Date   

Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Jackie
 

It's absolutely true, Brian V. I know of a certainty that some of us
have tried to engage w/the authors of security software. The results
have been pretty mixed, to say the least, & that's the very polite,
highly edited version, if you understand me.

What can make translation of commands difficult is when a sighted
person says, "click on the gear icon in the upper left corner of the
screen", for example, rather than identifying it by its text label,
i.e., "settings". It's just hard sometimes for blind folks to know
what all these icons look like, &, of course, they change w/various
iterations of a particular program at times. So, there can indeed be a
gap. The other thing that can make it hard is that many times when
fighting malware, we ask folks to boot into safe mode, which is
obviously somewhat problematic for a person requiring access to
assistive technology. Windows 10 has made some strides in this regard,
& there have been some registry hacks in the past to help w/this, but
clearly it's still a problem for a lot of folks.

1 of the things I was thinking about as regards Bleeping Computer is
their music during downloads. I have contacted them, explaining that
this is a violation of accessibility best practices, but, so far as I
know, the practice still continues. It does really amaze me how few
developers know about accessibility guidelines. I recently engaged the
folks who develop a particular WordPress plugin because their software
had become inaccessible when they upgraded versions. The responses I
received were pretty disconcerting, i.e., they said they would
"redraw" the checkbox to make it look like the classic 1, & then they
told me I was just missing features of the previous version because of
plugin conflicts. Uh, well, no. They finally got it right, but only
after I told them that I would really prefer they not reply to me
again, & indeed would find doing so disrespectful, until they read
some WCAG 2.0 materials, for which I provided links. (Yes, I'm aware
of 2.1, but those considerations weren't relevant here). So, it can be
pretty disheartening & an uphill battle, Brian V. 1 thing I think that
really helped when engaging the developers of that particular security
plugin was when a sighted guy jumped in & informed them it was an
accessibility nightmare. So I personally appreciate folks like you &
him who are in the arena helping us.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 12:03 PM, Jackie wrote:


Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of &
attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.
Hardly a shock, really.   The entirety of individuals with disabilities that
need special access to use computers is the proverbial drop in an ocean.
You are not the target demographic of any general purpose computer support
forum.

That being said, it's not the responsibility of random volunteers out there
in cyberspace to presume someone asking a question requires any sort of
consideration for assistive technology, regardless of the type, unless they
identify themselves as such.   Even then, a lot of the questions aren't
directly related to issues of access to begin with.  I expect, and have
every reason to expect, individuals who are blind to be able to "translate
into screen-reader commands" things that are given in point-and-click
nomenclature.  I have to translate in the opposite direction, and it's far
from difficult.

If your question has something to do with accessibility on a general forum
it's not likely to get an answer simply because the number of blind users
who go outside groups such as this one are incredibly small.   Any minority
has to engage the broader world, as the broader world is not going to seek
you out.  'Twas ever thus.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have eloquence set to 65 percent 112 words a minute

it took me a couple of years to get my brain trained to under stand the speech that fast but that is what I have mine set at


On 7/14/2018 2:22 AM, Sociohack AC wrote:
Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers on/

Regards

-- 
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


NVDA focus problem.

John Isige
 

Hi all. I've noticed this for a couple of versions of both NVDA and Windows 10. When I switch windows with alt-tab, it seems like NVDA doesn't get full focus. For example, suppose I'm listening to a track, so I have two windows open, a Windows Explorer window with files, and Foobar 2000, or Winamp, or whatever media player I'm using. I want to alt-tab, let's say to turn repeat on or off or to see how much time remains in the file.


If I do that, it seems like the commands work, but NVDA doesn't read the window. For instance, right now if I play a song and alt-tab to Winamp's window, i can hit keys and they work, e.g. 'v' to stop, 'x' to play. But if I read the window title with NVDA-t, it says "explorer". The title is read correctly with alt-tab, but when I release alt-tab, I seem to be both in the window, and not in the window, as it were. The commands for the program work, but NVDA things, e.g. hitting ctrl-shift-r in Winamp or Foobar to get the remaining time, don't.


Is there a way to fix this? A different screen resolution or something? In theory mine's set to 1024/768, unless Windows changed it after an update. BTW this gets fixed if I alt-tab back to another window, release alt-tab until that window comes up, and then alt-tab back to the other window, Foobar or whatever. When I do that it reads like it should and NVDA commands work and all. That's nothing earth-shattering of course, but it is fairly annoying, since it happens on a regular basis.


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 12:03 PM, Jackie wrote:
Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of & attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.
Hardly a shock, really.   The entirety of individuals with disabilities that need special access to use computers is the proverbial drop in an ocean.  You are not the target demographic of any general purpose computer support forum.

That being said, it's not the responsibility of random volunteers out there in cyberspace to presume someone asking a question requires any sort of consideration for assistive technology, regardless of the type, unless they identify themselves as such.   Even then, a lot of the questions aren't directly related to issues of access to begin with.  I expect, and have every reason to expect, individuals who are blind to be able to "translate into screen-reader commands" things that are given in point-and-click nomenclature.  I have to translate in the opposite direction, and it's far from difficult.

If your question has something to do with accessibility on a general forum it's not likely to get an answer simply because the number of blind users who go outside groups such as this one are incredibly small.   Any minority has to engage the broader world, as the broader world is not going to seek you out.  'Twas ever thus.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Rob Hudson
 

Cristbal <cristobalmuli@gmail.com> wrote:
That's impressive. Lemme guess, you were an early adopter of Braille?
I was born pretty much blind, and I learned braille while the baby sighties were struggling to make periods with little pencils, yes. Having learned braille so early, it was all I knew and therefore I had nothing to unlearn.


NVDA Technical Support: part 2 posted, things to do for part 3 on july 21st

 

Hi all,

 

The second part of NVDA Technical Support: An Introduction webinar is now up:

https://www.josephsl.net/files/NVDATechSupportWebinar2.mp3

 

If you are curious about how the log file works or wanting to know how to understand log entries, this is the part you don’t want to skip.

 

Also, the third and final webinar in this series will take place on July 21, 2018 at 11 AM Pacific (18:00 UTC). We’ll go over recognizing and troubleshooting common NVDA problems. The location is the same: josephsl.net TeamTalk server.

 

Until then, help at least two people on various channels (users list, Twitter, Facebook, etc.), with at least one of them involving reading and understanding NVDA log. While doing that, come up with at least three problems you or users may encounter as they use NVDA.

 

Lastly, if there is sufficient demand, I’ll host a webinar in fall 2018 (around the time NVDA 2018.3 is being finalized) on how to use Remote Support add-on for its intended purpose: technical support, including attitudes, procedures, and activities people should NOT do with this add-on.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Cristóbal
 

That's impressive. Lemme guess, you were an early adopter of Braille? I
can't recall many instances of someone who learned Braille beyond a really
early age where they could read out loud at the rate and fluidity of a
sighted person with print. At least not for an extended period of time.
I’m sure there have to be exceptions to the rule as with most things, but
I'll bet it's pretty rare.
I just wish NVDA would get better at Braille support. With my Brailliant BI
40, can't really make use of the command keys.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rob Hudson
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 8:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Cristóbal <cristobalmuli@gmail.com> wrote:
I cant’ even imagine trying to read a book or anything really for an
extended period of time in Braille. Much less at a rate of speed that would
make it even remotely close to synthesizer reading and comprehension.

I am a competent enough braille reader that I gave some thought to working
for a company narrating things on tape, or mp3, or whatever they do
nowadays. When I was in school, I got called on to read aloud in English
class more than almost anyone else there.
The only problem I see is that if i'm reading books in audible format, the
clicking of the braille display will be heard. I guess a noise gate could
filter that out, but that adds more processing time, which adds more
expense, which brings the cost to benefit ratio of hiring me too out of
balance. Another dream down the tubes.


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Jackie
 

Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of
& attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
I will believe that CCleaner installs Avast after the fact and on its own
the first time I encounter it, and not before.

I've got 5 machines in my household, and on 4 of them CCleaner is
assiduously kept up to date.   I have not yet had it do anything unexpected
and there is no business that would be insane enough to risk alienating a
massive user base, and creating a PR nightmare, by "deciding for you" after
an installation that something else entirely needs to be installed.

I haven't had a bit of trouble with Google Backup & Sync, either.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Sarah k Alawami
 

I’m at 80 wpm. I used to be at 100 I can listen though at about 350 to 400 wpm, or even faster. Just practice practice practice is all I can say.

On Jul 14, 2018, at 8:09 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I've seen Braille readers read at speeds I estimate to be perhaps 250 or 300 words per minute.  Most Braille readers I've observed have been much slower, tending, by my rough guess, to read at around 180 or 170 words per minute.  These are my observations of about fifteen or twenty Braille readers, many of them, reading Braille since grammar school.  It is not a proper sample but to me, it is suggestive.
 
Are there techniques that slower Braille readers can use to significantly increase their speed?  I don't know,  Did some of these people learn to read Braille in different ways in terms of technique?  I don't know.  but that appears to me to be suggestive of the situation as it stands.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:12 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


-- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further? 
Speed is my main conceen.  
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: Urgently need help! (about edit form in Word2010 with NVDA)

Jackie
 

Hello. Your English is far better than I can speak whatever your
native language is. Don't worry about it, please. As long as we can
understand each other, we're good. What's your name?

As to your problem, I rather suspect that your form is in protected
mode. You should save it in order to disable that. I recommend saving
it to a different name than the original, so you'll always have that 1
as a backup in case the form you're working with somehow gets messed
up (it happens). Also, when you do save it, the computer will want to
save it to a temporary folder. Browse to your documents folder or
another of your choosing & save it there instead.

Then you can use the tab & shift-tab key to fill in the fields.

Please let me know if my instructions are clear &/or if they help.
Good luck & much success on your thesis.

On 7/14/18, prem.translator@gmail.com <prem.translator@gmail.com> wrote:
I recieved a form which is the templet for my Thesis. However, when I open
the document I pressed enter and type down some information, it seems that
the information didn't appear in the edit box, but before it. Moreover, it
appeared one line for each information instead of in the same line like in
the form.
e.g.
There are three edit boxes in the same line, Title, firstname and surname,
but the information I put is not in the box and separated to be one
information for each line.

How can I deal with it?
Please help me and really sorry for my English.



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Urgently need help! (about edit form in Word2010 with NVDA)

prem.translator@...
 

I recieved a form which is the templet for my Thesis. However, when I open the document I pressed enter and type down some information, it seems that the information didn't appear in the edit box, but before it. Moreover, it appeared one line for each information instead of in the same line like in the form.
e.g.
There are three edit boxes in the same line, Title, firstname and surname, but the information I put is not in the box and separated to be one information for each line.

How can I deal with it?
Please help me and really sorry for my English.


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Rob Hudson
 

Cristbal <cristobalmuli@gmail.com> wrote:
I cant even imagine trying to read a book or anything really for an extended period of time in Braille. Much less at a rate of speed that would make it even remotely close to synthesizer reading and comprehension.
I am a competent enough braille reader that I gave some thought to working for a company narrating things on tape, or mp3, or whatever they do nowadays. When I was in school, I got called on to read aloud in English class more than almost anyone else there.
The only problem I see is that if i'm reading books in audible format, the clicking of the braille display will be heard. I guess a noise gate could filter that out, but that adds more processing time, which adds more expense, which brings the cost to benefit ratio of hiring me too out of balance. Another dream down the tubes.


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Cristóbal
 

I’m a pretty compitant Braille reader. My general observation is that for the really fast or those who use/prefer Braille learned the skill from a  really, really  early age and didn’t have to ever transition from sighted reading. Most likely people who have either been blind all their life or had no useable vision from again, a very early age. Not that someone later in life couldn’t pick up the skill, but I’m going to guess that even the most dedicated adopters of Braille in these circumstances would never be able to reach the level or proficiency of an early adopter. Even prisoners  who become Braille transcribers physically look at the Braille. I’m sure it has to do with something in the brain structure and all the funky connectors that are going on when you’re very young with absorbing information In a tactile form instead of visually and so on.

My vision loss was gradual and while I picked up Braille while I could still see, it wasn’t until my teens that I had to really give up print.

I cant’ even imagine trying to read a book or anything really for an extended period of time in Braille. Much less at a rate of speed that would make it even remotely close to synthesizer reading and comprehension. Mind you, I went to college out of the country and got my degree mainly with the old school methods of readers and my own Braille notes. So it’s not that I’m adverse to Braille per say, but man, talk about shutter at the thought of going full Braille. I would find it physically and mentally exhausting.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 8:09 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I've seen Braille readers read at speeds I estimate to be perhaps 250 or 300 words per minute.  Most Braille readers I've observed have been much slower, tending, by my rough guess, to read at around 180 or 170 words per minute.  These are my observations of about fifteen or twenty Braille readers, many of them, reading Braille since grammar school.  It is not a proper sample but to me, it is suggestive.

 

Are there techniques that slower Braille readers can use to significantly increase their speed?  I don't know,  Did some of these people learn to read Braille in different ways in terms of technique?  I don't know.  but that appears to me to be suggestive of the situation as it stands.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:12 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 


-- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further? 
Speed is my main conceen.  
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: Microsoft Edge is Starting to Grow on Me.

Kevin <kleeva5@...>
 

In Edge all the shortcut keys ctrl+j and ctrl+I works, at least with jaws 2018!

Are you having a problem with NVDA in Edge saying entering navigation, exiting navigation; entering search, exiting search etc…

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Kenny
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 9:52 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Microsoft Edge is Starting to Grow on Me.

 

Good day,

 

 

Well with Joseph's announcement about the NVDA Try Build, I decided to

invest more time in using Microsoft's applications on my Windows 10 PC.

 

 

Started things off with the Microsoft Edge browser.

 

 

Not sure if it's the new Try-Build or a lot of changes have recently

been made to Edge overall, but it works pretty damn well with NVDA.

 

 

NVDA reads All of the push notification bar messages automatically. It

also informs me when the page has fully loaded (Loading complete.) Most

of the NVDA quick navigation key shortcuts do work to quickly jump

through web content.

 

 

Love... love... love... the Reading View ([Ctrl]+[Shift]+[r]) feature of

Edge. This alone is starting to make me a Chrome to Edge convert.

 

 

I hate to say it, but managing Favorites in Edge is much much easier to

do then with Chrome in my humble opinion. Microsoft uses a traditional

Treeview structure in their manager. Very nice!

 

 

The only problem I'm having is when I find myself sometimes being placed

in the toolbar icons pain of Edge. I quickly jump back to the web page

content by pressing [F6]. I just get annoyed with this at times.

 

 

Curious why they don't implement a shortcut key to display that entire

pain (Similar to [Ctrl]+[i] for Favorites, [Ctrl]+[h] for History, and

[Ctrl]+[j] for Downloads?) I could simply hit the [Escape] key to

hide/dismiss it again.

 

 

Reading Joseph's recent email regarding the Try-Build of NVDA being

released and us really caring about the changes Microsoft is

implementing all the time to make their line of Windows applications

more accessible got me thinking.

 

 

Why can't I give their programs a chance? Yes, in the past I've

experienced a lot of problems with their applications. That doesn't mean

they've not made efforts to correct things (Due to feedback from Insider

testers and bug reports.)

 

 

Time for me to start using the free tools Microsoft has developed and

stop searching for replacements. And I mean all of the tools (Even the

bug report and feedback submission tools.) This is key to helping

Microsoft fix things they may not yet be aware of.

 

 

By the way, if you want a nice resource listing Microsoft Edge keyboard

shortcuts:

 

Visit

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/5620-microsoft-edge-keyboard-shortcuts-list.html

 

 

It really has morphed into a pretty good browser. I'm going to start

using it more.

 

-Kenny

 

 

 


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Gene
 

I've seen Braille readers read at speeds I estimate to be perhaps 250 or 300 words per minute.  Most Braille readers I've observed have been much slower, tending, by my rough guess, to read at around 180 or 170 words per minute.  These are my observations of about fifteen or twenty Braille readers, many of them, reading Braille since grammar school.  It is not a proper sample but to me, it is suggestive.
 
Are there techniques that slower Braille readers can use to significantly increase their speed?  I don't know,  Did some of these people learn to read Braille in different ways in terms of technique?  I don't know.  but that appears to me to be suggestive of the situation as it stands.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:12 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


-- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further? 
Speed is my main conceen.  
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

I will believe that CCleaner installs Avast after the fact and on its own the first time I encounter it, and not before.

I've got 5 machines in my household, and on 4 of them CCleaner is assiduously kept up to date.   I have not yet had it do anything unexpected and there is no business that would be insane enough to risk alienating a massive user base, and creating a PR nightmare, by "deciding for you" after an installation that something else entirely needs to be installed.

I haven't had a bit of trouble with Google Backup & Sync, either.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Gene
 

You may find speech tiring.  That is your reaction and can't be generalized.  I would much rather listen to speech than read Braille.  Different people react differently to Braille and speech.  I suspect it has partly something to do with how brain structure and function differ in different people. 
 
I've read a lot of Braille and I find speech for me, to be much faster if I listen at fast speeds and not to require the kind of work, for me, in the exspenditure of effort, that Braille does. 
 
