Date   

Re: I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

molly the blind tech lover
 

Hi.

Happy holidays.

I’ve not tried the golden cursor yet, but it sounds interesting. My goal is to be able to use object navigation in all my favorite apps, word, outlook, etc. It’ll probably make navigating them much easier. It really is neat.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Moore
Sent: Tuesday, December 25, 2018 2:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

 

Yes!

That is why I love NVDA so much!

You can get to every element on the screen whether it be a toolbar, a button on the toolbar, or what ever!

It is beautiful to have the Golden cursor add-on to navigate with the mouse as well!

Go NVDA!

Have a great holiday everyone!

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: molly the blind tech lover
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 9:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

 

Hey guys, Molly here again.

I just like to say that I really like Nvda’s way of navigating objects. It is great to be able to press Nvda plus shift and the arrow keys to explore items on the screen I never thought were there. I am fascinated by how it works. It actually reminds me of how VoiceOver works on the Mac, but I don’t want to get in to that.

Anyway, it’s very cool.

Happy Holidays

 

 


Re: Tutorial/overview: object navigation

Hope Williamson <ladyhope@...>
 

This was pretty epic! I'm starting to get object navigation after using NVDA since 2013 lol.


Re: I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

 

Hey Molly,

That’s pretty cool!

Haven’t tried out the laptop layout yet, but glad I have a Bluetooth keyboard to test this out!

Merry Christmas!

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of molly the blind tech lover
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:13 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

 

Hey guys, Molly here again.

I just like to say that I really like Nvda’s way of navigating objects. It is great to be able to press Nvda plus shift and the arrow keys to explore items on the screen I never thought were there. I am fascinated by how it works. It actually reminds me of how VoiceOver works on the Mac, but I don’t want to get in to that.

Anyway, it’s very cool.

Happy Holidays

 


Re: Merry Christmas and a happy time whatever your faith andcreed

David Moore
 

Hi all!

Have a very merry Christmas all, and really take time to examine your lives, and see what your passions are and follow them!

God bless!

David Moore

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Arlene
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 5:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Merry Christmas and a happy time whatever your faith andcreed

 

Hey list! Just want to wish everybody a merry Christmas! Hope you all

have a good one@!

 

On 12/24/18, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io

<bglists@...> wrote:

> In other words, let us hope we can all learn to live together without

> killing one another  in the coming years, please!

> Together

> Together,

> We Hate and lie,

> Together,

> we suffer and cry.

> Together,

> we fight and die.

> Why can't we learn to live,

> together.

> Brian

> bglists@...

> Sent via blueyonder.

> Please address personal E-mail to:-

> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

> in the display name field.

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "molly the blind tech lover" <brainardmolly@...>

> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

> Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 12:25 AM

> Subject: Re: [nvda] Merry Christmas

> Happy Christmas.

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ján Kulik

> Sent: Sunday, December 23, 2018 3:29 PM

> To: nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io; nvda-translations@groups.io;

> nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: [nvda] Merry Christmas

> Hi everione, happy merry Christmas 2018

>

 

 

 


Re: Tutorial/overview: object navigation

David Moore
 

That was so awesome, Joseph!

What a great explanation!

I did not know the object navigation commands were based on from the Voice Over commands!

Have a very merry Christmas, Joseph, and thank you so much for all you do for us!

David Moore

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 3:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Tutorial/overview: object navigation

 

Hi all,

 

First, Merry Christmas (for those celebrating it).

 

The following tutorial/overview came from several requests on this forum regarding explanation of object navigation. Although I’ll try my best to go over things you need to know, there are some things you won’t find in this tutorial (either not important or I may have forgotten small details).

 

IMPORTAN: The below document does not replace user guide nor various tutorials on this subject. For a more complete overview (including some more examples), I recommend looking at Basic Training module from NV Access.

 

Let’s imagine a friend of yours invited you to a party (or have some drinks or a date, if you will). The friend tells you, “I live on a certain street in a certain neighborhood”. Once you get his or her street address, you type it into your computer (or a smartphone or ask Alexa for directions). When you look at the map your computer displays, you realize that your friend lives on the other side of town. You then get some directions and off you go.

 

While you were on your way, you took the wrong turn. The GPS you’re using tells you to turn back to the street you were before and continue straight. After five minutes of frustrations, you decide to follow what the GPS says, and after ten minutes of walking (or driving or flying, etc.), you arrive at your friend’s house. Thereupon your friend says, “hey, what took you so long?” You then say, “I took a wrong turn.”

 

Unless you know the town very well, you may have encountered situations like this: getting some directions, somehow getting lost, and you somehow get back on track. Or, you need to parse a slightly complicated street address and don’t know how to get there unless you look at landmarks.

