Date   

Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

 

Actually, in digging around to see if I could find something about trash management I discovered that the 15 GB limit applies across all Google storage.  For anyone logged in to a Google Account they can go to:
                      https://one.google.com/u/0/storage?hl=en
to see how much storage their using and in which Google services.  I have a lot less storage used than I had presumed for my primary account, just a bit over 2GB.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

The terrible state of public education has paid huge dividends in ignorance.  Huge.  We now have a country that can be told blatant lies — easily checkable, blatant lies — and I’m not talking about the covert workings of the CIA. When we have a terrorist attack, on September 11, 2001 with 19 men — 15 of them are Saudis — and five minutes later the whole country thinks they’re from Iraq — how can you have faith in the public? This is an easily checkable fact. The whole country is like the O.J. Simpson jurors.

      ~ Fran Lebowitz in Ruminator Magazine interview with Susannah McNeely (Aug/Sept 2005)

 

 


Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

 

Gene,

           Whether access is POP or IMAP, insofar as how Gmail handles Trash, is irrelevant.  You are correct that when you delete a message it gets moved to Trash (which is the rough equivalent of the Windows recycle bin, since you can restore from it) and if it remains there for more than 30 days it is permanently deleted.

            As far as I know there is no storage limit on Gmail.  Now, on Google Drive if you use the free version you get 15GB of storage, but that's not true of Gmail.  One of its early marketing claims was that "you'd never have to delete an e-mail message".  On my oldest account I have over 9K messages, all read, and many of which should be deleted, but with no sign of any limit indicated, ever.  A great many of those have attachments, too.

            Also, the same account can be set up for both POP and IMAP access, so heaven knows how Google handles that if someone does it behind the scenes.  My original Gmail account, which was created in 2008, has POP enabled for all messages (even those downloaded before) from September 2008.  I have never used POP access, though, since IMAP is enabled as well and when I have used e-mail clients I have always used IMAP access since I want everything to be kept in sync regardless of how or where it's accessed.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

The terrible state of public education has paid huge dividends in ignorance.  Huge.  We now have a country that can be told blatant lies — easily checkable, blatant lies — and I’m not talking about the covert workings of the CIA. When we have a terrorist attack, on September 11, 2001 with 19 men — 15 of them are Saudis — and five minutes later the whole country thinks they’re from Iraq — how can you have faith in the public? This is an easily checkable fact. The whole country is like the O.J. Simpson jurors.

      ~ Fran Lebowitz in Ruminator Magazine interview with Susannah McNeely (Aug/Sept 2005)

 

 


Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Gene
 

Here is something interesting that should be discussed.  I just looked at my GMail account on the web site.  I usually use Windows Live Mail.  I found that when I delete a message, it automatically goes to the trash folder on the GMail site.  Since trash is automatically deleted when a message is thirty days old, I have used almost none of my storage space.  I'm using a POP3 account.  I don't know what GMail does when someone is using an IMAP account but that is what is occuring with my POP3 account. 
 
I'd like to know what is happening with other people. 

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 8:31 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

I didn't keep Hope's messages so the originals won't be below this message.
 
I thought I read, and maybe I did read somewhere, that if the GMail inbox is full, it will automatically delete old mail and replace it with new mail.  But this appears not to be true, based on what I read after seeing your messages.
 
However, I don't know why your trash isn't being emptied.  I've seen in enough reputable places, that GMail deletes trash after a message is 30 days old enough that I think it is true. 
 
Gene


Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Gene
 

I didn't keep Hope's messages so the originals won't be below this message.
 
I thought I read, and maybe I did read somewhere, that if the GMail inbox is full, it will automatically delete old mail and replace it with new mail.  But this appears not to be true, based on what I read after seeing your messages.
 
However, I don't know why your trash isn't being emptied.  I've seen in enough reputable places, that GMail deletes trash after a message is 30 days old enough that I think it is true. 
 
Gene


Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Sarah k Alawami
 

Actualy as I said before you will run out of space as gmail does not delete stuff in the all mail folder, it really does keep them there and as for trash I've not seen it remove stuff now since may 29th. Anyway here is the info for doingn what I do.

