Date   

Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 03:48 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
If I could afford it I would replace my computers every year or 2 even though they still work. It's staying up to date with technology and going with the best if you can, at least to me.
OK.   Uh, the reasoning is horribly flawed for the average user, but OK.

Business settings don't even do this, why a home user or a student would or should eludes me entirely.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Tyler Wood
 

Hi,

I had to stop reading when you mentioned 16 gb of ram on a machine for a school setting.


You wouldn't touch a machine that is a year old is fine, but please stop spouting the below as facts when it is your opinion and has absolutely nothing to do with the discussion at hand. Not everyone has the finances to buy the best of the best and what is quote on quote yucky for you may suffice for someone else. My surface book is coming up on 4 years old and there is absolutely nothing wrong with its performance. A reasonable processor paired with, perhaps, slightly above average ram (8 gb, for instance) with a sufficient amount of storage. In a school environment, there is, unless video editing is involved, no need for a high end graphics card, no need for 32 gb of ram and no need for something that is not refurbished. I would recommend new if at all possible, but understand that some may not be able to afford that and that is completely fine.

On 1/11/2019 3:48 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

Actually I would not let even that student touch anything over a year old. I don't care if it still works. Many companies don't support let's say a 7 year old machine the school might be giving to their students. If the school can afford it let them buy refirbs that are a year old if that is even possible as long as they have 8 or 16 gigs of ram and the students can use them for class but anything over a year old at least in terms of school settings is yucky to me.

I know a family member who is at their office still using windows I think it's 7. They refuse to upgrade the their machines are 10 years old, but what would you expect from most people who don't really care about this stuff.


If I could afford it I would replace my computers every year or 2 even though they still work. It's staying up to date with technology and going with the best if you can, at least to me.


On 11 Jan 2019, at 12:34, Brian Vogel wrote:

Sarah,

            You really seem to be spinning out over these last several posts.   This really is not about you, or your needs or wants, but trying to offer advice regarding how best to make buying decisions related to computers in general.

             It's not that your needs are wrong, but they're utterly irrelevant to what I've seen as the broader point of this whole topic.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Sarah k Alawami
 

Actually I would not let even that student touch anything over a year old. I don't care if it still works. Many companies don't support let's say a 7 year old machine the school might be giving to their students. If the school can afford it let them buy refirbs that are a year old if that is even possible as long as they have 8 or 16 gigs of ram and the students can use them for class but anything over a year old at least in terms of school settings is yucky to me.

I know a family member who is at their office still using windows I think it's 7. They refuse to upgrade the their machines are 10 years old, but what would you expect from most people who don't really care about this stuff.


If I could afford it I would replace my computers every year or 2 even though they still work. It's staying up to date with technology and going with the best if you can, at least to me.


On 11 Jan 2019, at 12:34, Brian Vogel wrote:

Sarah,

            You really seem to be spinning out over these last several posts.   This really is not about you, or your needs or wants, but trying to offer advice regarding how best to make buying decisions related to computers in general.

             It's not that your needs are wrong, but they're utterly irrelevant to what I've seen as the broader point of this whole topic.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Testers for issues on Github

Adriani Botez
 

Dear all,

 

is there anybody using AVG antivirus or Avira anti virus who would like to test if some issues are still reproducible? Please give me your github name and I will mark you in the specific issues.

 

Thank you and best regards

Adriani

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

Sarah,

            You really seem to be spinning out over these last several posts.   This really is not about you, or your needs or wants, but trying to offer advice regarding how best to make buying decisions related to computers in general.

             It's not that your needs are wrong, but they're utterly irrelevant to what I've seen as the broader point of this whole topic.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Sarah k Alawami
 

I would not tuch anything that's a year old or newer. I want the cream of the corp for future to last me for 5 to 7 years of I can and hopefully my machine will do that, hey if it lats for 10 I'll be happy

Take care

On 11 Jan 2019, at 12:01, Tyler Wood wrote:

The fact of the matter is that most of the processors these days are way overkill for just about 99% of people. General slang is that anything below an i5 or i7 quote on quote sucks. It does not. There are machines from 2010-2011 that, even in this day and age are still running reasonably well for web browsing and the like. Allow yourself some growth but there is no need to go hog wild. A nice balance is key.


Me, for instance, I have a surface book for my portable workhorse. It has 8 gb of ram and 256 gb of solid state storage. It's 4 years old now and has a 6th generation i5. It still runs beautifully and the build quality is outstanding. It came with none of the bloatware that other manufacturers send out because it is a Microsoft product.


