Date   

Re: Weird audio stuttering with latestNVDA Update

Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Yes, I reported the same after updating to NVDA and Windows latest versions.  My other laptop which is still using NVDA 2017.3 and Win10 version 1803 has no problems.  I am about to use the recovery USB on my Acer laptop as the stuttering starts after every 2 or 3 min of use.  It is very annoying.  I tried everything to no use!

Blessings

Pascal    

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Armando Maldonado
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 12:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Weird audio stuttering with latestNVDA Update

 

Hello,

just updated to the latest NVDA update and whenever i'm browsing my computer, working online and such, I occasionally get this weird audio stuttering. All realtek drivers are up to date. Prior to updating I did not experience any issues. Has anyone else experienced? Thanks.

armando


Re: Problem with upgrading NVDA

 

Hi everyone,
There is food, but no utensils... Can I get at least chopsticks please?
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marco Oros
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 10:04 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Problem with upgrading NVDA

Hi!

I have installed new versions manually due to this, that there are errors in checking and upgrading NVDA.

I don't know, that You have same problems.

Thank You.

Marco Oros


Problem with upgrading NVDA

Marco Oros
 

Hi!

I have installed new versions manually due to this, that there are errors in checking and upgrading NVDA.

I don't know, that You have same problems.

Thank You.

Marco Oros


Re: Want to upgrade computer

Gene
 

Minimal for whom?  For you or for someone doing word processing, e-mail, OCR streaming and recording?  When you word things as you do in the below message, there is no definite way to know if you are talking about you and other power users or more generally. 
 
Clearly what you consider minimal is completely unnecessary for a good many users.
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

An i5 quad with 8gb should be minimal.

I'd go for 16gb at least and an ssd boot and hdd for storage.

Or just a drive it doesn't matter.

As a gamer and tester and audio dabler its nice to have the power but I
do have a rysen 5 so I am in a different class anyway.



On 15/01/2019 3:23 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
> Personally and I'm sure there will be as many answers as there are
> people, I'd go for 8 meg of Ram, I have a machine  with 4meg at our
> studio and it has the  tendency to hiccup when writing audio files.
> Of course you need to start with what it is you want to do. If its
> browse a few web sites, email and listen to the odd audio stream or
> file you can get away with very underpowered gear. Sadly the way
> software is being built now seems to suggest that its using more
> resources than it needs to, but then, we cannot influence that.
>
> Brian
>
> bglists@...
> Sent via blueyonder.
> Please address personal E-mail to:-
> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
> in the display name field.
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "farhan israk"
> <fahim.net.2014@...>
> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:16 AM
> Subject: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
>
>
>> I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram
>> enough for
>> normal windows 10 user?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> .
>



Re: Want to upgrade computer

 