Enter your filter criteria in the pop-up window -- for example, a sender's email address, a specific subject or a keyword. To find all emails, enter "*" in the "From" field. Enter "before:2013/09/30" in the "Has the Words" field and use the current date -- or any date, but make sure to use the format YYYY/MM/DD -- to filter all past emails.

On 9 Nov 2018, at 6:21, Gene wrote:

All that work, manually deleting all unwanted messages.  Are they anything you don't want on the site in case of some sort of hack?  Unless they contain confidential or personal information you don't want anyone to see, in which case the information shouldn't be sent in an unencrypted message in the first place since e-mail isn't private unless encrypted, why bother deleting messages?  As I explained earlier, you will never run out of room.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 8:12 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

As far as I am aware of there is no way to delete all your emails at
one go in gmail. You have to check them one by one and then click on
the delete button.
I clear those emails I do not need daily.
Nevzat

On 11/9/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
> On Fri, Nov 9, 2018 at 03:14 AM, Heaven Botma wrote:
>
>>
>> If you have a Gmail account with thousands of e-mails, is there a way to
>> clean the account at once?
>
> * Mass Selection and Deletion of Gmail Messages via the Gmail Web Interface
> (
> https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=0B98uELZbPFnOWXVWcmJFM2pwdjQ
> )
>
>
> --
>
> Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763
>
> *The terrible state of public education has paid huge dividends in
> ignorance.  Huge.  We now have a country that can be told blatant lies —
> easily checkable, blatant lies — and I’m not talking about the covert
> workings of the CIA. When we have a terrorist attack, on September 11, 2001
> with 19 men — 15 of them are Saudis — and five minutes later the whole
> country thinks they’re from Iraq — how can you have faith in the public?
> This is an easily checkable fact. The whole country is like the O.J. Simpson
> jurors.*
>
>       ~ Fran Lebowitz in Ruminator Magazine interview with Susannah McNeely
> (Aug/Sept 2005)
>
>
>
>



Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Sarah k Alawami
 

Actually in my case when I clered everything before 2016 it cleared I kid you not 20 gigs of stuff. It took all night and used up all of my api calls so I could not really sync everything for about 24 hours but it worked well.

On 9 Nov 2018, at 3:55, Gene wrote:

The trash folder automatically deletes mail that is thirty days old.  It appears the accumulated mail is somewhere else, such as in the inbox.  It may be that someone wants to remove everything for some reason.  But you don't have to worry about running out of room.  If you run out of room, the oldest messages are deleted and replaced by newer ones.  So if that is the only reason you want to remove old mail, there is no need to do so.
 
I don't use GMail for personal mail that I want to keep private so I don't care about whether it accumulates.  It is all list mail, in my case.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 5:31 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

What happens if you use Imap, does deleting the whole lot then doing a purge
remove them from webmail as well?
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "mcLeod stinnett" <macks75205@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 10:45 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL




--
from mack  the only way I know is to switch your account to standard. go to
the trash folder and you can select up to 50 at a time.






Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Sarah k Alawami
 

I have a filter that I made that would clean e gmails before. a certain year so everything before 2016 in my case disappeared. I have instructions somewhere I'll have to find.

On 9 Nov 2018, at 2:45, mcLeod stinnett wrote:

-- from mack the only way I know is to switch your account to standard. go to the trash folder and you can select up to 50 at a time.


Re: Trying to add a shortkey to gestures.ini

Anne Günther
 

Hi,
Hmm, I got the "howto" mail for this from the german nvda list. My colleague also used this method and it works for her. From what I understand it's basically a way of hacking the input method dialogue from the options menu.
But thanks for your answer anyway. :-)
Guenni


Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Jonathan COHN
 

Hello,

 

In google standard view, if you are in the message list, and click shift tab several times you should hear “select”. If you click enter on this, it brings up a menu to select all or select unread.

 

I then was able to tab forward and find a focusable item called select all XXX messages.

 

Generally, when on the web I use Google’s INBOX application that has a button next to each category to erase and/or “mark complete” all items in that category.

