Date   

Re: Urgently need help! (about edit form in Word2010 with NVDA)

 

It sounds like whoever created the form didn't know what one does at the end to allow it to be a fill in form.  I am presuming this thing is a document template, that is, a dotx file, not a docx file, which is a normal word document.

The creator should have put protection on the document template that allows the end user only to fill out forms.  After the form fields are filled in it is possible to take all protection off, if that's necessary.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: NVDA focus problem.

Kenny Peyattt jr.
 

I am thinking about getting one of those laptops. Is it a touch screen or doe it just have a regular screen.
Kenny Peyatt jr.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of George McCoy
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 3:42 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA focus problem.

Hi John,

I have the same problem. You have described it perfectly. It certainly is
annoying.

I'm running windows 10 pro 64 bit on a HP Elitebook 8440W.

George

-----Original Message-----
From: John Isige
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 12:46 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA focus problem.

Hi all. I've noticed this for a couple of versions of both NVDA and
Windows 10. When I switch windows with alt-tab, it seems like NVDA
doesn't get full focus. For example, suppose I'm listening to a track,
so I have two windows open, a Windows Explorer window with files, and
Foobar 2000, or Winamp, or whatever media player I'm using. I want to
alt-tab, let's say to turn repeat on or off or to see how much time
remains in the file.


If I do that, it seems like the commands work, but NVDA doesn't read the
window. For instance, right now if I play a song and alt-tab to Winamp's
window, i can hit keys and they work, e.g. 'v' to stop, 'x' to play. But
if I read the window title with NVDA-t, it says "explorer". The title is
read correctly with alt-tab, but when I release alt-tab, I seem to be
both in the window, and not in the window, as it were. The commands for
the program work, but NVDA things, e.g. hitting ctrl-shift-r in Winamp
or Foobar to get the remaining time, don't.


Is there a way to fix this? A different screen resolution or something?
In theory mine's set to 1024/768, unless Windows changed it after an
update. BTW this gets fixed if I alt-tab back to another window, release
alt-tab until that window comes up, and then alt-tab back to the other
window, Foobar or whatever. When I do that it reads like it should and
NVDA commands work and all. That's nothing earth-shattering of course,
but it is fairly annoying, since it happens on a regular basis.


Re: Urgently need help! (about edit form in Word2010 with NVDA)

Adriani Botez
 

Hello,

 

due to the several methods to create a form in MS Word, we need an example document to help you efficiently.

 

If the form is like a table, where the Text (first name) is in the first column and the form field itself in the second column, then you can just select the formfield in the second column and delete it or just replace it with your first name.

If the edit field cannot be deleted, then put the cursor on it and press the context menu key. Then press downarrow until you hear something about “edit control” or something like that. Open that dialog and Edit there your text.

 

 

Best

Adriani

 

 

Von: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> Im Auftrag von prem.translator@...
Gesendet: Samstag, 14. Juli 2018 17:38
An: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Betreff: [nvda] Urgently need help! (about edit form in Word2010 with NVDA)

 

I recieved a form which is the templet for my Thesis. However, when I open the document I pressed enter and type down some information, it seems that the information didn't appear in the edit box, but before it. Moreover, it appeared one line for each information instead of in the same line like in the form.
e.g.
There are three edit boxes in the same line, Title, firstname and surname, but the information I put is not in the box and separated to be one information for each line.

How can I deal with it?
Please help me and really sorry for my English.


Re: NVDA focus problem.

George McCoy <slr1bpz@...>
 

Hi John,

I have the same problem. You have described it perfectly. It certainly is annoying.

I'm running windows 10 pro 64 bit on a HP Elitebook 8440W.

George

-----Original Message-----
From: John Isige
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 12:46 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA focus problem.

Hi all. I've noticed this for a couple of versions of both NVDA and
Windows 10. When I switch windows with alt-tab, it seems like NVDA
doesn't get full focus. For example, suppose I'm listening to a track,
so I have two windows open, a Windows Explorer window with files, and
Foobar 2000, or Winamp, or whatever media player I'm using. I want to
alt-tab, let's say to turn repeat on or off or to see how much time
remains in the file.


