Date   

Re: pauses after punctuation and sentence end in different speech synthesizers

Akshaya Choudhary
 

Maybe you can navigate line by line and press return twice at the end of the stanza, to  indicate the stanza break. This way you won't have problem formatting your poems. At the end of the stanza NVDA will read "BLANK", and you would know of the break. This is how I study my poetry. Of course, while reading the poems of others, it might be difficult, as they might not have formatted it according to your expectations.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: pauses after punctuation and sentence end in different speech synthesizers

Giles Turnbull
 

I would very much like that feature, Abbie. I It is a nightmare trying to figure out which lines have hard returns and which have soft returns. Whenever I send a poem to a magazine, or enter it into a competition, it can be hard work making sure it is formatted correctly! I have a profile set up for editing with formatting, in which I slow the speed a little and have NVDA reading most formatting options, but I have found no way to indicate the difference between a soft return and a hard return ... soft returns are needed in Word at the end of lines within a stanza / verse, and a hard return is needed for a stanza break, where a single blank line is needed between the last line of one stanza and the first line of the next. Sighted people have it easy because they can see on the page how much white space there is between one line and the next ;)


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Gene
 

I don't mind you discussing it but have you tried a forum like Bleeping Computer?  A site like Bleeping Computer would have a better chance of you receiving useful suggestions than pursuing the matter in many other ways because a lot of geeks, not just somewhat knowledgeable users, give help there.  I'm not saying that everyone is a geek but the purpose of the site is to attract very knowledgeable people, among more typical users who offer help. 
 
If you explain in your initial message, that you are blind and explain the problems, you may get the reaction you describe from people who don't read the message carefully but you are likely to get other responses. 
 
If you propose the suggestion I made about the host file and ask how to do this, there is a good chance you will get a response. 
 
I don't know enough about Firewalls to know if you can block one installation of one program.  But the host file can be used to block specific web site access.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 3:10 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)

Well, the reason for asking here is that having mentioned it in other geeky
places the general reply is. avast is probably one of the best anti virus
programs there is, why would you wish to remove it? People on ordinary lists
etc do not seem to realise the issue it gives blind users.

If nobody is interested I'll not mention it again
 The fact is that I have uninstalled it, used avastclear to remove all
files. Turned off auto updates in ccleaner and adjusted all settings in the
new privacy tab of ccleaner to off so it will not any more share with them.
 There seems, once this is done to be no silly running processes of avast
running in the services as there always is when you just uninstall it.
 I suspect that my sighted colleagues are the problem and if a  little
message comes up their reflex action is to click it so it goes away.
 Hence my question about blocking it completely. Yes I'd need to do an audit
and find out what might be doing it. Ccleaner is very handy however since
what we do does produce a lot of useless files and debris.
 Hope this clears it up.
 Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 9:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Then why has no other CCleaner user reported the problem not just on this
list, but on the other two active Windows users lists I'm on?  It doesn't
seem plausible.

How have you tried to remove Avast in the past?  And if you really think its
CCleaner, why not completely remove CCleaner and see what happens?

But rather than do that, doing what I suggest below may yield the wanted
result without doing unnecessary and likely ineffective work.

I don't know how you might stop it.  the question may well be too specific
and essoteric for the list.  Why not ask somewhere like Bleeping Computer
where geeks hang out to help with technical questions that range from simple
to obscure.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:28 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I'm having terrible trouble stopping this anti virus once installed and
removed from making frequent attempts to reinstall itself. I have a
suspicion that Ccleaner is responsible for apparent random downloads in the
background without any input from a user. It then sits there and out of the
blue  comes up as installing.

Does anyone know of a third party program that can spot this and actually
stop it. maybe an entry in Microsofts windows 7 firewall or something.
 Unfortunately, the machine in question is a device used by both sighted and
blind, and its only when I get there and find this inaccessible over active
impossible to remove bit of so called anti virus software that  I get very
annoyed. I want to make it absolutely impossible to install it.
 Any ideas?
 Brian

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Re: writing add ons:

Antony Stone
 

I think http://www.josephsl.net/tutorials is probably what you're looking for.