 

Jonathan

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Heaven Botma
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 3:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL
Importance: Low

 

Dear List

 

If you have a Gmail account with thousands of e-mails, is there a way to clean the account at once?

 

Kind regards

 

Heaven


Re: Learning coding with NVDA

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes I came into it a bit too late. I learned on old z80 machines and of course basic. However the satisfaction of writing a functional database for a specific task not catered for taught me a heck of a lot about how people use, or misuse computers and in fact that one thing has made me want to help people who are scared of computers to appreciate that they are after all just tools, and no matter how you dress them up, with clever voice interactions or old fashioned keyboards, you have an expectation and everyone has their own way, so finding a system which can be configured to work as the person thinks is quite an art, one that in the main I think NVDA gets right. I do have gripes, as many do, but they are few nowadays. One thing learning a bit about computer programming did teach me is that the concept of making things act in a way people expect them to when all that is going on is manipulating numbers at the basic level is really an amazing conceptual experience.
No I'm no programmer these days, I used to have sight and find the frustrations of syntax and all of that now beyond me.

I have to thank Clive Sinclair whose computers I learned on. I even built one from a kit.

Many people these days never had that chance.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 4:15 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Learning coding with NVDA


Hi Jo,
Ultimately, it depends on:
1. Inspiration and motivation: for the most part, people start out doing anything (including programming) because they are inspired by or something motivates them. In my case, I got interested in programming when I was a teenager thanks to my experiences using assistive technologies at school. This is partly the reason for contributing code to NVDA today; the other reason for me contributing code is because of lives of users - people have different reasons for using NVDA and other screen readers, and one major motivation for continuing my NVDA work (even though I'm a college student busy with competitive speaking competitions) is how users will end up utilizing what I write, including in unexpected situations.
2. Goals: people who started out learning to program at an early age may find themselves doing something else later in life, and vice versa. Ultimately, it isn't just the process of learning how to code on your computer that'll 100 percent determine your satisfaction with what you do - it is the ultimate end goal you have in mind. Among many reasons to go into programming as a teenager, I hope you find a worthwhile goal (I'm intentionally saying it like this because there are those who went into programming for bad reasons).
3. Values and processes: I think programming is, after all, writing. I think people starting out programming may not realize the fact that what they're essentially doing is becoming a playwright, except the actors are silicon chips, wires, and increasingly, wireless radios and things taught to think smart. As a "digital dramatist", you're essentially going to learn how to pour out your heart, beliefs, and values in code. NVDA source code is a good example of this, with different "writers" working together to formulate a story.
4. A bit of math: I once heard that, of all engineering disciplines, computer science (which includes programming as a subfield) is closest to mathematics. Programming began as a small subfield of mathematics centuries ago, and computing and math are still intertwined (for example, artificial intelligence benefits from research in mathematics and vice versa). In the beginning stages of learning programming, you won't get into math a lot, but as you progress and learn more about logic, debugging and more advanced concepts, you'll see why colleges and universities ask potential programmers to prove that they can do something with math (and to debunk a popular belief, there are blind people who are successful in mathematics and programming, and I still think about calculus from time to time). There are exceptions out there: there are successful programmers who had little knowledge about math when they first began.

Rather than telling you which programming languages to learn and from whom, I'd like to challenge you by asking you to think critically about the following statements:
1. I think programming is fun because I watch people do it on the Internet or TV.
2. I think I can learn to code because I watch people do it on the internet or TV.
3. I think I can explain what I'm doing to people who don't know what I'm doing.
4. I think I can learn to explain what I'm doing to people who don't know me and don't know what I'm doing.
5. I think Alexa is the greatest invention in world history.
6. I think Alexa is not the greatest invention in world history.
7. I think I can listen to private conversations if I learn how to code.
8. I think I can stop myself from listening to private conversations if I learn how to code.
9. I think I can serve people through my programming skills.
10. I think I can learn to serve people through my programming skills.
11. I believe global problems can be solved by computers.
12. I believe computers can't solve global problems.
13. Computers can solve all kinds of life issues.
14. Computers can't solve all kinds of life issues.