If I do that, it seems like the commands work, but NVDA doesn't read the
window. For instance, right now if I play a song and alt-tab to Winamp's
window, i can hit keys and they work, e.g. 'v' to stop, 'x' to play. But
if I read the window title with NVDA-t, it says "explorer". The title is
read correctly with alt-tab, but when I release alt-tab, I seem to be
both in the window, and not in the window, as it were. The commands for
the program work, but NVDA things, e.g. hitting ctrl-shift-r in Winamp
or Foobar to get the remaining time, don't.


Is there a way to fix this? A different screen resolution or something?
In theory mine's set to 1024/768, unless Windows changed it after an
update. BTW this gets fixed if I alt-tab back to another window, release
alt-tab until that window comes up, and then alt-tab back to the other
window, Foobar or whatever. When I do that it reads like it should and
NVDA commands work and all. That's nothing earth-shattering of course,
but it is fairly annoying, since it happens on a regular basis.


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Jackie
 

Brian V, I love your new signature! Yeah--I know--who has a life &
still reads those?--but anyway...

There are developers who are beginning to take accessibility
seriously. Microsoft, Apple, even WordPress & drupal have committed to
conformance w/WCAG 2.0 at the AA level. They are, sadly, the
exceptions, & even some of their efforts are pretty spotty, but at
least, as you correctly note, it's now a consideration than it was
before. NVDA is also helping by allowing testers a free screen reader
w/which to test the accessibility of their software, at least on
Windows, though Narrator is also now becoming an acceptable candidate.

Advocacy is still the best tool, but, sadly, many do not know how to
do this effectively. Knowledge, either acquired formally or via
self-education is the best advocacy method, but so many don't wish to
acquire it, or don't know how to get started if they do. The blindness
organizations would do well to put out materials regarding that, but
I've not seen any thus far.

In a previous life I, too, have done work w/the cognitively disabled,
& it is absolutely brutally hard. Fixing hacked websites & infected
computers is a breeze compared to it, & that's not easy work by any
stretch. The 1 real blessing of working w/those who have cognitive
disabilities is that you become almost hyper-aware of the most minimal
progress. & occasionally, there are those breakthroughs that seem
nearly miracuous. But observance of the nearly infinitesimal is, I
think, 1 of the greatest blessing of doing that work, as it carries
over to the rest of life.

Thank you for your work on our behalf.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Jackie,

          And you are the perfect example of just the kind of pushing that
helps to make the world better.   As a sighted person who came to assistive
technology for the blind and the visually impaired relatively late in life,
I can say that most of the attitude you get is secondary to ignorance, and
the fear of revealing same, and because the thought of accessibility never
crossed the developer's mind.   I was a developer for many years (but not
for the Windows platform) and if accessibility was considered at all, and it
seldom was, it was considered grudgingly and as an afterthought.   That has
changed, radically, at the major software makers like Microsoft such that
accessibility considerations are "baked in" as new development occurs.

           You are also absolutely correct that it can feel very
disheartening and like an endless uphill battle, but someone at some point
had to undertake these battles for any given minority that wanted its place
at the proverbial table.   In my career I have worked with individuals with
brain injuries (I was a cognitive rehab therapist for 6 years before I
burned out), visual impairments, and other differences and/or disabilities
and to a person I've been telling them that no one else will be advocating
for them, at least not reliably, in day to day life so one of the best
skills they can develop is to become an effective advocate for themselves.
Effective can, sadly, sometimes be glacially slow, but like water carving a
canyon, it's got to start somewhere.

            And, as you clearly realize, recruiting sighted advocates who
actually do have a clue about accessibility issues never hurts, either.  One
of my roles, when called upon, is to make "sighted friendly" what the issues
regarding accessibility are.  A lot of times that's done by demonstrating
what happens when a screen reader user is trying to access something that
should be incredibly simple (and is, for someone who sees and points and
clicks) but is an absolute nightmare when accessed via a screen reader.

            In the end, though, even I realize that what I'm trying to do is
raise awareness in the broader world to these issues in a way that the
broader world can grasp.  They're never going to come seeking this
information on their own, at least not the vast majority of "the broader
world," anyway.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Re: NVDA and Skype

Pascal Lambert
 

Thank you Sarah for taking the time to reply.  I’ll give it a try.

