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Re: WG: [nvda-addons] [Nvda-devel] Help NV Access prioritize future work on NVDA

Brian's Mail list account
 

Yes I posted it here the other day. I was surprised it did not generate more chat.
brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Adriani Botez" <adriani.botez@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>; <nvda-translations@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 7:36 PM
Subject: [nvda] WG: [nvda-addons] [Nvda-devel] Help NV Access prioritize future work on NVDA


Dear all,

please forward this to your communities. It is of high importance.

Thanks and best regards
Adriani



-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io <nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io>
Im Auftrag von Alberto Buffolino
Gesendet: Donnerstag, 10. Januar 2019 09:50
An: nvda-addons@nvda-addons.groups.io
Betreff: [nvda-addons] [Nvda-devel] Help NV Access prioritize future work on
NVDA

-------- Messaggio Inoltrato --------
Oggetto: [Nvda-devel] Help NV Access prioritize future work on NVDA
Data: Thu, 10 Jan 2019 15:45:39 +1000
Mittente: Michael Curran <mick@...>
Rispondi-a: NVDA screen reader development
<nvda-devel@...>
A: NVDA screen reader development <nvda-devel@...>

Hi all,


NV Access would like to work with the community to identify the most
important bugs and feature requests for NVDA. With over 2000 open issues on
Github, it can be difficult for us to understand which issues are the most
hard hitting for the greatest amount of people.


By filling in this short survey, you can help us better prioritize our
future work.

Survey link:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScXTe1_l52wVsDdvJNpAQ7qiU7A141BaugI
8XuVxKz0A1TFNQ/viewform?usp=sf_link


As always, we make no promise that creating an issue or filling in this
survey will mean that your particular issues are addressed in a timely
manner, however we will look very carefully at this data, and prioritize our
work to ensure we provide positive impact to the greatest number of users.


Your answers will be annonymous. No identifying information will be asked
for in this survey. However, by filling in this survey you are agreeing
that NV Access may make this data public for all to see.


Thank you for your help in improving NVDA.


Mick






_______________________________________________
Nvda-devel mailing list
Nvda-devel@...
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/nvda-devel


Re: Firefox Issues Concluded Continued

Brian's Mail list account
 

Can you not get the service pack installed. Heck I just installed sp3 of xp on an old XP machine for somebody with noo issues Windows 7 i8s much later and the file should be around.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "David Russell" <david.sonofhashem@...>
To: "nvda" <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 7:01 PM
Subject: [nvda] Firefox Issues Concluded Continued


Hi Brian, and others,

The group I referenced as suggested by Ricky Onsman of Intopia is
called, Knowbility. They are based in Austin, Texas, USA.

Travis, thanks for the web correction concerning WaterFox. Yes, I am
pleasantly surprised at their website.

I found my current version of NVDA is 2016.2. I have win7 without the
service pack. What recent NVDA version can one download who has my
type of situation: Asus computer, desktop, win7 64-bit.

I probably won't be able to replace it until 2020. Thanks.

--
David Russell
david.sonofhashem@...
"chilah phanim" Make G-d smile!


Re: speaking passwords instead of star

 

Marcio,

            I've always wondered whether, buried somewhere deep in settings that I don't know about, whether or not there is a setting for, "When individual password characters are typed, report as:" actually already exists.   There already exists, for instance, the "Progress bar output," setting, which defaults to beep, and has the options speak, and speak and beep as well.

            To me it would make sense to have a parallel setting for password characters, since nothing that's being pronounced when entering them is anything other than a placeholder under normal circumstances.  I'd love to see something like this with options beep/tone, replacement character used.  Some would argue, given how often it seems a small contingent asks for passwords to be announced, that a third option, actual character pressed, should be there, too.   I've become tired of trying to protect people from themselves when it comes to the security of passwords, and there's already an add-on that makes this possible in practice.  It's very poor practice, but it's clear that certain people will go to great lengths to have them announced.  These days, with the near ubiquity of the "show password" button at the end of password entry fields (which I also think insane, but there it is) one can probably get the actual password read character by character if you activate it before entering the password.  These always revert back to "hide password" initially on the next login attempt.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Felix & List:

I believe the triple talk synthesizer is still manufactured. So is the Votrax Personal Speech System by the Federal Screw Works.
Brian K. Lingard


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Felix G.
Sent: January 11, 2019 7:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Hello everyone,
I am thinking of getting a hardware speech synthesizer because I feel it might improve my efficiency by making me independent of existing sound resources on machines. I am aware hardware speech synthesizers are an ancient concept, so I would like to ask around are they still being manufactured for end users. If so, which ones are being produced as I am writing this?
All the best,
Felix


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Anthony & List:

Interesting. Get the most cores you can to run multiple CPU-hungry programs concurrently. If your PC is doing much swapping because you have heavy memory usage as when recalculating huge spreadsheets, SSD should speed up the PC quite a bit. However, stuffing the PC full of RAM will reduce the need to swap.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Antony Stone
Sent: January 11, 2019 6:01 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

I disagree with "needs to have an SSD". It is nice, but it is not essential.
It improves start up time for the machine as a whole, and loading time for applications, but does not affect how well applications run once they are loaded.

I agree with "as much RAM as you can afford / will fit". I would say that is the most important aspect of getting a machine to run well. In addition, it is essential that you have a 64-bit machine and a 64-bit version of Windows, otherwise the machine simply will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM no matter how much is fitted.

A CPU with several cores will help with running multiple applications - more so than a particularly fast CPU.

Therefore, my list of priorities would be:

1. 64-bit CPU and 64-bit edition of Windows 2. Lots of RAM 3. Multi-core CPU 4. Fast CPU 5. SSD instead of HDD

Hope that helps,


Antony.

On Friday 11 January 2019 at 11:52:42, Brian K. Lingard wrote:

Dear Noah & List:

Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM.
32 -GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording.
The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU.
Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that
High-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not
Necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine.
You consume many CPU cycles if you do sound or video editing,
recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.

School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs.
They are also several years old

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of
Noah Carver via Groups.Io Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive
Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines
cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and
web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do
Work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular?
Laptops that you might recommend.


Thanks,


Noah
--
A few words to be cautious of between American and English:
- Momentarily
- Suspenders
- Chips
- Pants
- Jelly
- Pavement
- Vest
- Pint (and gallon)
- pissed


Please reply to the list
Please *do not* CC me.


Re: speaking passwords instead of star

 

Em 11/01/2019 12:50, Brian Vogel escreveu:
If ever there were a place for just a quick tone as each character is typed this would be it.
Wow, it sounds interesting to be an add-on or a built-in NVDA concept. Why you don't pass this idea through the NVDA add-ons list? Someone would be interested too.

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 06:27 AM, Darren Harris wrote:
Ssd drives as has been said do help with loading times definitely but once the programme/application is active it all comes down to ram and CPU.
Absolutely, positively incorrect in practice.   Active programs are constantly doing disc I/O of various sorts, and more importantly, so is the operating system.  The gains in speed from an SSD versus an HDD are incredibly significant to how quick things are for the end user.

And the above is coming from someone who still has only HDDs in his computers.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: speaking passwords instead of star

 

Giles,

            What you've pasted above certainly looks correct.  I'll check the next time I'm logging in, but I doubt that I'm going to find anything different.

            Personally, I've always hated the "star, star, star, star," convention.  If ever there were a place for just a quick tone as each character is typed this would be it.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: speaking passwords instead of star

Giles Turnbull
 

Hi Brian,

it's just the initial logon screen for Win10. I use a PIN and each number is obfuscated with a character that NVDA describes as a circle, but my old dictionary entry for this circle symbol, ●, to be spoken as "star" has stopped working, which makes me think Microsoft have changed which symbol is being used.

It's not a major issue but I did like to hear that a symbol, be it a circle or an asterisk, had been typed :) I'll play around with some of the other bullet / circle symbols in the NVDA dictionary at some point :)

Giles


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Monte Single
 

You cannot install the belarc advisor on a machine that is part of a network if you do not have administrative rights. I know, I tried.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian K. Lingard
Sent: January-11-19 5:19 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Tyler Wood
 

Hi,

Intel Pentium processors can run all of that just fine paired with 8 gb of ram. An i3 can run it, too. This falsehood that an i5 or i7 processor is always the answer really needs to stop.


A solid state drive, however, does make an enormous difference so investing in a machine with one, especially if you'll be keeping it long term, really is a great idea.


On 1/11/2019 9:05 AM, Gene wrote:

That is a general statement and is not correct if you run a synthesizer that is not computer intensive.  I don't know how much more work it is to run an intensive synthesizer but because of slower response time while working with one, many blind people run a very responsive synthesizer such as Eloquence for actual working with the computer.  They use one of the newer more intensive synthesizers for listening to things where they will be just listening such as reading a book. 
 
A screen-reader when used with a synthesizer like Eloquence is not intensive.  I don't know whether an SSD increases responsiveness of the newer kind of synthesizer but my point is that you needn't buy a much more expensive machine to use a screen-reader as I've described.  If you do, and if you benefit from doing so when you use a more intensive synthesizer for everything, you then have to consider the extra money you spent on the computer as part of the cost of the synthesizer and it may be unreasonable.  I'm also not saying that getting a really fast computer would make newer synthesizers more responsive, I don't know.  I'm talking about cost/benefit.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:19 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah





Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Gene
 

That is a general statement and is not correct if you run a synthesizer that is not computer intensive.  I don't know how much more work it is to run an intensive synthesizer but because of slower response time while working with one, many blind people run a very responsive synthesizer such as Eloquence for actual working with the computer.  They use one of the newer more intensive synthesizers for listening to things where they will be just listening such as reading a book. 
 
A screen-reader when used with a synthesizer like Eloquence is not intensive.  I don't know whether an SSD increases responsiveness of the newer kind of synthesizer but my point is that you needn't buy a much more expensive machine to use a screen-reader as I've described.  If you do, and if you benefit from doing so when you use a more intensive synthesizer for everything, you then have to consider the extra money you spent on the computer as part of the cost of the synthesizer and it may be unreasonable.  I'm also not saying that getting a really fast computer would make newer synthesizers more responsive, I don't know.  I'm talking about cost/benefit.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:19 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah





Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Gene
 

As much RAM as you can afford?  There is a mistique about RAM and this illogical statement is part of it, which I see often.  You don't need 12gb, 16gb, 32gb of RAM to use the kinds of programs specified in the message.  For people who use the kinds of programs discussed in the original message, and that's the majority of users who don't use memory intensive programs, the typical standard practice of manufacturers today of including 8gb of RAM is sufficient or more than sufficient. 
 
What's the point of getting 16gb of RAM if you won't use more than 4 or 6GB?
 
I also strongly disagree with the SSD specifdication for the uses of the computer specified in the original question.  The person who asked didn't say he would be doing any of the things specified.  I'm not saying not to get a machine with an SSD, Others who know more about what is being sold today can discuss choices further.  I'm not saying not to get a machine with an SSD, I'm saying that if it means spending significantly more for getting a machine that is equivalent in other ways, then the question of whether it is worth getting the SSD is worth the extra money has to be considered.  I never worked with an SSD machine but I doubt that it matters significantly for the programs being specified.  Once they load, they run in RAM.  Documents would load faster in Word, I would think but but that's not what takes time when you use Word.  It's actually writing or editing the document.  Word, for example, wold load faster but aggain, after it is loaded the real time you spend with the program is working with it editing and writing and doing other things where you work with the document 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:00 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

I disagree with "needs to have an SSD".  It's nice, but it's not essential. 
It improves startup time for the machine as a whole, and loading time for
applications, but doesn't affect how well applications run once they're loaded.

I agree with "as much RAM as you can afford / will fit".  I'd say that is the
most important aspect of getting a machine to run well.  Also, it's essential
that you have a 64-bit machine and a 64-bit version of Windows, otherwise the
machine simply will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM no matter how much is
fitted.

A CPU with several cores will help with running multiple applications - more
so than a particularly fast CPU.

So my list of priorities would be:

1. 64 bit CPU and 64 bit edition of Windows
2. Lots of RAM
3. Multi-core CPU
4. Fast CPU
5. SSD instead of HDD

Hope that helps,


Antony.

On Friday 11 January 2019 at 11:52:42, Brian K. Lingard wrote:

> Dear Noah & List:
>
> Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM.
> 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording.
> The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU.
> Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance
> CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An
> Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you
> do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many
> programs concurrently.
>
> School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs.
> They are also several years old
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah
> Carver via Groups.Io Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications
>
> Hi All,
>
>
> I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
> Not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
> What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web
> Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do
> You have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
> You might recommend.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Noah

--
A few words to be cautious of between American and English:
 - momentarily
 - suspenders
 - chips
 - pants
 - jelly
 - pavement
 - vest
 - pint (and gallon)
 - pissed


                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Re: Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Robert Doc Wright godfearer
 

I think you would be better off getting an external sound card and pointing your speech to it. You will basically get the same result.You can ha have it for speech and your main sound card for media.
***
Jesus says, follow me and I'll help you through the rough spots.
the world says, hey come with me. My way is broad and easy. So what if you get crap on your shoes. You can always wash it off, can't you!
****

----- Original Message -----
From: "Felix G." <constantlyvariable@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:25 AM
Subject: [nvda] Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer


Hello everyone,
I'm thinking of getting a hardware speech synthesizer because I feel
it might improve my efficiency by making me independent of existing
sound resources on machines. I'm aware hardware speech synthesizers
are an ancient concept, so I'd like to ask around: Are they still
being manufactured for end users? If so, which ones are being produced
as I am writing this?
All the best,
Felix



Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Felix G.
 

Hello everyone,
I'm thinking of getting a hardware speech synthesizer because I feel
it might improve my efficiency by making me independent of existing
sound resources on machines. I'm aware hardware speech synthesizers
are an ancient concept, so I'd like to ask around: Are they still
being manufactured for end users? If so, which ones are being produced
as I am writing this?
All the best,
Felix


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Darren Harris
 

I don't think you need an ssd drive. It's not essential. Up until last year I was using a mechanical drive for years. It's the ram that makes the difference. Ram and CPU speed and to some extent the graphics card. I say that as the graphics cards all have ram on them as well these days so you can effectively borrow ram from the card if necessary. Ssd drives as has been said do help with loading times definitely but once the programme/application is active it all comes down to ram and CPU.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian K. Lingard
Sent: 11 January 2019 11:19
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Antony Stone
 

I disagree with "needs to have an SSD". It's nice, but it's not essential.
It improves startup time for the machine as a whole, and loading time for
applications, but doesn't affect how well applications run once they're loaded.

I agree with "as much RAM as you can afford / will fit". I'd say that is the
most important aspect of getting a machine to run well. Also, it's essential
that you have a 64-bit machine and a 64-bit version of Windows, otherwise the
machine simply will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM no matter how much is
fitted.

A CPU with several cores will help with running multiple applications - more
so than a particularly fast CPU.

So my list of priorities would be:

1. 64 bit CPU and 64 bit edition of Windows
2. Lots of RAM
3. Multi-core CPU
4. Fast CPU
5. SSD instead of HDD

Hope that helps,


Antony.

On Friday 11 January 2019 at 11:52:42, Brian K. Lingard wrote:

Dear Noah & List:

Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM.
32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording.
The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU.
Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance
CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An
Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you
do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many
programs concurrently.

School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs.
They are also several years old

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah
Carver via Groups.Io Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
Not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web
Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do
You have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
You might recommend.


Thanks,


Noah
--
A few words to be cautious of between American and English:
- momentarily
- suspenders
- chips
- pants
- jelly
- pavement
- vest
- pint (and gallon)
- pissed


Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Noah & List:

Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.

School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs. They are also several years old

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
Not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web
Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do
You have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
You might recommend.


Thanks,


Noah


NVDA and gmail web interface - can't find the compose email dialog

Rusty Perez
 

Hey folks,
This has probably been discussed here, but this list is way to busy to
follow carefully. :)

I often use the mobile version of gmail since it's just easier for me
to use, but sometimes I need to use the full interface.
Lately, when I try to compose an email in the full gmail interface, I
press the button, and there's a "new messsage" dialog at the bottom of
the page, but I'm not taken to it and I can't figure out how to
compose my email there. :)

Any help is appreciated. Or, fi you just want to link me to a post or
something, that's fine!

thanks!
rusty

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