Some of these statements should give you chills, because programming comes with ethical responsibilities. More than anything, I think the most important thing you'll learn when you do decide to learn programming isn't the number of programming languages you can learn or extent of NVDA code contributions, but thinking about your actions and consequences (computers are smart, but only because those who do write code behind such systems literally told chips to act this way).

Hope this helps.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jo Fullerton
Sent: Friday, November 9, 2018 4:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Cc: Jo Fullerton <Jo.Fullerton@rnib.org.uk>
Subject: [nvda] Learning coding with NVDA

Sending again with relevant subject line.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jo Fullerton
Sent: 09 November 2018 12:47
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Cc: Jo Fullerton <Jo.Fullerton@rnib.org.uk>
Subject: RE: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

Does anyone have any advice for a teenager in Scotland who wants to learn coding using NVDA? Is there a list of programming languages that work well with NVDA?

You could reply to me directly - jo.fullerton@rnib.org.uk

Thanks

Jo Fullerton


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris via Groups.Io
Sent: 09 November 2018 12:38
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

Its probably a in browser notification of some sort

As to what it relates to I cant possibly speculate on that sorry





From: Felix G. <mailto:constantlyvariable@gmail.com>
Sent: 09 November 2018 12:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome



Hello everyone,

when working with Chrome and NVDA I often hear the word "alert" by

itself, that is, without any hint as to what the alert is about and

how to react to it. Can anyone relate to this and offer a

non-speculative explanation?

Thanks in advance and have a nice weekend,

Felix










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Re: Trying to add a shortkey to gestures.ini

Jonathan COHN
 

I did not see a reply for this on list, so I am attempting to answer, even though I have not tried working with this file.

It appears to me that both the right side and left side of your settings are gestures, and I expect that one side should be a script name.

HTH,

Jonathan

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Anne Günther
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2018 12:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Trying to add a shortkey to gestures.ini
Importance: Low

Hi,
for my job I need to be able to jump to the end of a continously changing text via braille display. I put the following line at the end of the "gestures.ini" file, but it doesn't do anything.

kb:control+end ="br(handyTech.activeStar):b7"

What am I doing wrong? :-)


Re: The word "alert" in Google Chrome

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Sometimes odd things happen in browsers. One that often is irritating is void zero, being spoken for no apparent reason, though it is there in the text, why is it there?
When you hear alert do you actually find it is actually a word or does some function of nvda, such as a tooltip or balloon etc occur that nvda is simply reporting to you.
The world has too many lerts!
Kill A Lert today!
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris via Groups.Io" <chrismedley=btinternet.com@groups.io>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 12:37 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome


Its probably a in browser notification of some sort
As to what it relates to I cant possibly speculate on that sorry


From: Felix G.
Sent: 09 November 2018 12:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

Hello everyone,
when working with Chrome and NVDA I often hear the word "alert" by
itself, that is, without any hint as to what the alert is about and
how to react to it. Can anyone relate to this and offer a
non-speculative explanation?
Thanks in advance and have a nice weekend,
Felix


Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I was more interested in whether deleting in imap, will delete from webmail regardless of what is in it so to speak. I notice that on my virgin account it seems to me that webmail imap and pop3 all have separate locations and lists which makes fully deleting things a little time consuming.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 11:55 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL


The trash folder automatically deletes mail that is thirty days old. It appears the accumulated mail is somewhere else, such as in the inbox. It may be that someone wants to remove everything for some reason. But you don't have to worry about running out of room. If you run out of room, the oldest messages are deleted and replaced by newer ones. So if that is the only reason you want to remove old mail, there is no need to do so.

I don't use GMail for personal mail that I want to keep private so I don't care about whether it accumulates. It is all list mail, in my case.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 5:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL


What happens if you use Imap, does deleting the whole lot then doing a purge
remove them from webmail as well?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "mcLeod stinnett" <macks75205@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 09, 2018 10:45 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL




--
from mack the only way I know is to switch your account to standard. go to
the trash folder and you can select up to 50 at a time.