Blessings

Pascal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sarah k Alawami
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 1:38 AM
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and Skype

 

Windows b is the notification area. I forgot what  I said but I think I said hit windows b, navigate right once, then hit s until you find   speakers, now hit the applications key and hit s for wound. Control tab to communications and choose the do nothing  radio button. I think that’s what I said, I hope?



On Jul 13, 2018, at 3:47 PM, Pascal Lambert <rambeau68@...> wrote:

 

Hi Sarah,

Pardon my ignorance.  What do you mean by “hot Window B”?

When I type “window-B” within Skype it takes me back to the desktop tray.

Please clarify.

Very much appreciated.

Pascal    

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sarah k Alawami
Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2018 1:20 PM
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and Skype

 

Id you check your communications properties? I had that problem until I set it to none.

 

1. Hot windows b

2. Go to speaker and hit the context key

3. Control tab to communications

4. Set the radio button to none and hit ok.

 

Take care




On Jul 12, 2018, at 12:03 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <bglists@...> wrote:

 

Well that is a strange one. Does this mean all sounds are muted all the time?

I used to find it annoying that Skype took control of inputs and outputs every time I ran it and then forgot to put stuff back when you had finished. As I mostly use line level this was really annoying.
I seldom use Skype these days. many people I know tend to use their mobile for Skype now to leave their desktop unpoluted, so to speak!

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Pascal Lambert" <
rambeau68@...>
To: <
nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2018 2:39 AM
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and Skype


Hi All,
I just installed Skype and when I tried to set up the audio, my Jay Lab speakers went silent producing a humming sound.  I am new to using Skype and I would appreciate any suggestion and/or feedback.  Is there a more accessible version of Skype?  Is there a tutorial for using Skype with NVDA?
Many thanks
Blessings
Pascal


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rui Fontes
Sent: Wednesday, July 11, 2018 6:58 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and Focus40 or other Braille displays

In the UserGuide is the link to download the Focus driver from Freedom Scientific pages...

Regards,

Rui Fontes


Às 22:59 de 11/07/2018, Moty Azrad escreveu:


Hi,

Tell your friend that he/she, has to install the correct driver for FOCUS40, after the installation the Focus Braille display can appear in the list of the Braille displays. Then, to choose it and go on.
I've some friends here that work with NVDA and FOCUS40 and it works fine for them.

Good luck

Moti



Moti Azrad
Musician and Piano Tuner
motia@...
motiaz@...
azrad_moty@...
ISRAEL

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Lisa P Geibel
Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2018 00:38
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and Focus40 or other Braille displays

Hi,

I'm sorry if this has been discussed before and I'm rehashing it, but
a friend of mine was curious if NVDA worked with the Focus40? Does it
bring up a list of displays to choose from and how well does it work
with Braille displays if anyone here has this knowledge, I'd really
appreciate info for my friend? Thanks and again, sorry for bringing
this up again.



















 

 


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

Jackie,

          And you are the perfect example of just the kind of pushing that helps to make the world better.   As a sighted person who came to assistive technology for the blind and the visually impaired relatively late in life, I can say that most of the attitude you get is secondary to ignorance, and the fear of revealing same, and because the thought of accessibility never crossed the developer's mind.   I was a developer for many years (but not for the Windows platform) and if accessibility was considered at all, and it seldom was, it was considered grudgingly and as an afterthought.   That has changed, radically, at the major software makers like Microsoft such that accessibility considerations are "baked in" as new development occurs.

           You are also absolutely correct that it can feel very disheartening and like an endless uphill battle, but someone at some point had to undertake these battles for any given minority that wanted its place at the proverbial table.   In my career I have worked with individuals with brain injuries (I was a cognitive rehab therapist for 6 years before I burned out), visual impairments, and other differences and/or disabilities and to a person I've been telling them that no one else will be advocating for them, at least not reliably, in day to day life so one of the best skills they can develop is to become an effective advocate for themselves.  Effective can, sadly, sometimes be glacially slow, but like water carving a canyon, it's got to start somewhere.