 

It turns out there is a subtle application of what I just described: NVDA’s object navigation feature. You can use certain commands to explore what’s around you, and in some cases, access certain parts of programs you wouldn’t normally can with keyboard commands. For some of us used to a certain interaction technology, this may ring a bell, and I’ll explain that connection later in this overview.

 

First, a few basic definitions:

 

When you think of the word ‘object”, several things can come to your mind – perhaps things you can touch (like a desk), a goal (“… the object of the game …”), and many more interpretations. In computing, an object may either mean something you can see or interact with, or something defined in code coming to life (the latter strays into programming, so I won’t go there). For purposes of this overview, we can say that an “object” is something you can explore and interact with (a graphical control, if you will), and throughout this overview, you’ll see me refer to objects as “controls” – they are really the same thing.

 

Since objects are something we can explore and interact with (on screen, to be exact), there must be means of differentiating between all sorts of objects, with hundreds of them active at once (on screen, invisible, etc.). Each object or a control has a name (sometimes called a “label”) and the type of control (called a “role”). For example, a control that allows you to type something into it may have a name such as “document”, “file name”, “address”, and so on, with the control type being an edit window. A second control on the screen may look like a button with labels such as “OK”, “Cancel”, “Open”, and so on, with the type being a “button”. Still, another control may present a checkmark next to text that says, “don’t show me this message”, “ask before saving” and so on, with the control type being a “checkbox”. In addition to label and role, some controls have states such as “checked”, “selected”, and so on.

 

But if your computer only showed the three controls described above, it won’t be that exciting. In reality, a program you’re working with may include tens of hundreds of different controls, organized into what’s termed “hierarchy” or groupings. A control may include other controls inside, and the container control may itself be part of a larger group of related (or sometimes unrelated) controls. For example, suppose we open “save as” dialog in many programs (such as Notepad, Microsoft Word, etc.). The controls for file name (an edit field), a button to save the document, or a checkbox to not show file extensions may be grouped under a single toolbar. This toolbar in turn is housed inside the “Save as” dialog, with the dialog itself being home to additional larger groups of controls besides file name toolbar.

 

The relationship between the “save as” dialog, the file name toolbar, and controls inside this toolbar is sometimes termed “parent-child relationship”. The whole dialog is the “parent” of file name toolbar and other controls. The file name toolbar, a “child” of the dialog, is itself a parent of file name controls, with the controls termed “children”.

 

Another way to look at this relationship is that of an outline with different levels. For people taught to write an outline before writing anything (essays, speeches, plays, etc.), outlining helps us organize what we wish to say in writing. For example:

 

Level 1: a big idea

Level 2 (inside level 1): a smaller idea

Level 2: another smaller idea

Level 3 (inside second level 2): an example

Level 2: a third smaller idea

Level 1: second big idea

 

And so forth. Now let us transform the “save as” dialog into an outline:

 

Level 0: the app itself (Notepad, Word, etc.)

Level 1: Save as dialog

Level 2: File name toolbar

Level 3: file name edit field

Level 3: show extensions checkbox

Level 3: Save button

Level 2: file browser window

Level 3: files list

Level 3: folder navigation buttons

Level 1: Ok button

Level 1: Cancel button

 

Side note: later in this document, I’ll use a “camera lens” analogy when talking about object navigation commands.

 

So Joseph, where did “level 0” come from? Every application (except for a period when we had full screen Microsoft Store apps) and things it shows on screen are housed inside a host window (level 0). There is actually a “level minus 1”, and this is the shell window (the desktop area where all the action takes place throughout the screen).

 

In NVDA world, there is one special object NVDA likes to use: navigator. The navigator object is the control you (and sometimes, NvDA) wish to work with and explore. You can move system focus to it, you can ask NVDA to move to system focus, learn how much screen real estate the control takes (location), and for power users, find out what kind of control one is dealing with (developer info). In effect, when you use object navigation commands (see below), you’re moving the control of interest to different areas of an app (or to other programs).

 

Okay Joseph, how can I move through this “object outline”? This is done through object navigation commands (NVDA+Numpad keys on desktop layout, NVDA+Shift+arrows in laptop layout; for consistency, I’ll use “Numpad arrows” for desktop layout commands) as follows:

 

  • NVDA+Numpad 5 (NVDA+Shift+O in laptop layout): current control/object NVDA is looking at.
  • NVDA+Numpad right arrow/Numpad 6 (NVDA+Shift+Right arrow in laptop layout): next control at the same level.
  • NVDA+Numpad left arrow/Numpad 4 (NVDA+Shift+Left arrow in laptop layout): previous control at the same level.
  • NVDA+Numpad down arrow/Numpad 2 (NVDA+Shift+Down arrow in laptop layout): move down one level if there are controls and choose the first one (first child).
  • NVDA+Numpad up arrow/Numpad 8 (NVDA+Shift+Up arrow in laptop layout): move up one level (parent).