Re: Learning coding with NVDA

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

In general, it's not the learning of the language that's an issue when using NVDA, it's finding tools that work tow rite/compile/debug your code that is the problem.  I almost always use a standard text editor when writing code, even if there is an IDE for any particular language, mostly because their IDE looks good for sighted folks, but stinks for screen reader users, so I simply ignore any IDE offerings, and write my code in an editor of my choice, then call the command line compilers to reduce my code to something recognizable by the computer.  Sometimes, this isn't possible, such as when there's frameworks (as in OSX), or special compiler configurations required (as when using visual C from microsoft), but in general, using a text editor and calling the external command line editors on my code is how I program, and it's worked for me for about 30 years, so I'm sticking with it.
You can learn any language you like, but that's only half the battle, you still need to learn to use the tools required to turn that language into something the computer understands, and that's a whole 'nother learning curve.


Re: Learning coding with NVDA

David Moore
 

Thanks, Joseph!

It was great to hear your testimony about your journey through coding and programming.

David Moore

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Friday, November 9, 2018 11:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Learning coding with NVDA

 

Hi Jo,

Ultimately, it depends on:

1. Inspiration and motivation: for the most part, people start out doing anything (including programming) because they are inspired by or something motivates them. In my case, I got interested in programming when I was a teenager thanks to my experiences using assistive technologies at school. This is partly the reason for contributing code to NVDA today; the other reason for me contributing code is because of lives of users - people have different reasons for using NVDA and other screen readers, and one major motivation for continuing my NVDA work (even though I'm a college student busy with competitive speaking competitions) is how users will end up utilizing what I write, including in unexpected situations.

2. Goals: people who started out learning to program at an early age may find themselves doing something else later in life, and vice versa. Ultimately, it isn't just the process of learning how to code on your computer that'll 100 percent determine your satisfaction with what you do - it is the ultimate end goal you have in mind. Among many reasons to go into programming as a teenager, I hope you find a worthwhile goal (I'm intentionally saying it like this because there are those who went into programming for bad reasons).

3. Values and processes: I think programming is, after all, writing. I think people starting out programming may not realize the fact that what they're essentially doing is becoming a playwright, except the actors are silicon chips, wires, and increasingly, wireless radios and things taught to think smart. As a "digital dramatist", you're essentially going to learn how to pour out your heart, beliefs, and values in code. NVDA source code is a good example of this, with different "writers" working together to formulate a story.

4. A bit of math: I once heard that, of all engineering disciplines, computer science (which includes programming as a subfield) is closest to mathematics. Programming began as a small subfield of mathematics centuries ago, and computing and math are still intertwined (for example, artificial intelligence benefits from research in mathematics and vice versa). In the beginning stages of learning programming, you won't get into math a lot, but as you progress and learn more about logic, debugging and more advanced concepts, you'll see why colleges and universities ask potential programmers to prove that they can do something with math (and to debunk a popular belief, there are blind people who are successful in mathematics and programming, and I still think about calculus from time to time). There are exceptions out there: there are successful programmers who had little knowledge about math when they first began.

 

Rather than telling you which programming languages to learn and from whom, I'd like to challenge you by asking you to think critically about the following statements:

1. I think programming is fun because I watch people do it on the Internet or TV.

2. I think I can learn to code because I watch people do it on the internet or TV.

3. I think I can explain what I'm doing to people who don't know what I'm doing.

4. I think I can learn to explain what I'm doing to people who don't know me and don't know what I'm doing.

5. I think Alexa is the greatest invention in world history.

6. I think Alexa is not the greatest invention in world history.

7. I think I can listen to private conversations if I learn how to code.

8. I think I can stop myself from listening to private conversations if I learn how to code.

9. I think I can serve people through my programming skills.

10. I think I can learn to serve people through my programming skills.

11. I believe global problems can be solved by computers.

12. I believe computers can't solve global problems.

13. Computers can solve all kinds of life issues.

14. Computers can't solve all kinds of life issues.

 

Some of these statements should give you chills, because programming comes with ethical responsibilities. More than anything, I think the most important thing you'll learn when you do decide to learn programming isn't the number of programming languages you can learn or extent of NVDA code contributions, but thinking about your actions and consequences (computers are smart, but only because those who do write code behind such systems literally told chips to act this way).