            And, as you clearly realize, recruiting sighted advocates who actually do have a clue about accessibility issues never hurts, either.  One of my roles, when called upon, is to make "sighted friendly" what the issues regarding accessibility are.  A lot of times that's done by demonstrating what happens when a screen reader user is trying to access something that should be incredibly simple (and is, for someone who sees and points and clicks) but is an absolute nightmare when accessed via a screen reader.

            In the end, though, even I realize that what I'm trying to do is raise awareness in the broader world to these issues in a way that the broader world can grasp.  They're never going to come seeking this information on their own, at least not the vast majority of "the broader world," anyway.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Devin Prater
 

I can read 95 words per minute, but know some older blind people that can read over 140 words per minute, but they read huge amounts of braille. 

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 1:28 PM Sociohack AC <acsociopath@...> wrote:
I came across this guy on one of the forums, he claimed of having using NVDA at 63% with rate boost turned on. I tried it myself, and it is something like over 1000 wpm. You guys can give it a shot. But, I don't think something like this is even achievable. 
-- 
Regards, 
Sociohack





























--


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Akshaya Choudhary
 

I came across this guy on one of the forums, he claimed of having using NVDA at 63% with rate boost turned on. I tried it myself, and it is something like over 1000 wpm. You guys can give it a shot. But, I don't think something like this is even achievable.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Jackie
 

It's absolutely true, Brian V. I know of a certainty that some of us
have tried to engage w/the authors of security software. The results
have been pretty mixed, to say the least, & that's the very polite,
highly edited version, if you understand me.

What can make translation of commands difficult is when a sighted
person says, "click on the gear icon in the upper left corner of the
screen", for example, rather than identifying it by its text label,
i.e., "settings". It's just hard sometimes for blind folks to know
what all these icons look like, &, of course, they change w/various
iterations of a particular program at times. So, there can indeed be a
gap. The other thing that can make it hard is that many times when
fighting malware, we ask folks to boot into safe mode, which is
obviously somewhat problematic for a person requiring access to
assistive technology. Windows 10 has made some strides in this regard,
& there have been some registry hacks in the past to help w/this, but
clearly it's still a problem for a lot of folks.

1 of the things I was thinking about as regards Bleeping Computer is
their music during downloads. I have contacted them, explaining that
this is a violation of accessibility best practices, but, so far as I
know, the practice still continues. It does really amaze me how few
developers know about accessibility guidelines. I recently engaged the
folks who develop a particular WordPress plugin because their software
had become inaccessible when they upgraded versions. The responses I
received were pretty disconcerting, i.e., they said they would
"redraw" the checkbox to make it look like the classic 1, & then they
told me I was just missing features of the previous version because of
plugin conflicts. Uh, well, no. They finally got it right, but only
after I told them that I would really prefer they not reply to me
again, & indeed would find doing so disrespectful, until they read
some WCAG 2.0 materials, for which I provided links. (Yes, I'm aware
of 2.1, but those considerations weren't relevant here). So, it can be
pretty disheartening & an uphill battle, Brian V. 1 thing I think that
really helped when engaging the developers of that particular security
plugin was when a sighted guy jumped in & informed them it was an
accessibility nightmare. So I personally appreciate folks like you &
him who are in the arena helping us.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 12:03 PM, Jackie wrote:


Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of &
attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.
Hardly a shock, really.   The entirety of individuals with disabilities that
need special access to use computers is the proverbial drop in an ocean.
You are not the target demographic of any general purpose computer support
forum.

That being said, it's not the responsibility of random volunteers out there
in cyberspace to presume someone asking a question requires any sort of
consideration for assistive technology, regardless of the type, unless they
identify themselves as such.   Even then, a lot of the questions aren't
directly related to issues of access to begin with.  I expect, and have
every reason to expect, individuals who are blind to be able to "translate
into screen-reader commands" things that are given in point-and-click
nomenclature.  I have to translate in the opposite direction, and it's far
from difficult.