 

Or, if you are into photography or video production (creation/editing, etc.), you can think of it as a camera lens (or for audio gurus, where you place your microphone):

 

  • Current object: the focus of the camera.
  • Next or previous object: focusing on something else.
  • Child object: zoom in (narrow the focus of the camera to something).
  • Parent object: zoom out (expand camera focus to include other things besides the thing you were looking at).

 

And going one step further, using the street address example from the beginning:

 

  • Current control: where you are at.
  • Next/previous control: nearby street addresses or streets.
  • Child control: house/apartment/building, etc.
  • Parent: the town.

 

For those who’d like to learn by examples, try:

 

Example 1: Notepad:

  1. Open Notepad (the fastest way to open Notepad (or for that matter, any program or folder) is searching for it from Start menu/screen).
  2. Use object navigation commands to move around Notepad. For instance, when Notepad first opens, navigator object will be placed on the document window. Moving to the next object, you’ll find status bar (unless disabled), and moving to previous objects will let you explore system menu and application menu bar (not the menus themselves). As you move through next or previous controls. If NVDA says “no next” or “no previous”, then you’ve reached the end of group of controls for the current level.
  3. Try moving inside one of the controls (for example, move down one level from document window). If NVDA says, “no objects inside”, then you’ve reached the bottommost level.
  4. Move up to a parent control from document window. You’ll find yourself “looking” at Notepad window. Moving up some more, you’ll eventually hear NVDA say, “no containing object”, which means you’ve reached the topmost control.

 

Example 2: Settings app (Windows 10 only):

  1. Press Windows+I to open Settings.
  2. Go to System category (press Tab to move to categories first), then go to About item and press Enter.
  3. Move up one level (NVDA+Numpad up arrow/NVDA+Shift+Up arrow), then move to the next group of controls. You’ll find out various status for security, firewall and so on.
  4. When you meet a grouping such as “Device specifications” or “Windows specifications”, move one level down (NVDA+Numpad down arrow/NVDA+Shift+Down arrow) and explore the specifications for your device or Windows installation (after moving down, move to next (NVDA+Numpad right arrow/NVDA+Shift+Right arrow) or previous (NVDA+Numpad left arrow/NVDA+Shift+Left arrow) controls).
  5. After exploring a grouping, move up one level and explore other controls on screen (or another program if you wish).
  6. If you want, you can activate controls by pressing NVDA+Numpad enter/NVDA+Enter in laptop layout).

 

But wait a minute Joseph, all these commands sound familiar. If you are coming from (or currently using) any touch-based smartphone with built-in screen readers, you may have noticed that the commands described above are exactly the kind of technique you would (or taught to) use when navigating the touchscreen interface for the first time. In fact, NVDA’s object navigation commands for touchscreens were inspired by VoiceOver (iOS). Specifically:

 

  • One finger flick right/left: next/previous control everywhere (regardless of level).
  • Two finger flick left/right: next/previous control on the same level.
  • One finger flick up/down: move up/down one level.
  • One finger double tap: activate the control you’re on.

 

A very keen person may have noticed that, while practicing object navigation commands, NVDA would skip some controls. Why? Because some controls on screen are present for layout purposes, and NvDA will skip them if simple review mode is turned on (by default, it is on). If you wish to explore layout controls (and explore the whole object hierarchy), you need to turn off simple review mode (NVDA Settings/Review cursor/simple review mode).

 

Because the overview was meant for users, I didn’t go over additional commands related to objects. They can be found in the user guide (for some of them). Again if you wish to see more examples and slightly more in-depth explanations, I highly recommend getting Basic Training module for NVDA from NV Access (it is cheap and is more authoritative than this overview).

 

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Joseph

 


Re: Christmas Greetings

David Moore
 

Hi all!

Merry Christmas all in this great community!

NVDA is such a blessing, and I thank all of you for making my life so much better for

Making NVDA better everyday and all of the time you sacrifice putting into it!

David Moore

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Ian Westerland
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 6:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Christmas Greetings

 

Hi everyone.  Firstly, I wish everyone a very happy Christmas.  Thank

you to all who develop, test and otherwise keep NVDA getting better and

better with each release.

 

Ian Westerland

 

 

 

 

 


Re: I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

David Moore
 

Yes!