Hi,
Or rather, Windows as a Service.
In theory, a 32-bit processor can address up to 64 GB of RAM thanks to PAE
(Physical Address Extension) depending on motherboard and operating system
in use. However, for licensing reasons, 32-bit Windows releases are limited
to slightly above 3 GB of RAM even though the processor can work with about
4.1 billion items at once (source: Windows internals, Seventh Edition part
1); there are other factors involved as well (see below).
In order to use Windows 10 (or for that matter, Windows 8 and later), the
processor must support PAE (see above), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extension
version 2), and nx (no execute) for both 32-bit and 64-bit systems, which
has been supported by processors since 2003 (really old Pentium 4 and AMD
processors are hereby excluded). This combination guarantees memory security
to some extent. Additionally, 64-bit systems intended for Windows 8.1 and
later require certain processor instructions to enforce stronger security
and to let Windows use more virtual memory (specifically, compare exchange
128, prefetch, and certain CPU register movement commands, supported by
processors since 2005 or so). Certain Windows 10 features will absolutely
require 64-bit systems (including some crucial enterprise-oriented
features), and the next feature update to Windows 10 includes a feature that
depends on both CPU features and motherboard support (Windows Sandbox, to be
exact, which requires 64-bit processors with more recent virtualization
capabilities which the motherboard must expose to operating systems via
firmware settings).
As for largest RAM one can install (or rather use), as I said above, the OS
may mandate certain limits. The other variable is motherboard: current
motherboards will let you install up to 128 GB of RAM (really high end, that
is), while some boards destined for data centers will accept terabytes of
main memory. Currently 64-bit Windows 10 Home will work with 128 GB of RAM,
while Pro and up will happily take in up to 2 terabytes (2048 GB; there is a
specific version of Windows 10 Pro that'll let you use server-grade
processors and up to 6 TB of RAM for really intensive tasks).
As for use of more resources: yes, some internal Windows features will let
64-bit systems and apps work with more resources. However, you need to
remember that, as processor's native word size changes (how many bits of
information it can process at once), so does RAM requirements to some
extent. On 32-bit systems, a processor can work with up to 4 bytes (8 bit
per byte, thus 32 bits) of information, whereas 64-bit processors will ask
apps to send data in 8 byte chunks (64 bits). In theory, this means 64-bit
apps will require twice more RAM than 32-bit version, and this is aptly
reflected in Windows 10 minimum RAM requirement (1 GB for 32-bit, 2 GB for
64-bit). In reality, 64-bit apps do not take twice more RAM than 32-bit apps
because operating systems and processors can work with smaller data sizes
(the internals of this is best suited for a computer hardware forum than
this one, I think).
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 6:37 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

I thought one of the main concepts behind Windows 10 is that, unlike
previous versions of Windows, it isn't something that you just install on
your computer and leave it like that (maybe applying Service Packs when they
get released), but instead has an inherent "rolling upgrade" so that users
are expected to keep their machines updated and not be using older build
versions.

Antony

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 15:30:39, Brian's Mail list account via
Groups.Io
wrote:

I have just been sniffing around the Microsoft pages and it seems
windows 7 will be no longer supported mid 2020, however just like XP
that does not mean it will stop working. I was also dismayed to learn
that many builds of Windows 10 are not being supported Even Office
2010 is going.
I tend to feel with Windows 10 they need to find a better model to
follow. It breaks so many things that I moved back out of ten.

If they will not support older 10 series builds with security updates
after just about a year or so, it seems a crazy situation to have for
the home user to me.
Brian.
--
I thought I had type A blood, but it turned out to be a typo.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC
me.


Re: Want to upgrade computer

 

An i5 quad with 8gb should be minimal.

I'd go for 16gb at least and an ssd boot and hdd for storage.

Or just a drive it doesn't matter.

As a gamer and tester and audio dabler its nice to have the power but I do have a rysen 5 so I am in a different class anyway.

On 15/01/2019 3:23 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Personally and I'm sure there will be as many answers as there are people, I'd go for 8 meg of Ram, I have a machine  with 4meg at our studio and it has the  tendency to hiccup when writing audio files.
Of course you need to start with what it is you want to do. If its browse a few web sites, email and listen to the odd audio stream or file you can get away with very underpowered gear. Sadly the way software is being built now seems to suggest that its using more resources than it needs to, but then, we cannot influence that.

Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "farhan israk" <fahim.net.2014@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:16 AM
Subject: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
normal windows 10 user?





.


Re: Want to upgrade computer

 

Actually if you can handle it I found a speed improvement with 64 bit windows on win7 with 4gb ram.

But if you like older software I'd stay with 32 bit.



On 15/01/2019 12:51 AM, Gene wrote:
I doubt what you are saying is correct.  Its true that 32bit Windows is limited in memory access, as you say.  But at the same time, 32 bit versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or Windows 8.  Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for 64bit.  I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows 10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used.  But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.
 
All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be upgraded to may well be 64bit.  But for anyone who has a 32bit computer who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

> Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a 32bit
> machine?
>
> Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just have
> minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
> Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
> some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
> imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is, why do you want
> to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
> as they are.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
>
>
> 1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".
>
> 2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
> 64- bit Windows.
>
> 3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
> for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".
>
> Regards,
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
> > I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
> > for normal windows 10 user?

--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

                                                   Please reply to the list;
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Weird audio stuttering with latestNVDA Update

Armando Maldonado
 

Hello,
just updated to the latest NVDA update and whenever i'm browsing my computer, working online and such, I occasionally get this weird audio stuttering. All realtek drivers are up to date. Prior to updating I did not experience any issues. Has anyone else experienced? Thanks.
armando


Re: Want to upgrade computer

 

I agree.

I have been thinking of switching to the business branch.

Its the only reason I would spend the 200 bucks nz on the pro update I have more control of my system.



On 15/01/2019 12:35 AM, Gene wrote:
Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a 32bit machine? 
 
Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just have minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.  Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is, why do you want to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things as they are. 
 
Gene
----- Original message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

> I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
> normal windows 10 user?

--
This sentence contains exacly three erors.

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Re: Want to upgrade computer

 

Well I wouldn't recomend it but I have had the misfortune to have had to do that to a core2 duo 64 bit system and a core2 duo laptop.

Both with 2gb ram.

Can it be done, yes.

Is it a dream to use, no.

10 minute startups await you, slow performance, and then 2 years later your drive or board will explode and burn and you will lose everything but it can be done.

An i3, well its a bit of a joke just like all the other low powered units but it can be done as long as you don't overload the system with to many tasks, 1-2 windows at most and little in background running then you can do that to.

An i5 is what I'd go for, and if you use amd, I'd go for an a10 or anything with quad core.

Yes I know stuff runs on lower specked systems but once you take nvda as an actual program, and a program on to p of that you actually have 2 windows open at once, add all your cloud apps, etc then well.

I have had older systems which are crap with nvda running but probably fine when not probably because people that use them only use 1 window.

On 15/01/2019 12:22 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
normal windows 10 user?


Re: Screen Curtain and Virtual Review: new versions are out #addonrelease

 

Hi,
Sorry, no. Screen Curtain will work on Windows 8 and later, and requires NVDA 2018.2 or later.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of zahra
Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:11 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Screen Curtain and Virtual Review: new versions are out #AddonRelease

hi joseph.
thanks so much for your great works.
may i ask that which versions of nvda screen curtain supports?
for example: if one day i install windows 7 and screen curtain, can i use my favorit version of nvda (2017.2) with screen curtain?
thanks again for any help, God bless you!

On 1/13/19, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

A proof of concept is a product that demonstrates an idea. In this
case, NVDA issue 7857 deals with a suggestion to add screen curtain
functionality to NVDA, and this work is being done by a developer in Europe.

The whole idea behind Screen Curtain add-on was to gather feedback
from the NVDA community about this very feature. Based on feedback
from users, this European developer made some changes to this feature
which is slowly taking shape at the moment.

In fact, Screen Curtain isn't the first proof of concept add-on. That
honor belongs to Control Usage Assistant (now discontinued), an add-on
developed by me that added context-sensitive help messages for various
controls. Nor Add-on Updater will be the latest proof of concept
add-on that has graduated to stable release status, nor Windows 10 App
Essentials the only one where the add-on is used to do early field
testing for eventual NVDA pull requests. In case of Add-on Updater, it
is the realization of NVDA issue
3208 (an issue I myself wrote) that advocated adding add-on update
feature to NVDA, and I'm actively working on a pull request to make
that into reality. Regarding Windows 10 App Essentials, one or more
important features from that add-on has just been transferred to NVDA,
and will show up as part of upcoming 2019.1 release (specifically, in
NVDA 2019.1, you won't need Windows 10 App Essentials to benefit from
improved usability of various time pickers in Windows 10; speaking of
features, emoji panel support was originally part of my add-on until
it was transferred to NVDA in 2018.3).

My sincere apologies for my tone.

Cheers,

Joseph

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ron
Canazzi
Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2019 9:17 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Screen Curtain and Virtual Review: new versions
are out #AddonRelease



Hi Joseph,



Just exactly what does 'proof of content' mean? I went to the add on
page and it really doesn't say exactly except that it 'addresses core
issue 7857.' What is that issue?



On 1/13/2019 10:56 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi all,



I'm delighted to announce the release of Virtual review 2.4 and Screen
Curtain latest snapshot build (note that Screen Curtain is a proof of
concept add-on). In case of Virtual Review, version 2.4 includes
latest localizations from many language communities.



As always, the new updates are just an update check away (via Add-on
Updater, which itself will get an update very soon).



Cheers,

Joseph

--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"







--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Re: Java accessibility

Chris Mullins
 

Hi

Not sure what Operating system you are using but the following has given me trouble free Java Access bridge use under W10 for a long time.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

For 64-bit Windows machines, you should install both the 64 and 32-bit versions of the Java Runtime Environment (JRE), for 32-bit Windows machines, only the 32-bit JRE is required.  Note: if you use the Java Development Kit (JDK), you do not need JRE as the relevant DLL's are included however, Java Access Bridge (JAB) dll-s stil need to be in the relevant folders, so please apply the rules below to get JAB to work with your screen reader. 

 

The Java installers are notoriously bad at putting files associated with JAB into the correct folders, particularly on 64-bit Windows systems and it is sometimes necessary to do the task manually.  I have found that downloading and installing the off-line installers from java.com  gives a more consistent result.  The automatic notification that a new version of Java can be installed is, in my opinion, the worst culprit where incorrect JAB installation is concerned.   Below are the details for putting JAB files into the correct folders on  Windows systems.

 

64-bit Windows 

1A. After running both 64-bit and 32-bit installers, ensure the following dll files are in the folders shown and are dated the day you ran the respective Installers: 

Windows\System32\WindowsAccessBridge-64.dll

Windows\SysWow64\WindowsAccessBridge-32.dll

 

2A. If either/both dll is missing or has the wrong date, you can find them in the following folders:

Program Files\Java\jrex.x.x_y\WindowsAccessBridge-64.dll  

Program Files(X86)\Java\jrex.x.x_y\WindowsAccessBridge-32.dll

 

Where x.x.x is the Java version number and y is the java update number.  You may copy missing dll's from these locations to those locations detailed in 1A above.

 

32-bit Windows 

1B. After installing the 32-bit JRE, ensure the following dll file is in the folder shown and is dated the day you ran the JRE installation package: 

Windows\System32\WindowsAccessBridge-32.dll

 

2B. If the dll is missing or has the wrong date, you can find it in the following folder:

Program Files\Java\jrex.x.x_y\WindowsAccessBridge-32.dll  

 

Where x.x.x is the Java version number and y is the java update number.  You may copy the missing dll from this location to the location detailed in 1B above.

 

Additional Note:

I have had a situation where I could not do a manual copy of a dll due to there being an existing copy in the target folder, pre-dating the one I was wanting to copy, which was currently in use so unable to be replaced.  I quit my screen reader and used Narrator to complete the copy process.

 

In NVDA you can tell if the JAB is not being picked up by checking the NVDA log file where you will find the following warning message when the JAB dll file is missing.  You will find this message shortly before the  line "NVDA Initialized".

 

WARNING - core.main (HH:MM:SS.TTT):

Java Access Bridge not available

 

In Windows 10 and possibly Windows 7, check that Java Access Bridge is initialised using Ease of Access Center.  Open the EoAC, arrow down to "Use the Computer without a display" and press enter.  You should find a check box entitled "Enable Java Access Bridge".    

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of farhan israk
Sent: 14 January 2019 11:13
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Java accessibility

 

Thanks to all. How to get access to dev mailing list? I'm not able to enable java access bridge. If I run %JRE_HOME%\bin\jabswitch -enable command in command prompt, command prompt shows specified path is not available. I also tried arduino ide but couldn't use it due to accessibility issue. I also tried to install android studio but couldn't install it. In second page of I need to check android studio. I pressed space many times on it but couldn't check it. It remained unchecked. I installed clips ide. I found it very much accessible. I can easily use it. I want to know few things regarding this ide. Do I need to change any settings? How to compile and run code after writing code?

 

On Sun, 6 Jan 2019, 8:38 pm Isaac Porat <isaac@... wrote:

Hi


I did not use this particular IDE but used Eclipse and more recently
AndroidStudio both also written in Java.

I did not use Jaws for some years but at the time Java support was very
poor, NVDA support is much better.

As long as you have Java installed the Java access bridge comes with it,
no need to install it separately.

Sometimes for some reason it is not activated and needs to be activated
manually.


Unlike the poor advice given in another message, the java updater places
a message on the tray when a new version is available and if you need
java, always update.

None of the browser need Java they are mostly written in C / C++.

The various security risks when running Java in the browser where fixed 
few years ago and if I am not mistaken from Java version 9 add ons are
not supported anymore.


Regards

Isaac



On 05/01/2019 16:50, MAX wrote:
> My only brush with Java is in the Arduino I D E (integrated development environment,  Jaws will not read it.  Even after installing Java access bridge.  After switching over to NVDA I found that it would.  I did not uninstall Java access bridge so I must assume it is still on my computer.
>
>   
>
>   
>
> 73 (Regards).
>
>   
>
> Max K 4 O D S.
>
>   
>
> I've Never Lost the Wonder.
>
>   
>
> Antique Electronics Site:  <http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/> http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/
>
>   
>
>   
>
> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Andy
> Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2019 12:59 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Java accessibility
>
>   
>
> Haven't used Java applications in a long time, but i seem to recall that you need to install a program called Java Access Bridge, which facilitates interaction between java and screen readers.
>
>   
>
> Andy
>
>   
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: farhan israk <mailto:fahim.net.2014@...>
>
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>
> Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:43 PM
>
> Subject: [nvda] Java accessibility
>
>   
>
> I want to learn java. For this reason I installed jdk and intelliJ ide. But,after opening intelliJ ide, I'm not able to navigate. If I press tab or aero keys nvda doesn't say anything. Got same result with object navigation. Nvda doesn't say anything. Now, what can I do?
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Senior citizan support

Robert Doc Wright godfearer
 

I am working with an older lady who is running XP home. which version of NVDA
 do I need that works with nvdaRemote?  ***
Jesus says, follow me and I'll help you through the rough spots.
the world says, hey come with me. My way is broad and easy. So what if you get crap on your shoes. You can always wash it off, can't you!
****


Accordion menues

Sile
 

Hello all, today when I was using the MyChart medical content management system, I noticed that when you open something like a message, and you try to tab to the content, it says ‘button message’ Thenyou have to use the cursor to actually find the text. Is there any way that you can just jump to the text? The system has no page headers or normal structure embedded in it, just lots of accordion menus access by buttons.

Sile


Re: Want to upgrade computer

Gene
 

What do you mean by when writing audio files?  And what are you describing as hiccups?  I have a computer where programs run automatically off and on because the Task Scheduler starts them.  This sometimes boggs down the processor and recording programs may mis information when recording.  But that has nothing to do with insufficient RAM. 
 
Recording an audio file isn't memory intensive. 
 
Memory gets blamed for all sorts of things and many of those things aren't the fault of memory.  But for some reason, there is a mistique about memory.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 8:23 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

Personally and I'm sure there will be as many answers as there are people,
I'd go for 8 meg of Ram, I have a machine  with 4meg at our studio and it
has the  tendency to hiccup when writing audio files.
 Of course you need to start with what it is you want to do. If its browse a
few web sites, email and listen to the odd audio stream or file you can get
away with very underpowered gear. Sadly the way software is being built now
seems to suggest that its using more resources than it needs to, but then,
we cannot influence that.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "farhan israk" <fahim.net.2014@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:16 AM
Subject: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


>I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
> normal windows 10 user?
>
>
>
>




Re: Want to upgrade computer

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I think more or less correct, though I have to say adding an extra gig to xp after 2 seemed to make no difference whatsoever!
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "zahra" <nasrinkhaksar3@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:49 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


hi.
i read somewhere that windows 7 and layter windows 32 bit versions,
support 4 gb of ram and my windows xp, only supports 3.25 gb of ram.

On 1/14/19, Antony Stone <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it> wrote:
If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a
32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you
want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum
Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the
list;
please *don't* CC
me.




--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Re: Want to upgrade computer

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

OK, then, I have a core Duo laptop still running xp with 2 gigs of memory. It can run say firefox 52 fast.
However a Pentium 4 single core with a similar speed of bus and clock is like a slog loading up Firefox 52, as its been optimised for multi processors.


I seem to recall that 32 bit machines can use 4gigs with advantages, but any more and the use is pointless.
Another thing to watch for on cheap machines is the actual disc size. I've seen tiny, by today's standards, discs in laptops, as small as 120 gigs, and by the time you have all the software and data on them there is hardly any space for doing anything.


My current machine bought at the end of 2015 is a quad core, non multithreaded, unfortunately, with 8 gigs of memory a 256 gig ssd and a 1 terabyte second drive. My mode of operation is to periodically shove less used data onto the hard drive, including all music etc, leaving a healthy amount of ssd for everyday use.

Now nvda is a 32 bit program, and hence has some problems with multitasking I think, which is probably why you do get a core max out at times, since only one thread is running in each core at any given instant in time.
I'm hoping to carry on with this hardware for another couple of years, though whether I can avoid having to use 10 is still in the breeze.
If I cannot I'm in need of a nice easy to use multi account with identities and newsgroups, program.


Does anyone know if OE classic has fixed its access yet?
Brian
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


I doubt what you are saying is correct. Its true that 32bit Windows is limited in memory access, as you say. But at the same time, 32 bit versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or Windows 8. Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for 64bit. I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows 10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used. But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.

All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be upgraded to may well be 64bit. But for anyone who has a 32bit computer who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a 32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Want to upgrade computer

Antony Stone
 

I thought one of the main concepts behind Windows 10 is that, unlike previous
versions of Windows, it isn't something that you just install on your computer
and leave it like that (maybe applying Service Packs when they get released),
but instead has an inherent "rolling upgrade" so that users are expected to
keep their machines updated and not be using older build versions.

Antony

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 15:30:39, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
wrote:

I have just been sniffing around the Microsoft pages and it seems windows 7
will be no longer supported mid 2020, however just like XP that does not
mean it will stop working. I was also dismayed to learn that many builds of
Windows 10 are not being supported
Even Office 2010 is going.
I tend to feel with Windows 10 they need to find a better model to
follow. It breaks so many things that I moved back out of ten.

If they will not support older 10 series builds with security updates after
just about a year or so, it seems a crazy situation to have for the home
user to me.
Brian.
--
I thought I had type A blood, but it turned out to be a typo.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Want to upgrade computer

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Well, it can use the extra, but its paged rather like we used to have in the old 8 bit days when if you recall they would only address 64k of ram, but huge amounts of ram started to appear. I had a half Gig machine based around a z80b, and it used paged ram, which in effect is yet another chip in the mix to do the housekeeping of swapping pages.



Anyway, back on topic. The crux is what the envisaged use is.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
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Please address personal E-mail to:-
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a 32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Want to upgrade computer

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I have just been sniffing around the Microsoft pages and it seems windows 7 will be no longer supported mid 2020, however just like XP that does not mean it will stop working. I was also dismayed to learn that many builds of Windows 10 are not being supported
Even Office 2010 is going.
I tend to feel with Windows 10 they need to find a better model to follow. It breaks so many things that I moved back out of ten.

If they will not support older 10 series builds with security updates after just about a year or so, it seems a crazy situation to have for the home user to me.
Brian.

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:35 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a 32bit machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year. Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you want to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
normal windows 10 user?
--
This sentence contains exacly three erors.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.