 

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jo Fullerton

Sent: Friday, November 9, 2018 4:49 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Cc: Jo Fullerton <Jo.Fullerton@...>

Subject: [nvda] Learning coding with NVDA

 

Sending again with relevant subject line.

 

-----Original Message-----

From: Jo Fullerton

Sent: 09 November 2018 12:47

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Cc: Jo Fullerton <Jo.Fullerton@...>

Subject: RE: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

 

Does anyone have any advice for a teenager in Scotland who wants to learn coding using NVDA?  Is there a list of programming languages that work well with NVDA?

 

You could reply to me directly - jo.fullerton@...

 

Thanks

 

Jo Fullerton

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris via Groups.Io

Sent: 09 November 2018 12:38

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

 

Its probably a in browser notification of some sort

 

As to what it relates to I cant possibly speculate on that sorry

 

 

 

From: Felix G. <mailto:constantlyvariable@...>

Sent: 09 November 2018 12:31

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Subject: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

 

 

Hello everyone,

 

when working with Chrome and NVDA I often hear the word "alert" by

 

itself, that is, without any hint as to what the alert is about and

 

how to react to it. Can anyone relate to this and offer a

 

non-speculative explanation?

 

Thanks in advance and have a nice weekend,

 

Felix

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

--

 

Celebrating 150 years of creating change for blind and partially sighted people.

To help us continue removing the barriers that can stop people with sight loss thriving, visit www.rnib.org.uk to donate.

 

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Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

 

Heaven,

            Just a word of warning about trying to do mass deletes via an e-mail client:  They will often bog down and go into "Not Responding" mode under Windows when there are thousands upon thousands of messages to deal with.   I have recently been assisting several clients with e-mail client changes, both to Outlook and to Thunderbird, and both "get cranky" when the scope of messages selected is really, really large.

             If you want to do a big time purge I strongly suggest using Gmail's webmail interface and the instructions I posted earlier.  Even using that method you can sometimes see Gmail take a bit of time before coming back after the Delete is triggered, but it doesn't result in a hung program.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

The terrible state of public education has paid huge dividends in ignorance.  Huge.  We now have a country that can be told blatant lies — easily checkable, blatant lies — and I’m not talking about the covert workings of the CIA. When we have a terrorist attack, on September 11, 2001 with 19 men — 15 of them are Saudis — and five minutes later the whole country thinks they’re from Iraq — how can you have faith in the public? This is an easily checkable fact. The whole country is like the O.J. Simpson jurors.

      ~ Fran Lebowitz in Ruminator Magazine interview with Susannah McNeely (Aug/Sept 2005)

 

 


Re: NVDA and Bitcoin

Hope Williamson <isepic@...>
 

You're very welcome.


Re: Learning coding with NVDA

 

Hi Jo,
Ultimately, it depends on:
1. Inspiration and motivation: for the most part, people start out doing anything (including programming) because they are inspired by or something motivates them. In my case, I got interested in programming when I was a teenager thanks to my experiences using assistive technologies at school. This is partly the reason for contributing code to NVDA today; the other reason for me contributing code is because of lives of users - people have different reasons for using NVDA and other screen readers, and one major motivation for continuing my NVDA work (even though I'm a college student busy with competitive speaking competitions) is how users will end up utilizing what I write, including in unexpected situations.
2. Goals: people who started out learning to program at an early age may find themselves doing something else later in life, and vice versa. Ultimately, it isn't just the process of learning how to code on your computer that'll 100 percent determine your satisfaction with what you do - it is the ultimate end goal you have in mind. Among many reasons to go into programming as a teenager, I hope you find a worthwhile goal (I'm intentionally saying it like this because there are those who went into programming for bad reasons).
3. Values and processes: I think programming is, after all, writing. I think people starting out programming may not realize the fact that what they're essentially doing is becoming a playwright, except the actors are silicon chips, wires, and increasingly, wireless radios and things taught to think smart. As a "digital dramatist", you're essentially going to learn how to pour out your heart, beliefs, and values in code. NVDA source code is a good example of this, with different "writers" working together to formulate a story.
4. A bit of math: I once heard that, of all engineering disciplines, computer science (which includes programming as a subfield) is closest to mathematics. Programming began as a small subfield of mathematics centuries ago, and computing and math are still intertwined (for example, artificial intelligence benefits from research in mathematics and vice versa). In the beginning stages of learning programming, you won't get into math a lot, but as you progress and learn more about logic, debugging and more advanced concepts, you'll see why colleges and universities ask potential programmers to prove that they can do something with math (and to debunk a popular belief, there are blind people who are successful in mathematics and programming, and I still think about calculus from time to time). There are exceptions out there: there are successful programmers who had little knowledge about math when they first began.