That is why I love NVDA so much!

You can get to every element on the screen whether it be a toolbar, a button on the toolbar, or what ever!

It is beautiful to have the Golden cursor add-on to navigate with the mouse as well!

Go NVDA!

Have a great holiday everyone!

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: molly the blind tech lover
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 9:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

 

Hey guys, Molly here again.

I just like to say that I really like Nvda’s way of navigating objects. It is great to be able to press Nvda plus shift and the arrow keys to explore items on the screen I never thought were there. I am fascinated by how it works. It actually reminds me of how VoiceOver works on the Mac, but I don’t want to get in to that.

Anyway, it’s very cool.

Happy Holidays

 

 


Re: how to use emojis with Nvda

hurrikennyandopo ...
 

Hi


If you are interested before christmas i uploaded a tutorial for the later version of windows with the emoji panel and windows 1809.


it can be found at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net/nvda%20tutorials%20for%20windows%2010.html

You once there will just need to jump down to the headings for them and how to navigate them.


There is some other material i put up there but not let the list know it has been posted it must be this time of year.


Gene nz


On 25/12/2018 10:00 AM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Hey guys.

My apologies if this topic has been mentioned before. But I was wondering, how does one go about using the windows emoji panel (not sure if that’s what it’s called) with Nvda? Do I need to be using a specific program to use emojis? Microsoft Word, for example?

Thanks.

And happy holidays.

--
Check out my website for NVDA tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net Regardless of where you are in New Zealand if you are near one of the APNK sites you can use a copy of the NVDA screen reader on one of their computers. To find out which locations (or location) is near to you please visit http://www.aotearoapeoplesnetwork.org/content/partner-libraries (Aotearoa People's Network Kaharoa). To find an NVDA certified expert near you, please visit the following link https://certification.nvaccess.org/. The certification page contains the official list of NVDA certified individuals from around the world, who have sat and successfully passed the NVDA expert exam.


Santa is bringing new add-on updates: Resource Monitor 19.01, SystrayList 3.2 #addonrelease

 

Hi all,

 

A message from Santa: ho, ho, ho, I’ve got new NVDA add-ons on the sleigh! Open up your NVDA chimneys so I can bring them down to you!

 

The add-on updates in question are:

 

  • Resource Monitor 19.01: localization updates.
  • SystrayList 3.2: localization updates and makes the ad-on compatible with Python 3.

 

Enjoy.

]Cheers,

Joseph


I am really loving Nvda's object navigation

molly the blind tech lover
 

Hey guys, Molly here again.

I just like to say that I really like Nvda’s way of navigating objects. It is great to be able to press Nvda plus shift and the arrow keys to explore items on the screen I never thought were there. I am fascinated by how it works. It actually reminds me of how VoiceOver works on the Mac, but I don’t want to get in to that.

Anyway, it’s very cool.

Happy Holidays

 


Re: how to use emojis with Nvda

molly the blind tech lover
 

Sorry. I must have pressed the letter s by mistake. I’m glad it worked though. 😊

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Stewart
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 5:17 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

 

Hey that worked here! NVDA read it out to me as smiling face with smiling eyes S!

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 12/24/2018 3:30 PM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Okay. I’ll try to insert an emoji here. It may not look correct. Let me know. I’ll be at the end of this response. 😊s

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

 

Feel free to write back if you can't deal with it. Let's trying until I or another member can help you out :)

Em 24/12/2018 19:22, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Thanks.

I�ll try again.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:17 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

What you get when you are into the emoji panel? It should at least offer you some categories to go tabing through and inside of these categories it should have the emojis.
Things are a bit different on the latest Windows 10 version, that I'm not using at the moment. But not that different than what I've said. You should at least be able to paste an emoji on the field.


�

Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:13, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

I found the emoji panel. How do I select the one I want? I hit enter� but it didn�t insert the emoji.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

Hi Molly,
Not at all. All we need to use the emoji panel is a edit field, that is, a place where you can write and delete things, something like.
So, if you have found this place, just press Windows+. or Windows+; (I'm not sure at all) and there you go.
Hth

�


Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:00, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Hey guys.

My apologies if this topic has been mentioned before. But I was wondering, how does one go about using the windows emoji panel (not sure if that�s what it�s called) with Nvda? Do I need to be using a specific program to use emojis? Microsoft Word, for example?

Thanks.

And happy holidays.

�

�

 

 


Christmas Greetings

Ian Westerland
 

Hi everyone. Firstly, I wish everyone a very happy Christmas. Thank you to all who develop, test and otherwise keep NVDA getting better and better with each release.

