue box will come up with some
options one is quit nvda then tab to ok then press the enter key. it
will then shut down.


Gene nz

On 5/24/2018 5:59 PM, richard kurlander wrote:
how do you turn off nvda?




turning off nvda

richard kurlander <r.kurlander@...>
 

how do you turn off nvda?


Re: changing voice rate

Quentin Christensen
 

Hi Richard,

There are two ways to adjust the voice rate.  You can use shortcut keys from anywhere (called the "Synth settings ring"):
- Press NVDA+CONTROL+UP ARROW to increase the current speech setting - eg the default is speech rate so this will make it faster.
- Press NVDA+CONTROL+DOWN ARROW to decrease the current setting.
- Press NVDA+CONTROL+LEFT ARROW or NVDA+CONTROL+RIGHT ARROW to move between settings you can adjust.

If you are using Laptop keyboard layout, add SHIFT to those commands (NVDA+CONTROL+SHIFT+UP ARROW to increase, for instance).

Or, you can adjust all the voice settings via the settings dialog.  Press NVDA+CONTROL+V to go to the voice options directly, from where you can tab between options and use the arrows to adjust sliders or spacebar to toggle checkboxes.

The user guide with all the options on this screen is here: https://www.nvaccess.org/files/nvda/documentation/userGuide.html#VoiceSettings

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Thu, May 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM, richard kurlander <r.kurlander@...> wrote:
when I hit ctrlaltn and nvda comes on voice rate fast how do you change using newest nvda forgot the keystrokes and where to find them by hitting the key, don't remember which key.







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


changing voice rate

richard kurlander <r.kurlander@...>
 

when I hit ctrlaltn and nvda comes on voice rate fast how do you change using newest nvda forgot the keystrokes and where to find them by hitting the key, don't remember which key.


Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

hi james.
i am waiting for your help in skype.
thanks so much for your assistance and God bless you!

On 5/24/18, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@softcon.com> wrote:
I'm sorry, this really shouldn't be here, but typing sudo before every
command is *not* necessary.  As I said before, the only time the sudo
command is needed is when you're running a system command.  General
programs, (which most are), does not require a sudo command.  Sudo is
only used when you're configuring the system, or doing something that
requires root access, which is generally only when you're changing
configuration files, or installing programs to the /usr/bin or /usr/sbin
directories. There are very few reasons to use sudo, and if you're using
it before every command, then you're using it incorrectly.


On 5/22/2018 3:08 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Well, it is only open while I have the terminal open, and it is no
more dangerous than using the windows “run as administrator” option
that is in the applications menu.

Also, that is not messed up, anytime you type a command in Linux, you
need to type sudo in front of it, unless you unlock it with sudo su or
sudo –s.

Glenn

*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of
*Brandon Cross
*Sent:* Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:02 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

Well, if you have to type sudo before each command, something is
seriously messed up with your file permissions, you should be able to
write anywhere in your own home directory. Also, telling someone to su
into root is just downright dangerous, you could make sweeping changes
with one command that could break the entire machine. Sudo is an
administrative thing, it elevates your priveleges to do a command, and
only that command, think of it like the secure UAC thing in windows,
it elevates that program to administrative level until it finishes,
like installers. Having programs permanently elevated to
administrative level is dangerous, as it leaves the computer open to
attack.



--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Re: Spotify and NVDA

Gerardo Corripio
 

Me too I haven't found an accessible way to add locally-stored music. I'd say like I ended up going, start from scratch. Good luck! and hope you enjoy Spotify! It's amazing all the music you can come up with!

El 23/05/2018 a las 05:24 p.m., bob jutzi escribió:
I have the three month $9.99 Spotify trial and for the most part find it accessible.  However, I'm finding uploading local fines next to impossible.  Is there a way with NVDA or am I better just starting from scratch and doing this online from my iPhone using Voiceover to add music from Spotify's catalog?

--
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird


Re: Unable to read Field Names in Access 2016

chris miles
 

On 22/05/2018 01:41, Pranav Lal wrote:

Quentin,

<snip You mentioned not being sure if it was the keyboard, if you run your slideshow, and turn input help on (NVDA+1), then press control+shift+s, it should read

PL] Problem solved. I do not know why this did not work when I last tried it. Your input help trick is cool. I am now able to read my speaker notes in slide show mode which is very nice.

 

Pranav

Hi List,


I have recently been using Access 2016 with NVDA and I have had problems.


In table view NVDA cannot read any of the field names when moving from column to column. Also when creating a query, NVDA is unable to report the sort row A for ascending or D for descending, cannot report the criterior row; so unable to create a query without sighted help.


I note that there has not been any work done on NVDA with Access since version 2003 and would like to ask whether or not any update is being considered.


Is there any keystroke in NVDA which would show these missing field names?