If your question has something to do with accessibility on a general forum
it's not likely to get an answer simply because the number of blind users
who go outside groups such as this one are incredibly small.   Any minority
has to engage the broader world, as the broader world is not going to seek
you out.  'Twas ever thus.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have eloquence set to 65 percent 112 words a minute

it took me a couple of years to get my brain trained to under stand the speech that fast but that is what I have mine set at


On 7/14/2018 2:22 AM, Sociohack AC wrote:
Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers on/

Regards

-- 
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


NVDA focus problem.

John Isige
 

Hi all. I've noticed this for a couple of versions of both NVDA and Windows 10. When I switch windows with alt-tab, it seems like NVDA doesn't get full focus. For example, suppose I'm listening to a track, so I have two windows open, a Windows Explorer window with files, and Foobar 2000, or Winamp, or whatever media player I'm using. I want to alt-tab, let's say to turn repeat on or off or to see how much time remains in the file.


If I do that, it seems like the commands work, but NVDA doesn't read the window. For instance, right now if I play a song and alt-tab to Winamp's window, i can hit keys and they work, e.g. 'v' to stop, 'x' to play. But if I read the window title with NVDA-t, it says "explorer". The title is read correctly with alt-tab, but when I release alt-tab, I seem to be both in the window, and not in the window, as it were. The commands for the program work, but NVDA things, e.g. hitting ctrl-shift-r in Winamp or Foobar to get the remaining time, don't.


Is there a way to fix this? A different screen resolution or something? In theory mine's set to 1024/768, unless Windows changed it after an update. BTW this gets fixed if I alt-tab back to another window, release alt-tab until that window comes up, and then alt-tab back to the other window, Foobar or whatever. When I do that it reads like it should and NVDA commands work and all. That's nothing earth-shattering of course, but it is fairly annoying, since it happens on a regular basis.


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 12:03 PM, Jackie wrote:
Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of & attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.
Hardly a shock, really.   The entirety of individuals with disabilities that need special access to use computers is the proverbial drop in an ocean.  You are not the target demographic of any general purpose computer support forum.

That being said, it's not the responsibility of random volunteers out there in cyberspace to presume someone asking a question requires any sort of consideration for assistive technology, regardless of the type, unless they identify themselves as such.   Even then, a lot of the questions aren't directly related to issues of access to begin with.  I expect, and have every reason to expect, individuals who are blind to be able to "translate into screen-reader commands" things that are given in point-and-click nomenclature.  I have to translate in the opposite direction, and it's far from difficult.

If your question has something to do with accessibility on a general forum it's not likely to get an answer simply because the number of blind users who go outside groups such as this one are incredibly small.   Any minority has to engage the broader world, as the broader world is not going to seek you out.  'Twas ever thus.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Rob Hudson
 

Cristbal <cristobalmuli@gmail.com> wrote:
That's impressive. Lemme guess, you were an early adopter of Braille?
I was born pretty much blind, and I learned braille while the baby sighties were struggling to make periods with little pencils, yes. Having learned braille so early, it was all I knew and therefore I had nothing to unlearn.


NVDA Technical Support: part 2 posted, things to do for part 3 on july 21st

 

Hi all,

 

The second part of NVDA Technical Support: An Introduction webinar is now up:

https://www.josephsl.net/files/NVDATechSupportWebinar2.mp3

 

If you are curious about how the log file works or wanting to know how to understand log entries, this is the part you don’t want to skip.

 

Also, the third and final webinar in this series will take place on July 21, 2018 at 11 AM Pacific (18:00 UTC). We’ll go over recognizing and troubleshooting common NVDA problems. The location is the same: josephsl.net TeamTalk server.

 

Until then, help at least two people on various channels (users list, Twitter, Facebook, etc.), with at least one of them involving reading and understanding NVDA log. While doing that, come up with at least three problems you or users may encounter as they use NVDA.