Rather than telling you which programming languages to learn and from whom, I'd like to challenge you by asking you to think critically about the following statements:
1. I think programming is fun because I watch people do it on the Internet or TV.
2. I think I can learn to code because I watch people do it on the internet or TV.
3. I think I can explain what I'm doing to people who don't know what I'm doing.
4. I think I can learn to explain what I'm doing to people who don't know me and don't know what I'm doing.
5. I think Alexa is the greatest invention in world history.
6. I think Alexa is not the greatest invention in world history.
7. I think I can listen to private conversations if I learn how to code.
8. I think I can stop myself from listening to private conversations if I learn how to code.
9. I think I can serve people through my programming skills.
10. I think I can learn to serve people through my programming skills.
11. I believe global problems can be solved by computers.
12. I believe computers can't solve global problems.
13. Computers can solve all kinds of life issues.
14. Computers can't solve all kinds of life issues.

Some of these statements should give you chills, because programming comes with ethical responsibilities. More than anything, I think the most important thing you'll learn when you do decide to learn programming isn't the number of programming languages you can learn or extent of NVDA code contributions, but thinking about your actions and consequences (computers are smart, but only because those who do write code behind such systems literally told chips to act this way).

Hope this helps.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jo Fullerton
Sent: Friday, November 9, 2018 4:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Cc: Jo Fullerton <Jo.Fullerton@rnib.org.uk>
Subject: [nvda] Learning coding with NVDA

Sending again with relevant subject line.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jo Fullerton
Sent: 09 November 2018 12:47
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Cc: Jo Fullerton <Jo.Fullerton@rnib.org.uk>
Subject: RE: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

Does anyone have any advice for a teenager in Scotland who wants to learn coding using NVDA? Is there a list of programming languages that work well with NVDA?

You could reply to me directly - jo.fullerton@rnib.org.uk

Thanks

Jo Fullerton


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris via Groups.Io
Sent: 09 November 2018 12:38
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome

Its probably a in browser notification of some sort

As to what it relates to I cant possibly speculate on that sorry





From: Felix G. <mailto:constantlyvariable@gmail.com>
Sent: 09 November 2018 12:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] The word "alert" in Google Chrome



Hello everyone,

when working with Chrome and NVDA I often hear the word "alert" by

itself, that is, without any hint as to what the alert is about and

how to react to it. Can anyone relate to this and offer a

non-speculative explanation?

Thanks in advance and have a nice weekend,

Felix










--

Celebrating 150 years of creating change for blind and partially sighted people.
To help us continue removing the barriers that can stop people with sight loss thriving, visit www.rnib.org.uk to donate.

--


DISCLAIMER:

NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any attachments is confidential and may be privileged. If you are not the intended recipient you should not use, disclose, distribute or copy any of the content of it or of any attachment; you are requested to notify the sender immediately of your receipt of the email and then to delete it and any attachments from your system.

RNIB endeavours to ensure that emails and any attachments generated by its staff are free from viruses or other contaminants. However, it cannot accept any responsibility for any such which are transmitted.

We therefore recommend you scan all attachments.

Please note that the statements and views expressed in this email and any attachments are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RNIB.

RNIB Registered Charity Number: 226227

Website: https://www.rnib.org.uk


Re: Basic html for gmail

 

I have already missed Firefox so I returned to it, this time
bookmarking the basic html view.
Nevzat

On 11/9/18, Nevzat Adil <nevzatadil@gmail.com> wrote:
I did that, but standard view keep loading. So I changed my broser
fromm Firefox to Google Crome.
Nevzat

On 11/9/18, Ann Byrne <annakb@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
You need to find the 'save settings' or 'save changes' button to make
the changes stick.