On 1/11/2019 2:55 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 02:05 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
So for me I would build a pc thus
Sarah, you have been a voice of reason in this exchange overall.  But the central point, which only this post seems to partially miss, is that "for me" is just that.

Each and every user should carefully consider what their intended use or uses of their computer is and what those require hardware wise.  What fits you, or me, or anyone else like a glove may not fit another well.

Also, I support leaving some room for growth, too, but even the base system you described for your build is just gross overkill for my needs, and always would be in the foreseeable future (who knows, it could become utterly insufficient, but I can't see that in the near term).

Even if someone can afford the latest Intel or AMD CPU, it's an utter waste if all they're going to do is web browse, e-mail, edit some documents, and, perhaps, stream occasionally.

Tool to task, and all that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Sarah k Alawami
 

Tha'ts true. I game a lot ad stream about once a day or so. I hate checking email so have my mac for that.I have not tested word on my gaming pc, one day. Lol! I want to upgrade my os drive to 1tb as I'm already running out of space. Lol! Maybe add 64 gigs of memmory as my scenery launches slowly. I can deal with it for now though.

Take care

On 11 Jan 2019, at 11:55, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 02:05 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
So for me I would build a pc thus
Sarah, you have been a voice of reason in this exchange overall.  But the central point, which only this post seems to partially miss, is that "for me" is just that.

Each and every user should carefully consider what their intended use or uses of their computer is and what those require hardware wise.  What fits you, or me, or anyone else like a glove may not fit another well.

Also, I support leaving some room for growth, too, but even the base system you described for your build is just gross overkill for my needs, and always would be in the foreseeable future (who knows, it could become utterly insufficient, but I can't see that in the near term).

Even if someone can afford the latest Intel or AMD CPU, it's an utter waste if all they're going to do is web browse, e-mail, edit some documents, and, perhaps, stream occasionally.

Tool to task, and all that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Tyler Wood
 

The fact of the matter is that most of the processors these days are way overkill for just about 99% of people. General slang is that anything below an i5 or i7 quote on quote sucks. It does not. There are machines from 2010-2011 that, even in this day and age are still running reasonably well for web browsing and the like. Allow yourself some growth but there is no need to go hog wild. A nice balance is key.


Me, for instance, I have a surface book for my portable workhorse. It has 8 gb of ram and 256 gb of solid state storage. It's 4 years old now and has a 6th generation i5. It still runs beautifully and the build quality is outstanding. It came with none of the bloatware that other manufacturers send out because it is a Microsoft product.


On 1/11/2019 2:55 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 02:05 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
So for me I would build a pc thus
Sarah, you have been a voice of reason in this exchange overall.  But the central point, which only this post seems to partially miss, is that "for me" is just that.

Each and every user should carefully consider what their intended use or uses of their computer is and what those require hardware wise.  What fits you, or me, or anyone else like a glove may not fit another well.

Also, I support leaving some room for growth, too, but even the base system you described for your build is just gross overkill for my needs, and always would be in the foreseeable future (who knows, it could become utterly insufficient, but I can't see that in the near term).

Even if someone can afford the latest Intel or AMD CPU, it's an utter waste if all they're going to do is web browse, e-mail, edit some documents, and, perhaps, stream occasionally.

Tool to task, and all that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 02:05 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
So for me I would build a pc thus
Sarah, you have been a voice of reason in this exchange overall.  But the central point, which only this post seems to partially miss, is that "for me" is just that.

Each and every user should carefully consider what their intended use or uses of their computer is and what those require hardware wise.  What fits you, or me, or anyone else like a glove may not fit another well.

Also, I support leaving some room for growth, too, but even the base system you described for your build is just gross overkill for my needs, and always would be in the foreseeable future (who knows, it could become utterly insufficient, but I can't see that in the near term).

Even if someone can afford the latest Intel or AMD CPU, it's an utter waste if all they're going to do is web browse, e-mail, edit some documents, and, perhaps, stream occasionally.

Tool to task, and all that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Sarah k Alawami
 

I have 32 gb of ram in my system. Why? Because by the time I'm done running everything I'm running I have about 4 free. Plus it is a good idea to future proof. SSDs are good as well as it will minimize heat coming from the system. I can already tell this. I run obs, a capture card, my games, nvda, and a bit more and my system flies. If you have a capture card that takes 8 gigs of ram, so if you have 8 gigs of ram only, your system might complain at you. So for me I would build a pc thus

  1. As much ram as you can afford
  2. As much ssd drives ad you can afford
  3. The fastest processor you can afford
  4. the fastest graphics card you can afford, mine has 6 gigs of memory.

I won't touch a computer with any less than 8 to 16 gigs of memory and windows 10 pro.

On 11 Jan 2019, at 6:08, Tyler Wood wrote:

Hi,

Intel Pentium processors can run all of that just fine paired with 8 gb of ram. An i3 can run it, too. This falsehood that an i5 or i7 processor is always the answer really needs to stop.


A solid state drive, however, does make an enormous difference so investing in a machine with one, especially if you'll be keeping it long term, really is a great idea.


On 1/11/2019 9:05 AM, Gene wrote:
That is a general statement and is not correct if you run a synthesizer that is not computer intensive.  I don't know how much more work it is to run an intensive synthesizer but because of slower response time while working with one, many blind people run a very responsive synthesizer such as Eloquence for actual working with the computer.  They use one of the newer more intensive synthesizers for listening to things where they will be just listening such as reading a book. 
 
A screen-reader when used with a synthesizer like Eloquence is not intensive.  I don't know whether an SSD increases responsiveness of the newer kind of synthesizer but my point is that you needn't buy a much more expensive machine to use a screen-reader as I've described.  If you do, and if you benefit from doing so when you use a more intensive synthesizer for everything, you then have to consider the extra money you spent on the computer as part of the cost of the synthesizer and it may be unreasonable.  I'm also not saying that getting a really fast computer would make newer synthesizers more responsive, I don't know.  I'm talking about cost/benefit.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:19 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah





Re: Uninstall Norton Anti Virus

Rui Fontes
 

And why not using the OCR feature?

Rui


Às 17:24 de 11/01/2019, Brian Vogel escreveu:

One can never swear that anything will necessarily work with the screen reader, but it's worth going to the Norton Remove and Reinstall Tool <https://support.norton.com/sp/en/us/home/current/solutions/v60392881_EndUserProfile_en_us> page, downloading it, and trying it as your removal method.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763
*/A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep./*
          ~ Saul Bellow, /To Jerusalem and Back/


EyePal

Janet Brandly
 

Hi Michael,
Thanks for getting back to me. I’ll gather up all the bits and pieces and get back to you when I’ve got things together.
Jan
 

From: Michael Munn
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 1:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] EyePal
 
here is it.
michaelrbms@...
 
Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
National Federation of Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind


 
 
On Thu, Jan 10, 2019 at 3:00 PM Janet Brandly <jbrandly@...> wrote:
Hello Michael,
Would you please send me your email address? I can’t seem to get it from these messages.
Janet Brandly
   
 
From: Michael Munn
Sent: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 7:19 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] EyePal
 
Ok Sounds good. I do need one scaner that I can use instead of KNFB Reader. Email me separetly so I can provide you details. 
Thanks
Best Regards
Michael Munn
 
Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
National Federation of Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind


 
 
On Wed, Jan 9, 2019 at 6:51 PM Janet Brandly <jbrandly@...> wrote:
Hello Michael and others,
 
The EyePal was/is manufactured by ABiSEE and is sold by FS and other dealers.
When I bought mine there were 2 types, a stand-alone version called the Solo and another type consisting of the camera and separate software to be installed onto a PC. I have the second type. I know the software was updated at least to support Windows 7 and that the camera could also be upgraded. I would be willing to give you the hardware (camera, supporting arm, USB cables etc.) as well as any documentation I have. You would have to contact their support department to update the software and info on modernizing the camera.
 
From: Michael Munn
Sent: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 3:25 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: EyePal, was : [nvda] Need help scanning books
 
Can you email me more detail about this piece of Technology?
II'm interested 
I can't afford getting it right now.
Are you Selling them?


Re: Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Felix G.
 

Hello,
thank you for the great advice. TripleTalk USB Mini looks promising.
In any case, I now know the territory a bit more.
Best,
Felix

Am Fr., 11. Jan. 2019 um 17:23 Uhr schrieb Devin Prater
<r.d.t.prater@gmail.com>:


On modern computers, I don’t see much of a benefit to it, unless you’re using Emacspeak where the hardware DecTalk is still a good experience with it. On older computers, or computers with fussy sound cards, it may be a good experience.

On Jan 11, 2019, at 10:19 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

The real question though is this. Can they be more efficient in real terms than the inbuilt espeak?
I did some tests back in the xp days when I had access to one, and to me at least there was nothing much in it.
Of course the old interface used a serial port on my old computer, so it could well be that this ancient device was a bottleneck.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Brian K. Lingard" <bkl@ncf.ca>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 3:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer


Dear Felix & List:

I believe the triple talk synthesizer is still manufactured. So is the Votrax Personal Speech System by the Federal Screw Works.
Brian K. Lingard


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Felix G.
Sent: January 11, 2019 7:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Hello everyone,
I am thinking of getting a hardware speech synthesizer because I feel it might improve my efficiency by making me independent of existing sound resources on machines. I am aware hardware speech synthesizers are an ancient concept, so I would like to ask around are they still being manufactured for end users. If so, which ones are being produced as I am writing this?
All the best,
Felix









Re: Uninstall Norton Anti Virus

 

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 12:22 PM, marcio wrote:
Have you ever tried using object navigation?
An excellent suggestion as well.  This is a technique that will continue gaining prominence in the Windows 10 era.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Uninstall Norton Anti Virus

 

One can never swear that anything will necessarily work with the screen reader, but it's worth going to the Norton Remove and Reinstall Tool page, downloading it, and trying it as your removal method.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Uninstall Norton Anti Virus

 

Have you ever tried using object navigation?
I always do it every time I have something like you're describing.
Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 11/01/2019 15:18, Morne van der Merwe escreveu:

Good day list,

�

I have an Acer laptop with Windows 10 and the latest version of NVDA.

�

Norton Anti Virus is pre-installed on this Acer laptop.� I would like to use Windows Defender instead.�

�

I tried to uninstalled Norton with no success.� I followed the steps whitch you would follow to uninstall a program.� NVDA doesn�t give me any feedback after I hit enter to uninstall Norton. I tried Golden Cursor to read the screen also with no success.

�

Is there a way to uninstall Norton while NVDA is giving feedback?

�

Any help would be appreciated.

�

Kind regards

Morn�



Uninstall Norton Anti Virus

Morne van der Merwe
 

Good day list,

 

I have an Acer laptop with Windows 10 and the latest version of NVDA.

 

Norton Anti Virus is pre-installed on this Acer laptop.  I would like to use Windows Defender instead. 

 

I tried to uninstalled Norton with no success.  I followed the steps whitch you would follow to uninstall a program.  NVDA doesn’t give me any feedback after I hit enter to uninstall Norton. I tried Golden Cursor to read the screen also with no success.

 

Is there a way to uninstall Norton while NVDA is giving feedback?

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Kind regards

Morné


Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Gene
 

This doesn't sound to me like a computer power problem.  It sounds to me like the slowness in Word problem that NVDA has and which Joseph Lee says is being worked on now.  Older versions of Word, based on your comments, are likely not to interact with NvDA in ways that either cause this problem or make it as acute as newer versions.  There is no reason why a word processor should take a lot of computer power and Word, any version, should run well on any reasonably adequate Windows 10 machine. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 10:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Yes, i find 8 gigs OK with a four core processor myself. It was in 2016 a
very good machine, and it still is, but things seem  to have once again gone
up a notch. It has always been my view that the programmers of big bits of
software have not been worrying about the efficiency of their code and we
end up with problems.
 I did try a newer version of word, but it is like paint trying compared to
the old one.
 I'm beginning to think sometimes programmers assume that only their
software will be running!
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 3:41 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications


With Chrome open, particularly if there are multiple tabs, but even if not,
along with Word on a machine with 4GB RAM, even under Windows 7, one can
expect "less than sprightly" performance.

4GB is the bare, bare minimum with even just a couple of modern programs
running, which expect there to be more RAM breathing room than 4GB provides.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back







Re: Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Devin Prater
 

On modern computers, I don’t see much of a benefit to it, unless you’re using Emacspeak where the hardware DecTalk is still a good experience with it. On older computers, or computers with fussy sound cards, it may be a good experience.

On Jan 11, 2019, at 10:19 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

The real question though is this. Can they be more efficient in real terms than the inbuilt espeak?
I did some tests back in the xp days when I had access to one, and to me at least there was nothing much in it.
Of course the old interface used a serial port on my old computer, so it could well be that this ancient device was a bottleneck.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Brian K. Lingard" <bkl@ncf.ca>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 3:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer


Dear Felix & List:

I believe the triple talk synthesizer is still manufactured. So is the Votrax Personal Speech System by the Federal Screw Works.
Brian K. Lingard


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Felix G.
Sent: January 11, 2019 7:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Slightly OT: Hardware speech synthesizer

Hello everyone,
I am thinking of getting a hardware speech synthesizer because I feel it might improve my efficiency by making me independent of existing sound resources on machines. I am aware hardware speech synthesizers are an ancient concept, so I would like to ask around are they still being manufactured for end users. If so, which ones are being produced as I am writing this?
All the best,
Felix







Re: Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

Sorry, ladies and gentlemen, I keep forgetting I can't just paste BBCODE for links into Groups.io.  I think you can still follow that previous post, though.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back