Ian Westerland


Re: Tutorial/overview: object navigation

 

Thanks for the tutorial, I will read the rest of it later, but I understand how it works.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Raha Tehrani
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 10:29 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tutorial/overview: object navigation

thanks a million Joseph.
merry Christmas as well.

On 12/24/18, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi all,



First, Merry Christmas (for those celebrating it).



The following tutorial/overview came from several requests on this
forum regarding explanation of object navigation. Although I'll try my
best to go over things you need to know, there are some things you
won't find in this tutorial (either not important or I may have forgotten small details).



IMPORTAN: The below document does not replace user guide nor various
tutorials on this subject. For a more complete overview (including
some more examples), I recommend looking at Basic Training module from
NV Access.



Let's imagine a friend of yours invited you to a party (or have some
drinks or a date, if you will). The friend tells you, "I live on a
certain street in a certain neighborhood". Once you get his or her
street address, you type it into your computer (or a smartphone or ask
Alexa for directions). When you look at the map your computer
displays, you realize that your friend lives on the other side of
town. You then get some directions and off you go.



While you were on your way, you took the wrong turn. The GPS you're
using tells you to turn back to the street you were before and continue straight.
After five minutes of frustrations, you decide to follow what the GPS
says, and after ten minutes of walking (or driving or flying, etc.),
you arrive at your friend's house. Thereupon your friend says, "hey,
what took you so long?" You then say, "I took a wrong turn."



Unless you know the town very well, you may have encountered
situations like
this: getting some directions, somehow getting lost, and you somehow
get back on track. Or, you need to parse a slightly complicated street
address and don't know how to get there unless you look at landmarks.



It turns out there is a subtle application of what I just described:
NVDA's object navigation feature. You can use certain commands to
explore what's around you, and in some cases, access certain parts of
programs you wouldn't normally can with keyboard commands. For some of
us used to a certain interaction technology, this may ring a bell, and
I'll explain that connection later in this overview.



First, a few basic definitions:



When you think of the word 'object", several things can come to your
mind - perhaps things you can touch (like a desk), a goal (". the
object of the game ."), and many more interpretations. In computing,
an object may either mean something you can see or interact with, or
something defined in code coming to life (the latter strays into programming, so I won't go there).
For purposes of this overview, we can say that an "object" is
something you can explore and interact with (a graphical control, if
you will), and throughout this overview, you'll see me refer to
objects as "controls" - they are really the same thing.



Since objects are something we can explore and interact with (on
screen, to be exact), there must be means of differentiating between
all sorts of objects, with hundreds of them active at once (on screen, invisible, etc.).
Each object or a control has a name (sometimes called a "label") and
the type of control (called a "role"). For example, a control that
allows you to type something into it may have a name such as
"document", "file name", "address", and so on, with the control type
being an edit window. A second control on the screen may look like a
button with labels such as "OK", "Cancel", "Open", and so on, with the
type being a "button". Still, another control may present a checkmark
next to text that says, "don't show me this message", "ask before
saving" and so on, with the control type being a "checkbox". In
addition to label and role, some controls have states such as
"checked", "selected", and so on.



But if your computer only showed the three controls described above,
it won't be that exciting. In reality, a program you're working with
may include tens of hundreds of different controls, organized into
what's termed "hierarchy" or groupings. A control may include other
controls inside, and the container control may itself be part of a
larger group of related (or sometimes unrelated) controls. For
example, suppose we open "save as"
dialog
in many programs (such as Notepad, Microsoft Word, etc.). The controls
for file name (an edit field), a button to save the document, or a
checkbox to not show file extensions may be grouped under a single
toolbar. This toolbar in turn is housed inside the "Save as" dialog,
with the dialog itself being home to additional larger groups of
controls besides file name toolbar.



The relationship between the "save as" dialog, the file name toolbar,
and controls inside this toolbar is sometimes termed "parent-child
relationship". The whole dialog is the "parent" of file name toolbar
and other controls. The file name toolbar, a "child" of the dialog, is
itself a parent of file name controls, with the controls termed "children".



Another way to look at this relationship is that of an outline with
different levels. For people taught to write an outline before writing
anything (essays, speeches, plays, etc.), outlining helps us organize
what we wish to say in writing. For example:



Level 1: a big idea

Level 2 (inside level 1): a smaller idea

Level 2: another smaller idea

Level 3 (inside second level 2): an example

Level 2: a third smaller idea

Level 1: second big idea



And so forth. Now let us transform the "save as" dialog into an outline:



Level 0: the app itself (Notepad, Word, etc.)