At 07:37 AM 11/9/2018, you wrote:
Robert, I tried the link you gave and I was able to directly go to
basic html, but when I returned it still loaded standard view and I
was able to go to focus mode and find the basic html view button doing
shift+tab. Clicking on that button it took me back to basic html. When
I returned again standard view
was loaded.

I followed Heaven's suggestions and changed browser, but since I do
not have IE on my computer I set Google Crome as my default and it
went directly to basic html.
Changing browser did the trick.

I did not like leaving Firefox, but as I use gmail quite often I did
not want to go through extra steps every time for basic html.

Thank you all for your valuable suggestions.
Nevzat

On 11/9/18, Robert Kingett <kingettr@gmail.com> wrote:
[Edited Message Follows]
[Reason: I added the link as markdown link to my previous message.]

Here's how to make NVDA read the basic HTML button. The link in post 2
will
set basic HTML as default view but if standard still loads, follow
these
steps. The below link will do it automatically.

[Set basic HTML as the
default.](https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=html&zy=h)

1. Open gmail.
2. Enter forms mode, focus mode, whatever it's called.
3. Shift tab, until you hear basic HTML view button. This button is at
the
very top of the website. The button is not visible in browse
mode. You need,
need, need! To switch to forms mode in order to see the button.









Re: DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

Heaven Botma <heaven@...>
 

Hi List

The email account has not been used for a long time, so the emails accumulated. For this reason there are thousands of emails in the inbox and there is no time to read them all, so it is necessary to clear the inbox and start afresh.

Thank you for the suggestions. I have tried deleting all the messages in Outlook, I'll see if this reflects on the web as well.

I generally hate clutter in the inbox, anyway, so I prefer to delete unnecesary emails and archive the important ones if they are not sorted in folders.

Kind regards

Heaven

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nevzat Adil
Sent: Friday, 09 November 2018 16:54
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

I do not like clatter.

On 11/9/18, chris miles <grrenfly@sky.com> wrote:
On 09/11/2018 14:21, Gene wrote:
All that work, manually deleting all unwanted messages. Are they
anything you don't want on the site in case of some sort of hack?
Unless they contain confidential or personal information you don't
want anyone to see, in which case the information shouldn't be sent
in an unencrypted message in the first place since e-mail isn't
private unless encrypted, why bother deleting messages? As I
explained earlier, you will never run out of room.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Nevzat Adil <mailto:nevzatadil@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Friday, November 09, 2018 8:12 AM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] DELETING MULTIPLE E-MAILS IN GMAIL

As far as I am aware of there is no way to delete all your emails at
one go in gmail. You have to check them one by one and then click on
the delete button.
I clear those emails I do not need daily.
Nevzat

On 11/9/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com
<mailto:britechguy@gmail.com>> wrote:
On Fri, Nov 9, 2018 at 03:14 AM, Heaven Botma wrote:


If you have a Gmail account with thousands of e-mails, is there a
way to
clean the account at once?
* Mass Selection and Deletion of Gmail Messages via the Gmail Web
Interface
(
https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=0B98uELZbPFnOWXVWcmJFM
2pwdjQ
)


--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*The terrible state of public education has paid huge dividends in
ignorance. Huge. We now have a country that can be told blatant
lies — easily checkable, blatant lies — and I’m not talking about
the covert workings of the CIA. When we have a terrorist attack, on
September
11, 2001
with 19 men — 15 of them are Saudis — and five minutes later the
whole country thinks they’re from Iraq — how can you have faith in
the public?
This is an easily checkable fact. The whole country is like the O.J.
Simpson
jurors.*

~ Fran Lebowitz in Ruminator Magazine interview with Susannah
McNeely
(Aug/Sept 2005)




Hi,


Just select all of the e-mails in the G Mail folder then press delete;
a message comes saying do you want to delete the said e-mails; press
the delete button.The folder is empty.