   


Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

I'm sorry, this really shouldn't be here, but typing sudo before every command is *not* necessary.  As I said before, the only time the sudo command is needed is when you're running a system command.  General programs, (which most are), does not require a sudo command.  Sudo is only used when you're configuring the system, or doing something that requires root access, which is generally only when you're changing configuration files, or installing programs to the /usr/bin or /usr/sbin directories.  There are very few reasons to use sudo, and if you're using it before every command, then you're using it incorrectly.


On 5/22/2018 3:08 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Well, it is only open while I have the terminal open, and it is no more dangerous than using the windows “run as administrator” option that is in the applications menu.

Also, that is not messed up, anytime you type a command in Linux, you need to type sudo in front of it, unless you unlock it with sudo su or sudo –s.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brandon Cross
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

Well, if you have to type sudo before each command, something is seriously messed up with your file permissions, you should be able to write anywhere in your own home directory. Also, telling someone to su into root is just downright dangerous, you could make sweeping changes with one command that could break the entire machine. Sudo is an administrative thing, it elevates your priveleges to do a command, and only that command, think of it like the secure UAC thing in windows, it elevates that program to administrative level until it finishes, like installers. Having programs permanently elevated to administrative level is dangerous, as it leaves the computer open to attack.



Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: How do I run a portable copy of NVDA from a USB flash drive

Richard Wells
 

Maybe I shouldn't, but I have always used NVDA Portable on the root of my USB media. Other than personal preference, is there any reason for me to stop this practice? Thanks and I will appreciate all information on this topic.

On 5/23/2018 4:00 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
That very much depends how you copied it. I think most people prefer not to have nvda in the root of the  ram drive. I would also add here that in Windows 10, the usability of a portable version of nvda is much reduced over using it in Windows 7, mainly due to many parts of windows only being given access to for an installed bit of software. Thus you might consider with the permission of the machines owner installing nvda on the machine but not making it auto start, so at least the next time you  need to use it it has the best access it can.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Richard Wells" <richwels@gmx.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] How do I run a portable copy of NVDA from a USB flash drive


Just insert the USB Flash Drive, determine the drive letter Windows
gives it, press WIN-KEY+R, type DriveLetter:\NVDA and it will launch.


On 5/22/2018 2:57 PM, Don wrote:

I have successfully created a portable copy of NVDA on my flash drive.
How do I run it on another lap top computer?



Re: orbit reader20 back on sale

JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Ah yes, the Navigator is exactly what I was thinking of. My first PC experience was with that display – no voice at all.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: May 23, 2018 5:48 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] orbit reader20 back on sale

 

Even in the DOS days we had screen readers of sorts.  The navigator used gateway and alva displays had their own reader/driver programs.

 

----- Original Message -----

From: JM Casey

Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] orbit reader20 back on sale

 

Not since the Dos days, I think.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: May 23, 2018 5:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] orbit reader20 back on sale

 

I don't know if Braille displays are ever used without screen-readers when connected to computers.  I don't recall seeing discussions where they are used independently.  I doubt it. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:24 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] orbit reader20 back on sale

 

Hi, Gene,

 

If the Orbit reader can be used with NVDA, then I apologize.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

On 5/23/2018 2:21 PM, Gene wrote:

Assuming the Orbit Reader can be used with NVDA, it is relevant to NVdA and has nothing specifically to do with any version of Windows.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:14 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] orbit reader20 back on sale

 

Hi, Josh,

 

I think this should go on a list like the windows 10 list. It has nothing to do with NVDA.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

On 5/23/2018 1:50 PM, Josh Kennedy wrote:

Hi

I just got an email stating orbit reader20 braille display back on sale tomorrow may 24th. So if you want one now is the time to put in your order.

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

 


Spotify and NVDA

bob jutzi <jutzi1@...>
 

I have the three month $9.99 Spotify trial and for the most part find it accessible. However, I'm finding uploading local fines next to impossible. Is there a way with NVDA or am I better just starting from scratch and doing this online from my iPhone using Voiceover to add music from Spotify's catalog?


Re: About Linux

Ervin, Glenn
 

I always tell folks the Windows key, even though that is a taboo term in Linux.

They usually say super key for the Windows key.

Glenn

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:00 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

The author of the article says that the short cut to start speech is often to hold the alt and command keys and press s.  That's not remotely useful to Windows users.  There is no command key.  Perhaps there is an equivalent or a key to use on a Windows keyboard.  That's a really careless omission.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:36 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

sudo is not necessary for anything in your user space.  The only time sudo is necessary is when you need to change system files.  Otherwise, you shouldn't use sudo, and nobody should use root as their main user account.  I've been using linux since 1992, and I've been doing it with speech, so anyone who claims linux isn't accessible is fooling themselves and others.

This one needs the volume up, as it is hard to hear:

Here’s an article not YouTube, on the accessible Linux distros.

I would put Ubuntu at the top of the list, but it is not at the top of this list.

Since this is a couple of years old, Ubuntu comes with Mate desktop, not Unity as mentioned in this list.

The only thing I don’t like about Vinux and Sonar is that is a bit challenging for a beginner to get Eloquence going on them.

Also, they use older Kernels.

Glenn

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 12:08 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

Here’s a little more, in case others are wondering about getting around in Linux…

Glenn

 

I usually set it to laptop mode, and I use the caps-lock with U I O for prior, current, and next line And J K L For words And M comma  and period For letters.

I believe the numberpad works that way too.

Alt F2 is like tapping the windows key in Windows.

Alt + F1 brings up the programs list, there are three columns, system, places, and accessories, which is where you find common programs, like FireFox and eMail programs.

You can use the applications key like you do in Windows too.

Alt + Tab between windows and alt + F4 to close.

Control + alt + D puts you on the desktop.

Just tab around in programs like Windows.

Control + Alt + T

Puts you in the command-line.

Exit gets you out.

You need to type sudo before each command, or to stay in "administrator", type:

Sudo su or sudo -s

Then you will have to exit sudo and exit again to exit terminal.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

I have some info on the Orca screenreader list as well, here’s  links for the list:

Glenn

Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2018 7:00 AM

Send orca-list mailing list submissions to

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit

or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to

 

You can reach the person managing the list at

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] About Linux

 

Hi,

There are many distro’s of Linux that work with Orca the screenreader, so I don’t want to keep this thread going on this list, since it’s off-topic.

But I will mention that I like Ubuntu and that is the most popular distribution in use over all.

I do subscribe to a Ubuntu list, and there is an Orca list as well.

Folks can eMail me off list for help getting started.

And here is some information on the Ubuntu list.

I suspect that if you follow the link to the Ubuntu list and put subscribe in the subject, you might get subscribed.

It is a low-traffic list.

Info below.

Glenn --

Ubuntu-accessibility mailing list

 

 

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


go fund me website help

 

Hello I am trying to get a go fund me campain

started to see if I an get enuff money to fly down to spring field mo to see one of my blind friends who I have known for 13 years and have never got a chance to see him in person.

I got my campain ready to go and it asks if I want to be able to use this campain as a team

there is a drop down combo box where 3 boxes and I can't find out what is what the other combo boxes read perfictly like picking what kind of campain it is

eg medicle bills dream and wishes etc.

if any one can help me with this it would be cool.

this part of the site is preventing me to post my campain.

thanks

Hank'


--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


Re: About Linux

Gene
 

The author of the article says that the short cut to start speech is often to hold the alt and command keys and press s.  That's not remotely useful to Windows users.  There is no command key.  Perhaps there is an equivalent or a key to use on a Windows keyboard.  That's a really careless omission.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:36 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

sudo is not necessary for anything in your user space.  The only time sudo is necessary is when you need to change system files.  Otherwise, you shouldn't use sudo, and nobody should use root as their main user account.  I've been using linux since 1992, and I've been doing it with speech, so anyone who claims linux isn't accessible is fooling themselves and others.

This one needs the volume up, as it is hard to hear:

Here’s an article not YouTube, on the accessible Linux distros.

I would put Ubuntu at the top of the list, but it is not at the top of this list.

Since this is a couple of years old, Ubuntu comes with Mate desktop, not Unity as mentioned in this list.

The only thing I don’t like about Vinux and Sonar is that is a bit challenging for a beginner to get Eloquence going on them.

Also, they use older Kernels.

Glenn

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 12:08 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

Here’s a little more, in case others are wondering about getting around in Linux…

Glenn

 

I usually set it to laptop mode, and I use the caps-lock with U I O for prior, current, and next line And J K L For words And M comma  and period For letters.

I believe the numberpad works that way too.

Alt F2 is like tapping the windows key in Windows.

Alt + F1 brings up the programs list, there are three columns, system, places, and accessories, which is where you find common programs, like FireFox and eMail programs.

You can use the applications key like you do in Windows too.

Alt + Tab between windows and alt + F4 to close.

Control + alt + D puts you on the desktop.

Just tab around in programs like Windows.

Control + Alt + T

Puts you in the command-line.

Exit gets you out.

You need to type sudo before each command, or to stay in "administrator", type:

Sudo su or sudo -s

Then you will have to exit sudo and exit again to exit terminal.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

I have some info on the Orca screenreader list as well, here’s  links for the list:

Glenn

Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2018 7:00 AM

Send orca-list mailing list submissions to

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit

or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to

 

You can reach the person managing the list at

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] About Linux

 

Hi,

There are many distro’s of Linux that work with Orca the screenreader, so I don’t want to keep this thread going on this list, since it’s off-topic.

But I will mention that I like Ubuntu and that is the most popular distribution in use over all.

I do subscribe to a Ubuntu list, and there is an Orca list as well.

Folks can eMail me off list for help getting started.

And here is some information on the Ubuntu list.

I suspect that if you follow the link to the Ubuntu list and put subscribe in the subject, you might get subscribed.

It is a low-traffic list.

Info below.

Glenn --

Ubuntu-accessibility mailing list

 



Virus-free. www.avast.com