Level 1: Save as dialog

Level 2: File name toolbar

Level 3: file name edit field

Level 3: show extensions checkbox

Level 3: Save button

Level 2: file browser window

Level 3: files list

Level 3: folder navigation buttons

Level 1: Ok button

Level 1: Cancel button



Side note: later in this document, I'll use a "camera lens" analogy
when talking about object navigation commands.



So Joseph, where did "level 0" come from? Every application (except
for a period when we had full screen Microsoft Store apps) and things
it shows on screen are housed inside a host window (level 0). There is
actually a "level minus 1", and this is the shell window (the desktop
area where all the action takes place throughout the screen).



In NVDA world, there is one special object NVDA likes to use: navigator.
The
navigator object is the control you (and sometimes, NvDA) wish to work
with and explore. You can move system focus to it, you can ask NVDA to
move to system focus, learn how much screen real estate the control
takes (location), and for power users, find out what kind of control
one is dealing with (developer info). In effect, when you use object
navigation commands (see below), you're moving the control of interest
to different areas of an app (or to other programs).



Okay Joseph, how can I move through this "object outline"? This is
done through object navigation commands (NVDA+Numpad keys on desktop
layout,
NVDA+Shift+arrows in laptop layout; for consistency, I'll use "Numpad
arrows" for desktop layout commands) as follows:



* NVDA+Numpad 5 (NVDA+Shift+O in laptop layout): current
control/object NVDA is looking at.
* NVDA+Numpad right arrow/Numpad 6 (NVDA+Shift+Right arrow in laptop
layout): next control at the same level.
* NVDA+Numpad left arrow/Numpad 4 (NVDA+Shift+Left arrow in laptop
layout): previous control at the same level.
* NVDA+Numpad down arrow/Numpad 2 (NVDA+Shift+Down arrow in laptop
layout): move down one level if there are controls and choose the
first one (first child).
* NVDA+Numpad up arrow/Numpad 8 (NVDA+Shift+Up arrow in laptop
layout): move up one level (parent).



Or, if you are into photography or video production (creation/editing,
etc.), you can think of it as a camera lens (or for audio gurus, where
you place your microphone):



* Current object: the focus of the camera.
* Next or previous object: focusing on something else.
* Child object: zoom in (narrow the focus of the camera to something).
* Parent object: zoom out (expand camera focus to include other things
besides the thing you were looking at).



And going one step further, using the street address example from the
beginning:



* Current control: where you are at.
* Next/previous control: nearby street addresses or streets.
* Child control: house/apartment/building, etc.
* Parent: the town.



For those who'd like to learn by examples, try:



Example 1: Notepad:

1. Open Notepad (the fastest way to open Notepad (or for that matter,
any program or folder) is searching for it from Start menu/screen).
2. Use object navigation commands to move around Notepad. For instance,
when Notepad first opens, navigator object will be placed on the
document window. Moving to the next object, you'll find status bar
(unless disabled), and moving to previous objects will let you explore
system menu and application menu bar (not the menus themselves). As
you move through next or previous controls. If NVDA says "no next" or
"no previous", then you've reached the end of group of controls for
the current level.
3. Try moving inside one of the controls (for example, move down one
level from document window). If NVDA says, "no objects inside", then
you've reached the bottommost level.
4. Move up to a parent control from document window. You'll find
yourself "looking" at Notepad window. Moving up some more, you'll
eventually hear NVDA say, "no containing object", which means you've
reached the topmost control.



Example 2: Settings app (Windows 10 only):

1. Press Windows+I to open Settings.
2. Go to System category (press Tab to move to categories first), then
go to About item and press Enter.
3. Move up one level (NVDA+Numpad up arrow/NVDA+Shift+Up arrow), then
move to the next group of controls. You'll find out various status for
security, firewall and so on.
4. When you meet a grouping such as "Device specifications" or "Windows
specifications", move one level down (NVDA+Numpad down
arrow/NVDA+Shift+Down
arrow) and explore the specifications for your device or Windows
installation (after moving down, move to next (NVDA+Numpad right
arrow/NVDA+Shift+Right arrow) or previous (NVDA+Numpad left
arrow/NVDA+Shift+Left arrow) controls).
5. After exploring a grouping, move up one level and explore other
controls on screen (or another program if you wish).
6. If you want, you can activate controls by pressing NVDA+Numpad
enter/NVDA+Enter in laptop layout).



But wait a minute Joseph, all these commands sound familiar. If you
are coming from (or currently using) any touch-based smartphone with
built-in screen readers, you may have noticed that the commands
described above are exactly the kind of technique you would (or taught
to) use when navigating the touchscreen interface for the first time.
In fact, NVDA's object navigation commands for touchscreens were inspired by VoiceOver (iOS).
Specifically:



* One finger flick right/left: next/previous control everywhere
(regardless of level).
* Two finger flick left/right: next/previous control on the same
level.
* One finger flick up/down: move up/down one level.
* One finger double tap: activate the control you're on.