Antony.

On Saturday 14 July 2018 at 14:16:31, 特種兵 wrote:

By the way, can anyone know Joseph to record a tutorial on developing
nvda addon?
I saw it here a few days ago but accidentally deleted it.

thank you for much
Logo Kuo from Taiwan
--
"I estimate there's a world market for about five computers."

- Thomas J Watson, Chairman of IBM

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: writing add ons:

特種兵
 


By the way, can anyone know Joseph to record a tutorial on developing nvda addon?
I saw it here a few days ago but accidentally deleted it.
thank you for much
Logo Kuo from Taiwan
Ralf Kefferpuetz 於 2018/7/14 下午 03:07 寫道:

Hello,

 

Please visit this 2 links for more information:

https://github.com/nvdaaddons/devguide/wiki/NVDA%20Add-on%20Development%20Guide

https://www.nvaccess.org/files/nvda/documentation/developerGuide.html

 

cheers,

  Ralf

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenny Peyattt jr.
Sent: Samstag, 14. Juli 2018 01:25
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] writing add ons:

 

Hi I was thinking about writing a nvda add on for my printer software and I was wondering what programs I will need to write add ons with?

Kenny Peyatt jr.



Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Devin Prater
 

I'd try speeding up the speech just a little, getting used to that point where you can repeat what the speech says, and keep speeding up until you're where you want to be.




On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 5:16 AM -0500, "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@...> wrote:

Different people have different speeds - both of listening, and reading Braille 
(just as different sighted people can read at different speeds).

I would suggest the choice of synthesiser (which is an entirely personal 
choice - no-one else can tell you what you find easiest and most pleasant to 
work with) is going to make the biggest difference to how fast you can listen.


Antony.

On Saturday 14 July 2018 at 12:12:54, Sociohack AC wrote:

> -- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further? 
> Speed is my main conceen.  
> Regards,
> Sociohack

-- 
I think broken pencils are pointless.

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.




Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Antony Stone
 

Different people have different speeds - both of listening, and reading Braille
(just as different sighted people can read at different speeds).

I would suggest the choice of synthesiser (which is an entirely personal
choice - no-one else can tell you what you find easiest and most pleasant to
work with) is going to make the biggest difference to how fast you can listen.


Antony.

On Saturday 14 July 2018 at 12:12:54, Sociohack AC wrote:

-- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further?
Speed is my main conceen.
Regards,
Sociohack
--
I think broken pencils are pointless.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Claire Potter <claire.potter99@...>
 

Certainly not! I find it much more productive to read braille. Warm regards, Claire Potter, Check out my brand new website: http://www.pottersplace.me.uk/
On 14/07/2018 11:12, Sociohack AC wrote:


-- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further? 
Speed is my main conceen.  
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Akshaya Choudhary
 


-- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further? 
Speed is my main conceen.  
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Claire Potter <claire.potter99@...>
 

Hi, I have the same problem, what I will say is that if you want to read large amounts just be aware that using speech is really tiring, I use braille for that reason ad have a braille display, I find that much easier.

Warm regards, Claire Potter, Check out my brand new website: http://www.pottersplace.me.uk/
On 14/07/2018 10:22, Sociohack AC wrote:

Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers on/

Regards


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

Never had this happen on any of my win7 or 10 units.

Unchecky hasn't had an update in ages.

But if ccleaner is becoming dangerous and virus like, I am going to have to concidder taking it off all my networks, and never using it, I really like to do this from time to time but who knows.

I may have to use a portable one for now its been fine for me.

There are 2 tasks, a skip uac and a ccleaner update task it says its for installing emergency updates to it, but I just hope its not doing this avast thing.

It would be fine if the suite were accessible and working and they listened to users but its not really.