 

Lastly, if there is sufficient demand, I’ll host a webinar in fall 2018 (around the time NVDA 2018.3 is being finalized) on how to use Remote Support add-on for its intended purpose: technical support, including attitudes, procedures, and activities people should NOT do with this add-on.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Cristóbal
 

That's impressive. Lemme guess, you were an early adopter of Braille? I
can't recall many instances of someone who learned Braille beyond a really
early age where they could read out loud at the rate and fluidity of a
sighted person with print. At least not for an extended period of time.
I’m sure there have to be exceptions to the rule as with most things, but
I'll bet it's pretty rare.
I just wish NVDA would get better at Braille support. With my Brailliant BI
40, can't really make use of the command keys.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rob Hudson
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 8:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Cristóbal <cristobalmuli@gmail.com> wrote:
I cant’ even imagine trying to read a book or anything really for an
extended period of time in Braille. Much less at a rate of speed that would
make it even remotely close to synthesizer reading and comprehension.

I am a competent enough braille reader that I gave some thought to working
for a company narrating things on tape, or mp3, or whatever they do
nowadays. When I was in school, I got called on to read aloud in English
class more than almost anyone else there.
The only problem I see is that if i'm reading books in audible format, the
clicking of the braille display will be heard. I guess a noise gate could
filter that out, but that adds more processing time, which adds more
expense, which brings the cost to benefit ratio of hiring me too out of
balance. Another dream down the tubes.


Re: I think Avast is a virus :-)

Jackie
 

Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of
& attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
I will believe that CCleaner installs Avast after the fact and on its own
the first time I encounter it, and not before.

I've got 5 machines in my household, and on 4 of them CCleaner is
assiduously kept up to date.   I have not yet had it do anything unexpected
and there is no business that would be insane enough to risk alienating a
massive user base, and creating a PR nightmare, by "deciding for you" after
an installation that something else entirely needs to be installed.

I haven't had a bit of trouble with Google Backup & Sync, either.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Sarah k Alawami
 

I’m at 80 wpm. I used to be at 100 I can listen though at about 350 to 400 wpm, or even faster. Just practice practice practice is all I can say.

On Jul 14, 2018, at 8:09 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I've seen Braille readers read at speeds I estimate to be perhaps 250 or 300 words per minute.  Most Braille readers I've observed have been much slower, tending, by my rough guess, to read at around 180 or 170 words per minute.  These are my observations of about fifteen or twenty Braille readers, many of them, reading Braille since grammar school.  It is not a proper sample but to me, it is suggestive.
 
Are there techniques that slower Braille readers can use to significantly increase their speed?  I don't know,  Did some of these people learn to read Braille in different ways in terms of technique?  I don't know.  but that appears to me to be suggestive of the situation as it stands.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:12 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


-- but, doesn't Braille slows you down further? 
Speed is my main conceen.  
Regards,
Sociohack


Re: Urgently need help! (about edit form in Word2010 with NVDA)

Jackie
 

Hello. Your English is far better than I can speak whatever your
native language is. Don't worry about it, please. As long as we can
understand each other, we're good. What's your name?

As to your problem, I rather suspect that your form is in protected
mode. You should save it in order to disable that. I recommend saving
it to a different name than the original, so you'll always have that 1
as a backup in case the form you're working with somehow gets messed
up (it happens). Also, when you do save it, the computer will want to
save it to a temporary folder. Browse to your documents folder or
another of your choosing & save it there instead.

Then you can use the tab & shift-tab key to fill in the fields.

Please let me know if my instructions are clear &/or if they help.
Good luck & much success on your thesis.

On 7/14/18, prem.translator@gmail.com <prem.translator@gmail.com> wrote:
I recieved a form which is the templet for my Thesis. However, when I open
the document I pressed enter and type down some information, it seems that
the information didn't appear in the edit box, but before it. Moreover, it
appeared one line for each information instead of in the same line like in
the form.
e.g.
There are three edit boxes in the same line, Title, firstname and surname,
but the information I put is not in the box and separated to be one
information for each line.

How can I deal with it?
Please help me and really sorry for my English.



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Urgently need help! (about edit form in Word2010 with NVDA)

prem.translator@...
 

I recieved a form which is the templet for my Thesis. However, when I open the document I pressed enter and type down some information, it seems that the information didn't appear in the edit box, but before it. Moreover, it appeared one line for each information instead of in the same line like in the form.
e.g.
There are three edit boxes in the same line, Title, firstname and surname, but the information I put is not in the box and separated to be one information for each line.

How can I deal with it?
Please help me and really sorry for my English.