A very keen person may have noticed that, while practicing object
navigation commands, NVDA would skip some controls. Why? Because some
controls on screen are present for layout purposes, and NvDA will skip
them if simple review mode is turned on (by default, it is on). If you
wish to explore layout controls (and explore the whole object
hierarchy), you need to turn off simple review mode (NVDA
Settings/Review cursor/simple review mode).



Because the overview was meant for users, I didn't go over additional
commands related to objects. They can be found in the user guide (for
some of them). Again if you wish to see more examples and slightly
more in-depth explanations, I highly recommend getting Basic Training
module for NVDA from NV Access (it is cheap and is more authoritative
than this overview).



Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Joseph





Re: Merry Christmas

 

Hmmph, bar the shirts and socks pluss a bar mixing set I have almost no interest in actually using, I have had no electronic anything at all this year yet.

On 12/24/2018 2:07 PM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:
I'm hoping for a google home hub this year. And to spend time with family and eat salmon and stuffed mushrooms and lots of sweets.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keao Wright
Sent: Sunday, December 23, 2018 7:58 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas all, can't wait.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Sunday, December 23, 2018 2:55 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Merry Christmas

Hi, Molly,


I'm really excited for Christmas too. I knitted dishcloths for everyone for Christmas this year. I usually give gift certificates but this year I thought I'd do something different.


Rosemarie



On 12/23/2018 4:31 PM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:
I'm so excited for Christmas!!!! Family, friends, delicious food. I miss my sister so much and can't wait to see her on Christmas.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie
Chavarria
Sent: Sunday, December 23, 2018 6:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Merry Christmas

Happy and Merry Christmas from me to everyone on the list.



On 12/23/2018 3:21 PM, Laurie Mehta via Groups.Io wrote:
Happy Christmas to you as well, and to everyone on the list!
-Laurie
--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 12/23/18, Ján Kulik <jan.kulik.szsle@outlook.sk> wrote:

Subject: [nvda] Merry Christmas
To: "nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io" <nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io>, "nvda-translations@groups.io" <nvda-translations@groups.io>, "nvda@nvda.groups.io" <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, December 23, 2018, 12:28 PM

Hi everione, happy merry Christmas 2018




















.


Re: Merry Christmas

 

Had most of my christmas yesterday will have a little today.

Its not as exciting as it used to be when I was yunger.

Its certainly not exciting for ios 12.1.2 users if you have it then you may have to reformat or restore back to a time you didn't have it, but if you don't, then don't because apple broke it and no fix yet.

On 12/24/2018 1:54 PM, Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, Molly,


I'm really excited for Christmas too. I knitted dishcloths for everyone for Christmas this year. I usually give gift certificates but this year I thought I'd do something different.


Rosemarie



On 12/23/2018 4:31 PM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:
I'm so excited for Christmas!!!! Family, friends, delicious food. I miss my sister so much and can't wait to see her on Christmas.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Sunday, December 23, 2018 6:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Merry Christmas

Happy and Merry Christmas from me to everyone on the list.



On 12/23/2018 3:21 PM, Laurie Mehta via Groups.Io wrote:
Happy Christmas to you as well, and to everyone on the list!
-Laurie
--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 12/23/18, Ján Kulik <jan.kulik.szsle@outlook.sk> wrote:

   Subject: [nvda] Merry Christmas
   To: "nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io" <nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io>, "nvda-translations@groups.io" <nvda-translations@groups.io>, "nvda@nvda.groups.io" <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
   Date: Sunday, December 23, 2018, 12:28 PM
      Hi everione, happy merry Christmas 2018







.


Re: how to use emojis with Nvda

Roger Stewart
 

Hey that worked here! NVDA read it out to me as smiling face with smiling eyes S!

Roger








On 12/24/2018 3:30 PM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Okay. I’ll try to insert an emoji here. It may not look correct. Let me know. I’ll be at the end of this response. 😊s

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

 

Feel free to write back if you can't deal with it. Let's trying until I or another member can help you out :)

 


Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
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Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:22, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Thanks.

I�ll try again.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:17 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

What you get when you are into the emoji panel? It should at least offer you some categories to go tabing through and inside of these categories it should have the emojis.
Things are a bit different on the latest Windows 10 version, that I'm not using at the moment. But not that different than what I've said. You should at least be able to paste an emoji on the field.