On 7/14/2018 9:02 PM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
The latest CCleaner does not allow unchecky to do anything. As I say i think they are getting wise and even if you do refuse any other installation, its sets a timer and  installs it in the background later on. I wonder if recover is the same as I see that is on the other machine as well.
Brian

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----- Original Message ----- From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure. I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky ( https://unchecky.com/ ) , install it, and leave it there to do its job. It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2. Never take the "typical" install option. Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel






.


Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Akshaya Choudhary
 

Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers on/

Regards


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Sadly Google back up and restore was far too crash prone for me to carry on using it. When it was just google drive it was fine. Dropbox is better in thatrespect.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Cristóbal" <cristobalmuli@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 11:03 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Can’t beat portable versions either.

I have my portable installers in my Google Drive folder and thus am able to access them from either one of my machines. Open and close them as I wish.



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 2:52 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)



CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure. I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky <https://unchecky.com/> , install it, and leave it there to do its job. It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2. Never take the "typical" install option. Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

The latest CCleaner does not allow unchecky to do anything. As I say i think they are getting wise and even if you do refuse any other installation, its sets a timer and installs it in the background later on. I wonder if recover is the same as I see that is on the other machine as well.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure. I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky ( https://unchecky.com/ ) , install it, and leave it there to do its job. It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2. Never take the "typical" install option. Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I see no advertising. You can turn off the sharing data in its set up. it said this was to comply with GDPR, so maybe you have not done this.

I find myself saying that if a company has to go to such underhand lengths to sell its stuff its not very good at selling and I'd avoid it.
I seem to recall it was only about a year back that Ccleaner issued a version with malware in it, and I understand this was disgruntled staff after the take over.

It was not dangerous malware but I imagine was designed to stick two fingers up at avast.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris via Groups.Io" <chrismedley=btinternet.com@groups.io>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I guess this is the free version that’s doing this

As far as I can see the only way to stop automatic downloads is to buy the ccleaner product

Otherwise it cant be turned off along with all the advertising it pops up now 😃



From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: 13 July 2018 21:28
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)

I'm having terrible trouble stopping this anti virus once installed and
removed from making frequent attempts to reinstall itself. I have a
suspicion that Ccleaner is responsible for apparent random downloads in the
background without any input from a user. It then sits there and out of the
blue comes up as installing.

Does anyone know of a third party program that can spot this and actually
stop it. maybe an entry in Microsofts windows 7 firewall or something.
Unfortunately, the machine in question is a device used by both sighted and
blind, and its only when I get there and find this inaccessible over active
impossible to remove bit of so called anti virus software that I get very
annoyed. I want to make it absolutely impossible to install it.
Any ideas?
Brian

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Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

We are still assuming that ccleaner is the source, but the point is, for me to get the machine back into pristine condition will be so long winded when its in use every week would not be realistic. It needs to be patched. I bet the dropbox issue is some unregistered dll, and the other issues is a task somewhere charged with pestering the user. Since I have the same ccleaner here at home and have managed to keep sighted people off, it has also done its damage, but thus far I've managed to avoid any reinstalls of avast itself. I'm thinking of adding it to the firewall blocking but its knowing what to add that is the issue, cos I bet its not going to say its avast is it?
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 9:38 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


The easiest way is to not install it in the first place.

I guess you will just have to reformat to get rid of it.

Its a pitty ccleaner has gone this way, I still use it because its generally good and all I need to use is its cleaning function and most of the checkboxes are checked by default but to be honest, if this is its reality I don't know.




On 7/14/2018 8:28 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
I'm having terrible trouble stopping this anti virus once installed and removed from making frequent attempts to reinstall itself. I have a suspicion that Ccleaner is responsible for apparent random downloads in the background without any input from a user. It then sits there and out of the blue comes up as installing.

Does anyone know of a third party program that can spot this and actually stop it. maybe an entry in Microsofts windows 7 firewall or something.
Unfortunately, the machine in question is a device used by both sighted and blind, and its only when I get there and find this inaccessible over active impossible to remove bit of so called anti virus software that I get very annoyed. I want to make it absolutely impossible to install it.
Any ideas?
Brian

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Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

No you have to go to the ccleaner web site and click on the free version when you do an update. It never asks about anything else most of the time. Not even unchecky spots anything either.

In fact I've been running this version of Ccleaner for some weeks since mid June with no problems and no sign of avast until yesterday. I think its actually a task and one that only runs when a registry entry time period is past a certain time, say a month. At that point it uses the background to download the latest version of avast, then waits for the machine to be idle for a while and than then asks you to install, but even then I think its already installed and all it will do is to run its self and add the autostart to the start up process. The service and disabling of msse will be already done.
Its bad practice, arrogant and invasive.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@ripco.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 1:01 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I would assume it would have installed when you installed CCleaner, not when you ran it. I'm not sure what caused to happen what appeared to happen. I don't use CCleaner and I don't know how it updates itself. In other words, if it updated the program, perhaps it installed Avast then but I'm just speculating.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Desiree Oudinot
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 6:40 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I thought this as well, so it's very possible that I thought the offer got declined when it really wasn't. The odd thing is, Avast only installed after I ran CCleaner for the first time after a fresh installation. So, when exactly does Avast embed itself? I distinctly recall trying to uncheck the offer, thinking I had succeeded, and then going on to the next part of the setup process. Nothing was said about Avast at that point. It was only after I launched CCleaner after installation that it happened. I don't know if it would have continued to try and install afterwards; I switched to the portable version at that point, wanting no further parts of any forced offers.




On 7/13/2018 7:06 PM, Gene wrote:

I didn't say it wouldn't install Avast when you install CCleaner. But the original message said that CCleaner is periodically reinstalled after being uninstalled and it didn't say this only happened when a new version of CCleaner was installed.

If that happened as a general behavior, it would have caused tremendous outcry from those, sighted and blind, using CCleaner who had mistakenly installed Avast and then removed it. Where is that outcry?
Also, given the difficulty and inaccessibility of many decline parts of free software, I suspect that you thought you had declined it, but didn't.

Companies try to sneak software onto machines but the company that owns Avast and CCleaner wouldn't damage its reputation by doing something blatantly illegal such as having Avast installed even when a user specifically declined the offer. The company has a very good reputation and, if for no other reason, that's worth a lot of money.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Desiree Oudinot
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 5:14 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Hi,

I very rarely post on this list, but this message warrants a response.




I, too, have had CCleaner install Avast even when I've declined the offer during installation. Once it's launched, it seems to do something in the background to install it. As a result, I began using the portable version of CCleaner to avoid this problem.




I believe this is unacceptable, but until now, had also never seen anyone discussing the issue, so I figured I had done something to trigger it. But perhaps not.




On 7/13/2018 4:35 PM, Gene wrote:

Then why has no other CCleaner user reported the problem not just on this list, but on the other two active Windows users lists I'm on? It doesn't seem plausible.

How have you tried to remove Avast in the past? And if you really think its CCleaner, why not completely remove CCleaner and see what happens?

But rather than do that, doing what I suggest below may yield the wanted result without doing unnecessary and likely ineffective work.

I don't know how you might stop it. the question may well be too specific and essoteric for the list. Why not ask somewhere like Bleeping Computer where geeks hang out to help with technical questions that range from simple to obscure.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:28 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I'm having terrible trouble stopping this anti virus once installed and
removed from making frequent attempts to reinstall itself. I have a
suspicion that Ccleaner is responsible for apparent random downloads in the
background without any input from a user. It then sits there and out of the
blue comes up as installing.

Does anyone know of a third party program that can spot this and actually
stop it. maybe an entry in Microsofts windows 7 firewall or something.
Unfortunately, the machine in question is a device used by both sighted and
blind, and its only when I get there and find this inaccessible over active
impossible to remove bit of so called anti virus software that I get very
annoyed. I want to make it absolutely impossible to install it.
Any ideas?
Brian

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Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I have also use superantispyware. As long as you use it from the tray icon you can get at things, but if it auto runs the screen never seems to get focus by default. Its a pity they cannot sort out these little focus and listing issues. However my old MSSe seems to still spot the nastier nastiest. I do not believe anyone can sit back and assume all is safe. I find that its the sighted who seem to have less likelihood of spotting their actions end in malware or whatever.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Stephen" <whocrazy@internode.on.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Actually, I just tried out Mallwarebytes today,
and I was quite impressed. I started a 14 day
trial of the premium version, and the
accessibility was better than I expected. It
still has a few rough edges though, but it is
usable for the most part. The instalation was
quite smooth and it's got a good customer
support base, the documentation goes out of it's
way to explain things in easy to understand
terminology without making it feel like they're dumbing things down.
Like I said, for the most part, it is usable,
there are still some minor niggles though, such
as when you go to enter your license code, you
aren't able to review the code that you've entered.
I haven't tried it with Jawas, er.. oops. I mean jaws though.
At 03:17 PM 7/14/2018, you wrote:
I agree about brain.exe.

99.9% of viruses unless you don't have a good script or add blocker that is are either installed by the user or come from scams, spam, scam calls and social enginiering attacks.

SSo yeah we have to use our heads.

I'd like to have something one could rely on, but with the bgt issues, I am sorry to say but antivirus even msse or windows defender is becoming more trouble than they are worth.

I have had to exclude bits of my drive, in fact I have had to exclude all external drives from all virus scans in case I need to transfer things up to them, ofcause if anyone puts something in an external drive which is a virus, there is a problem, then how would I know what I am getting is correct information.

I would really like a good security and utility suite again but I don't think one exists.

If old norton came back or something like it I would probably get it.

Automated things, well, the thing with ccleaner and others is the ability to run them easily from where ever I want rather than bothering round the place.




On 7/14/2018 1:02 PM, Tyler Wood wrote:
Avast, AVG, all decent antivirus programs have now turned into just as much of a resource hog as Mcafee. They've also became 100% inaccessible and these days, the number one key element is to always use brain.exe. Common sense, in other words.


C Cleaner portable will not install these things, I don't think. That might be yet another option to use if you don't want avast being thrown on the machine.


On 13-Jul-2018 6:55 PM, bob jutzi wrote:
Exactly my impressions of Avast and that's been 10 years ago.
From what I'm reading on here, things haven't exactly improved. The only thing worse is McAfee.
The Dell Inspiron desktop I purchased last year came with McAfee and I had no recourse but to first download all drivers, then completely install Windows 10 from scratch.

On 7/13/2018 7:43 PM, Jackie wrote:
I frankly have seldom, if ever, seen an antimalware program that has
real-time protection enabled be uninstalled using the Control Panel
w/o first stopping services. Sometimes you can go down to the systray
(Windows Key b), right click on the icon, & select exit from the
context menu. The program can then be uninstalled that way, ie, via
Control Panel. It all rather depends on the particular piece of
software, but these are techniques that can be of assistance.

On 7/13/18, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
not necessarily. When I've uninstalled antimalware programs in the past,
and read information from the manufacturer about how to do so, the ones I
have uninstalled have said to do so from Programs and Features first and if
that didn't work, to use something else like an uninstall tool.

You can't just turn off services antivirus programs use in many cases
because these services are monitored by the program's self-defence module.
That module is intended to keep malware from doing just that, turning off
the program so the malware can damage the program and infiltrate the machine
once the program is off.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Jackie
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 6:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


In order to uninstall any antivirus software, you first have to stop
the service(s) that it uses. Please go to Control Panel >
Administrative Tools > Services & set any & all services associated
w/the software to disabled. Then stop the service.

On 7/13/18, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
I didn't say it wouldn't install Avast when you install CCleaner. But
the
original message said that CCleaner is periodically reinstalled after
being
uninstalled and it didn't say this only happened when a new version of
CCleaner was installed.

If that happened as a general behavior, it would have caused tremendous
outcry from those, sighted and blind, using CCleaner who had mistakenly
installed Avast and then removed it. Where is that outcry?
Also, given the difficulty and inaccessibility of many decline parts of
free
software, I suspect that you thought you had declined it, but didn't.

Companies try to sneak software onto machines but the company that owns
Avast and CCleaner wouldn't damage its reputation by doing something
blatantly illegal such as having Avast installed even when a user
specifically declined the offer. The company has a very good reputation
and, if for no other reason, that's worth a lot of money.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Desiree Oudinot
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 5:14 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Hi,

I very rarely post on this list, but this message warrants a response.




I, too, have had CCleaner install Avast even when I've declined the offer
during installation. Once it's launched, it seems to do something in the
background to install it. As a result, I began using the portable version
of
CCleaner to avoid this problem.




I believe this is unacceptable, but until now, had also never seen anyone
discussing the issue, so I figured I had done something to trigger it.
But
perhaps not.




On 7/13/2018 4:35 PM, Gene wrote:

  Then why has no other CCleaner user reported the problem not just on
this
list, but on the other two active Windows users lists I'm on? It doesn't
seem plausible.

  How have you tried to remove Avast in the past? And if you really
think
its CCleaner, why not completely remove CCleaner and see what happens?

  But rather than do that, doing what I suggest below may yield the
wanted
result without doing unnecessary and likely ineffective work.

  I don't know how you might stop it. the question may well be too
specific
and essoteric for the list. Why not ask somewhere like Bleeping Computer
where geeks hang out to help with technical questions that range from
simple
to obscure.

  Gene
  ----- Original Message -----

  From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
  Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:28 PM
  To: nvda@groups.io
  Subject: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


  I'm having terrible trouble stopping this anti virus once installed and
  removed from making frequent attempts to reinstall itself. I have a
  suspicion that Ccleaner is responsible for apparent random downloads in
the
  background without any input from a user. It then sits there and out of
the
  blue comes up as installing.

  Does anyone know of a third party program that can spot this and
actually

  stop it. maybe an entry in Microsofts windows 7 firewall or something.
   Unfortunately, the machine in question is a device used by both
sighted
and
  blind, and its only when I get there and find this inaccessible over
active
  impossible to remove bit of so called anti virus software that I get
very

  annoyed. I want to make it absolutely impossible to install it.
   Any ideas?
   Brian

  bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
  Sent via blueyonder.
  Please address personal E-mail to:-
  briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
  in the display name field.









--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com







.


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes the problem is they seem to be completely cavalier about us as a possible customer. if they fixed their access issues then maybe its worth it, but thus far Avast has given me more grief and possibly damaged windows merely because its inaccessible. The problem with my other machine is that as I said in my first post, as its used by sighted people too, many are inattentive and simply click first and then forget about it. I only encountered this because it asked to restart now or later when a sighted person was there trying to record audio. I immediately smelled a rat as all windows updates even dropbox have been disabled as we are on a mobile dongle internet connection and obviously the machine rebooting in the middle of a reading is hardly ideal.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 6:17 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I agree about brain.exe.

99.9% of viruses unless you don't have a good script or add blocker that is are either installed by the user or come from scams, spam, scam calls and social enginiering attacks.

SSo yeah we have to use our heads.

I'd like to have something one could rely on, but with the bgt issues, I am sorry to say but antivirus even msse or windows defender is becoming more trouble than they are worth.

I have had to exclude bits of my drive, in fact I have had to exclude all external drives from all virus scans in case I need to transfer things up to them, ofcause if anyone puts something in an external drive which is a virus, there is a problem, then how would I know what I am getting is correct information.

I would really like a good security and utility suite again but I don't think one exists.

If old norton came back or something like it I would probably get it.

Automated things, well, the thing with ccleaner and others is the ability to run them easily from where ever I want rather than bothering round the place.




On 7/14/2018 1:02 PM, Tyler Wood wrote:
Avast, AVG, all decent antivirus programs have now turned into just as much of a resource hog as Mcafee. They've also became 100% inaccessible and these days, the number one key element is to always use brain.exe. Common sense, in other words.


C Cleaner portable will not install these things, I don't think. That might be yet another option to use if you don't want avast being thrown on the machine.


On 13-Jul-2018 6:55 PM, bob jutzi wrote:
Exactly my impressions of Avast and that's been 10 years ago.
From what I'm reading on here, things haven't exactly improved. The only thing worse is McAfee.
The Dell Inspiron desktop I purchased last year came with McAfee and I had no recourse but to first download all drivers, then completely install Windows 10 from scratch.

On 7/13/2018 7:43 PM, Jackie wrote:
I frankly have seldom, if ever, seen an antimalware program that has
real-time protection enabled be uninstalled using the Control Panel
w/o first stopping services. Sometimes you can go down to the systray
(Windows Key b), right click on the icon, & select exit from the
context menu. The program can then be uninstalled that way, ie, via
Control Panel. It all rather depends on the particular piece of
software, but these are techniques that can be of assistance.

On 7/13/18, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
not necessarily. When I've uninstalled antimalware programs in the past,
and read information from the manufacturer about how to do so, the ones I
have uninstalled have said to do so from Programs and Features first and if
that didn't work, to use something else like an uninstall tool.

You can't just turn off services antivirus programs use in many cases
because these services are monitored by the program's self-defence module.
That module is intended to keep malware from doing just that, turning off
the program so the malware can damage the program and infiltrate the machine
once the program is off.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Jackie
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 6:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


In order to uninstall any antivirus software, you first have to stop
the service(s) that it uses. Please go to Control Panel >
Administrative Tools > Services & set any & all services associated
w/the software to disabled. Then stop the service.

On 7/13/18, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
I didn't say it wouldn't install Avast when you install CCleaner. But
the
original message said that CCleaner is periodically reinstalled after
being
uninstalled and it didn't say this only happened when a new version of
CCleaner was installed.

If that happened as a general behavior, it would have caused tremendous
outcry from those, sighted and blind, using CCleaner who had mistakenly
installed Avast and then removed it. Where is that outcry?
Also, given the difficulty and inaccessibility of many decline parts of
free
software, I suspect that you thought you had declined it, but didn't.

Companies try to sneak software onto machines but the company that owns
Avast and CCleaner wouldn't damage its reputation by doing something
blatantly illegal such as having Avast installed even when a user
specifically declined the offer. The company has a very good reputation
and, if for no other reason, that's worth a lot of money.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Desiree Oudinot
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 5:14 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Hi,

I very rarely post on this list, but this message warrants a response.




I, too, have had CCleaner install Avast even when I've declined the offer
during installation. Once it's launched, it seems to do something in the
background to install it. As a result, I began using the portable version
of
CCleaner to avoid this problem.




I believe this is unacceptable, but until now, had also never seen anyone
discussing the issue, so I figured I had done something to trigger it.
But
perhaps not.




On 7/13/2018 4:35 PM, Gene wrote:

Then why has no other CCleaner user reported the problem not just on
this
list, but on the other two active Windows users lists I'm on? It doesn't
seem plausible.

How have you tried to remove Avast in the past? And if you really
think
its CCleaner, why not completely remove CCleaner and see what happens?

But rather than do that, doing what I suggest below may yield the
wanted
result without doing unnecessary and likely ineffective work.

I don't know how you might stop it. the question may well be too
specific
and essoteric for the list. Why not ask somewhere like Bleeping Computer
where geeks hang out to help with technical questions that range from
simple
to obscure.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:28 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I'm having terrible trouble stopping this anti virus once installed and
removed from making frequent attempts to reinstall itself. I have a
suspicion that Ccleaner is responsible for apparent random downloads in
the
background without any input from a user. It then sits there and out of
the
blue comes up as installing.

Does anyone know of a third party program that can spot this and
actually

stop it. maybe an entry in Microsofts windows 7 firewall or something.
Unfortunately, the machine in question is a device used by both
sighted
and
blind, and its only when I get there and find this inaccessible over
active
impossible to remove bit of so called anti virus software that I get
very

annoyed. I want to make it absolutely impossible to install it.
Any ideas?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.










--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com









.


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes just try to disable the one for MSSe and you will see it comes back on again! Avast is far more cleave, even if you remove its files it has them soewhere else and puts them allback hence the reason avastclear has to run in safe mode.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@ripco.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 12:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


not necessarily. When I've uninstalled antimalware programs in the past, and read information from the manufacturer about how to do so, the ones I have uninstalled have said to do so from Programs and Features first and if that didn't work, to use something else like an uninstall tool.

You can't just turn off services antivirus programs use in many cases because these services are monitored by the program's self-defence module. That module is intended to keep malware from doing just that, turning off the program so the malware can damage the program and infiltrate the machine once the program is off.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Jackie
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 6:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


In order to uninstall any antivirus software, you first have to stop
the service(s) that it uses. Please go to Control Panel >
Administrative Tools > Services & set any & all services associated
w/the software to disabled. Then stop the service.

On 7/13/18, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
I didn't say it wouldn't install Avast when you install CCleaner. But the
original message said that CCleaner is periodically reinstalled after being
uninstalled and it didn't say this only happened when a new version of
CCleaner was installed.

If that happened as a general behavior, it would have caused tremendous
outcry from those, sighted and blind, using CCleaner who had mistakenly
installed Avast and then removed it. Where is that outcry?
Also, given the difficulty and inaccessibility of many decline parts of free
software, I suspect that you thought you had declined it, but didn't.

Companies try to sneak software onto machines but the company that owns
Avast and CCleaner wouldn't damage its reputation by doing something
blatantly illegal such as having Avast installed even when a user
specifically declined the offer. The company has a very good reputation
and, if for no other reason, that's worth a lot of money.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Desiree Oudinot
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 5:14 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Hi,

I very rarely post on this list, but this message warrants a response.




I, too, have had CCleaner install Avast even when I've declined the offer
during installation. Once it's launched, it seems to do something in the
background to install it. As a result, I began using the portable version of
CCleaner to avoid this problem.




I believe this is unacceptable, but until now, had also never seen anyone
discussing the issue, so I figured I had done something to trigger it. But
perhaps not.




On 7/13/2018 4:35 PM, Gene wrote:

Then why has no other CCleaner user reported the problem not just on this
list, but on the other two active Windows users lists I'm on? It doesn't
seem plausible.

How have you tried to remove Avast in the past? And if you really think
its CCleaner, why not completely remove CCleaner and see what happens?

But rather than do that, doing what I suggest below may yield the wanted
result without doing unnecessary and likely ineffective work.

I don't know how you might stop it. the question may well be too specific
and essoteric for the list. Why not ask somewhere like Bleeping Computer
where geeks hang out to help with technical questions that range from simple
to obscure.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:28 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


I'm having terrible trouble stopping this anti virus once installed and
removed from making frequent attempts to reinstall itself. I have a
suspicion that Ccleaner is responsible for apparent random downloads in
the
background without any input from a user. It then sits there and out of
the
blue comes up as installing.

Does anyone know of a third party program that can spot this and actually

stop it. maybe an entry in Microsofts windows 7 firewall or something.
Unfortunately, the machine in question is a device used by both sighted
and
blind, and its only when I get there and find this inaccessible over
active
impossible to remove bit of so called anti virus software that I get very

annoyed. I want to make it absolutely impossible to install it.
Any ideas?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.










--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com