If I listen to a bad synthesizer, that is fatiguing and requires work.  Listening to a good one doesn't.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:07 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Hi, I have the same problem, what I will say is that if you want to read large amounts just be aware that using speech is really tiring, I use braille for that reason ad have a braille display, I find that much easier.

Warm regards, Claire Potter, Check out my brand new website: http://www.pottersplace.me.uk/
On 14/07/2018 10:22, Sociohack AC wrote:
Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers on/

Regards


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Gene
 

This message is long but it may be quite helpful.
 
Maybe someone can tell you what variant they like and that may help narrow down the ones you try but there response may be different than yours to different variants.
 
I don't like e-speak in any variant.  Some variants are a little better than others but you can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear, as the cliché has it. 
 
Why not try the SAPI 5 Eloquence demo.  If you like Eloquence, in my opinion, it is one of the best synthesizers for intelligibility at fast speeds, and it pronounces more words correctly than other synthesizers I've used and tried.  That may be the answer. 
 
As for trying different variants of E-Speak, have you noticed that when you move from variant to variant in the list, speech changes to that variant when the announcement of the name of the variant is made?  That may help you determine which variants you want to try and which ones are less harsh and annoying. 
 
When trying different variants, it is important to know that if you don't close the program while using a different speech synthesizer or variant or while speed settings are different, then after trying something, you can immediately return to your original synthesizer, variant, and other settings by using the command control NVDA key r.  You will hear "configuration applied" spoken. 
 
That means that the configuration you were using before you changed anything is being used again.  If you close the program, it saves whatever changes you have made and you have lost the old settings.  The settings NVDA is using are the saved configuration.  When you close NVDA, it saves the configuration you are currently using.
 
If you don't want this to happen so you don't accidentally save settings you don't want to make permanent, do the following:
Issue the command control NVDA key g.
The general settings dialog will open.  Tab to a check box that says save settings on exit or something very similar.  Uncheck it with the space gbar.  Tab to and activate the ok button.  The dialog will close.  But the setting has been changed, not saved as a part of the saved configuration.  To manually save settings permanently, issue the command control NVDA key c.  Now, you will never accidentally save settings by closing NVDA or by rebooting, when NVDA is running, which will close NVDA and thus unintentionally save temporary settings.
 
You will now only save settings permanently when you want to. 
 
Suppose you want to change speech settings or any other settings for a specific use.  You can now do so, and when you want to use the other settings again, the ones you have permanently saved, use the command I told you about at the outset, control NVDA key r.  You don't have to waste time manually setting things back to how they were before.  You have instantly gone back to all the old settings with one command. 
 
In my strong opinion, automatically save settings on exit should not be the default command.  there is such a thing as too much automation.  People should be expected to learn certain things about programs they use and how to manually save settings is one of them.  It is very bad practice to have a program assume that someone wants to save settings any time they reboot or close a program.  If I want to read a specific thing at 400 words a minute and I usually read at 350 words per minute, if I want punctuation set to most for proofreading one document and want punctuation off as a general setting, these temporary changes should not be saved if my computer spontaneously reboots because of a technical problem or I forget and reboot for some reason. 
 
If I want to use certain browse mode settings on one web site, I should be able to do so and not run the risk that they will be unintentionally saved.
 
Those learning the program should have the freedom to try any settings they wish without accidentally having them be saved. 
 

For those who are persuaded to an extent by ,
Gene----- Original Message -----

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 4:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers on/

Regards


Re: pauses after punctuation and sentence end in different speech synthesizers

Akshaya Choudhary
 

Maybe you can navigate line by line and press return twice at the end of the stanza, to  indicate the stanza break. This way you won't have problem formatting your poems. At the end of the stanza NVDA will read "BLANK", and you would know of the break. This is how I study my poetry. Of course, while reading the poems of others, it might be difficult, as they might not have formatted it according to your expectations.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: pauses after punctuation and sentence end in different speech synthesizers

Giles Turnbull
 

I would very much like that feature, Abbie. I It is a nightmare trying to figure out which lines have hard returns and which have soft returns. Whenever I send a poem to a magazine, or enter it into a competition, it can be hard work making sure it is formatted correctly! I have a profile set up for editing with formatting, in which I slow the speed a little and have NVDA reading most formatting options, but I have found no way to indicate the difference between a soft return and a hard return ... soft returns are needed in Word at the end of lines within a stanza / verse, and a hard return is needed for a stanza break, where a single blank line is needed between the last line of one stanza and the first line of the next. Sighted people have it easy because they can see on the page how much white space there is between one line and the next ;)