�

Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:13, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

I found the emoji panel. How do I select the one I want? I hit enter� but it didn�t insert the emoji.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

Hi Molly,
Not at all. All we need to use the emoji panel is a edit field, that is, a place where you can write and delete things, something like.
So, if you have found this place, just press Windows+. or Windows+; (I'm not sure at all) and there you go.
Hth

�


Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:00, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Hey guys.

My apologies if this topic has been mentioned before. But I was wondering, how does one go about using the windows emoji panel (not sure if that�s what it�s called) with Nvda? Do I need to be using a specific program to use emojis? Microsoft Word, for example?

Thanks.

And happy holidays.

�

�

 



Re: Merry Christmas and a happy time whatever your faith and creed

Arlene
 

Hey list! Just want to wish everybody a merry Christmas! Hope you all
have a good one@!

On 12/24/18, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
<bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
In other words, let us hope we can all learn to live together without
killing one another in the coming years, please!

Together

Together,
We Hate and lie,
Together,
we suffer and cry.
Together,
we fight and die.
Why can't we learn to live,
together.

Brian



bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "molly the blind tech lover" <brainardmolly@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 12:25 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Merry Christmas


Happy Christmas.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ján Kulik
Sent: Sunday, December 23, 2018 3:29 PM
To: nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io; nvda-translations@groups.io;
nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Merry Christmas

Hi everione, happy merry Christmas 2018














Re: how to use emojis with Nvda

molly the blind tech lover
 

Oops! Man, this is cool. I’ll try not to go crazy here

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

 

Hey you did it! Well you just added an "S" at the end of this but ok you did it right at all.

Em 24/12/2018 19:30, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Okay. I’ll try to insert an emoji here. It may not look correct. Let me know. I’ll be at the end of this response. 😊s

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

 

Feel free to write back if you can't deal with it. Let's trying until I or another member can help you out :)

Em 24/12/2018 19:22, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Thanks.

I�ll try again.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:17 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

What you get when you are into the emoji panel? It should at least offer you some categories to go tabing through and inside of these categories it should have the emojis.
Things are a bit different on the latest Windows 10 version, that I'm not using at the moment. But not that different than what I've said. You should at least be able to paste an emoji on the field.


�

Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:13, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

I found the emoji panel. How do I select the one I want? I hit enter� but it didn�t insert the emoji.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

Hi Molly,
Not at all. All we need to use the emoji panel is a edit field, that is, a place where you can write and delete things, something like.
So, if you have found this place, just press Windows+. or Windows+; (I'm not sure at all) and there you go.
Hth

�


Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:00, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Hey guys.

My apologies if this topic has been mentioned before. But I was wondering, how does one go about using the windows emoji panel (not sure if that�s what it�s called) with Nvda? Do I need to be using a specific program to use emojis? Microsoft Word, for example?

Thanks.

And happy holidays.

�

�

 

 


I got the emoji thing to work

molly the blind tech lover
 

Hey guys,

I figured out how to enter emojis. This is so cool. 😊


Re: how to use emojis with Nvda

 

Hey you did it! Well you just added an "S" at the end of this but ok you did it right at all.
Em 24/12/2018 19:30, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Okay. I’ll try to insert an emoji here. It may not look correct. Let me know. I’ll be at the end of this response. 😊s

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

 

Feel free to write back if you can't deal with it. Let's trying until I or another member can help you out :)

 


Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:22, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Thanks.

I�ll try again.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:17 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

What you get when you are into the emoji panel? It should at least offer you some categories to go tabing through and inside of these categories it should have the emojis.
Things are a bit different on the latest Windows 10 version, that I'm not using at the moment. But not that different than what I've said. You should at least be able to paste an emoji on the field.


�

Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:13, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

I found the emoji panel. How do I select the one I want? I hit enter� but it didn�t insert the emoji.

�

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 24, 2018 4:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to use emojis with Nvda

�

Hi Molly,
Not at all. All we need to use the emoji panel is a edit field, that is, a place where you can write and delete things, something like.
So, if you have found this place, just press Windows+. or Windows+; (I'm not sure at all) and there you go.
Hth

�


Cheers,
Marcio


Where to find me:
My Yahoo! email
Add me on Skype
Follow me on Twitter
Follow or add me on Facebook
Ask me something on CuriousCat


Phone(s):
(+55)21-9-81615268 (Tim-RJ)


My WhatsApp


Em 24/12/2018 19:00, molly the blind tech lover escreveu:

Hey guys.

My apologies if this topic has been mentioned before. But I was wondering, how does one go about using the windows emoji panel (not sure if that�s what it�s called) with Nvda? Do I need to be using a specific program to use emojis? Microsoft Word, for example?

Thanks.

And happy holidays.

�

