Date   

Re: Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

Ron Canazzi
 

This is interesting.  So why does the Cortana voice inquiry launch Internet Explorer by default after a Windows install? Now I changed it since then, but how many people take the time to do so?


On 2/8/2019 6:50 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Article that came out today in The Telegraph newspaper in the UK:

          Stop using Internet Explorer, warns Microsoft's own security chief

If that doesn't convince people that the shelf life of IE is now expired, nothing will.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

Don Risavy, Jr.
 

Okay just did that last night unless there’s a new file?

Thanks.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 7:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

Don,

            Download a fresh copy of SoundInSafeMode.zip to your desktop, unzip it there by bringing up the context menu and choosing Extract All, open the SoundInSafeMode folder, read the installation instructions contained therein.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

Clarissa Mitchell
 

I hardly use IE anymore at all. For me, it's either Chrome or Firefox.
There were one or two site-specific functions I still had to use IE
for because of one thing or another, but I'm going to find a way to
access those sites with Chrome, which is my main browser. I'm still
working on that. I haven't used IE as my main browser in ages. I don't
understand why people are even still using that browser; it's outdated
and, at least on my more recent computers, slow as a snail! To me,
there's really not that much difference in using one of the other
browsers, from a screen reader standpoint anyway. You can still use a
lot of the same navigation commands. I don't know about Edge; I
haven't used it much, but as far as I can tell, Chrome and Firefox
work great with NVDA.

On 2/8/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Article that came out today in The Telegraph newspaper in the UK:

Stop using Internet Explorer, warns Microsoft's own security chief
(
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2019/02/08/stop-using-internet-explorer-warns-microsofts-security-chief/
)

If that doesn't convince people that the shelf life of IE is now expired,
nothing will.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back




Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

Don,

            Download a fresh copy of SoundInSafeMode.zip to your desktop, unzip it there by bringing up the context menu and choosing Extract All, open the SoundInSafeMode folder, read the installation instructions contained therein.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

 

Article that came out today in The Telegraph newspaper in the UK:

          Stop using Internet Explorer, warns Microsoft's own security chief

If that doesn't convince people that the shelf life of IE is now expired, nothing will.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

David Moore
 

Narrator has many key commands that are equal to the laptop commands for JAWS.

For example:

Holding down the caps lock or insert and then:

U, I, and O,

Reads by line.

J, K, and L, reads by word.

M, Comma and period reads by Character.

It goes on and on.

Narrator is a totally different beast in Windows 10 1809.

David Moore

 

                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

As an interesting aside I find the Guide to Narrator that comes up when you use it the first time (and will come up again unless you check the checkbox on the first screen telling it not to) quite useful.  The Narrator Key is either CAPS LOCK or INSERT, so very familiar to JAWS or NVDA users (probably Window Eyes, too, but I haven't touched it in too long to remember).

The Narrator+F1 sequence brings up a searchable list of all Narrator commands and Narrator+1 does a learning mode.

I really need to start working with Narrator more intensively.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

Don Risavy, Jr.
 

Hello,

Could you pass along the steps again in order to install and set up the script for making the windows 10 computer boot into safe mode with speech as missed those. I have the zip file downloaded along with the boot program mentioned; but, need to know exactly what needs done with the zip file for enabling speech.

Thanks.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 6:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 05:40 PM, Chris Shook wrote:

I can find an inexpensive version of Microsoft office.

You can.  The maximum I've paid for a license for Microsoft Office Pro Plus 2016 on the recycled (and legal) license market now very active on eBay is $10.  Most were under $7.

The only drawback, and it's a tiny one, is that most of them won't activate via the internet.  You have to use the phone method, but since the phone method doesn't involve a live rep, just having a key code texted to your phone (or the phone of any friend who can receive that text, or to a Google Voice number) to continue the process.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 05:40 PM, Chris Shook wrote:
I can find an inexpensive version of Microsoft office.
You can.  The maximum I've paid for a license for Microsoft Office Pro Plus 2016 on the recycled (and legal) license market now very active on eBay is $10.  Most were under $7.

The only drawback, and it's a tiny one, is that most of them won't activate via the internet.  You have to use the phone method, but since the phone method doesn't involve a live rep, just having a key code texted to your phone (or the phone of any friend who can receive that text, or to a Google Voice number) to continue the process.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

molly the blind tech lover
 

Didn’t Narrator used to use something called Microsoft sam? I only know that because people have made hilarious youtube videos about Microsoft sam.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 6:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

all windows from xp had narator.

But to be honest, narator on anything before 10 wasn't much good, aparently windows 2000 had narator and aparently it was usable then but who knows.

 

On 9/02/2019 9:06 AM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Do you guys know if Windows 7 had Narrator? I had a windows 7 machine but I can’t recall if it had Narrator.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brad Snyder
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 2:38 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

The “Wayback Machine”, eh?  Love it.


- Brad -



 

On Feb 8, 2019, at 12:25, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

 

I am running Win10, Version 1809, Home, 64-bit and just tested with Word 2010 and Word 2016.

Narrator will not read document text in Word 2010, but will read it in Word 2016.  This is really not surprising, as Microsoft is not going to try to reach into the wayback machine to ensure infinite backward compatibility between Narrator, which came on the scene with Windows 8, and versions of Office that far predate that OS.

If someone has Word 2013 it would be interesting to know whether Narrator works with it.  This was the first version of Word that has a "look and feel" that's very similar to that in use today.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 


Codefactory vocalizer and NVDA

Chris Shook <chris0309@...>
 

Hi,
Could someone do me a favor? WHen using the CodeFactory version of Vocalizer, could you go into a word document and run a spell check?
I would like to know what NVDA reads when in the Not dictionary field.
Thanks
Chris


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

all windows from xp had narator.

But to be honest, narator on anything before 10 wasn't much good, aparently windows 2000 had narator and aparently it was usable then but who knows.


On 9/02/2019 9:06 AM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Do you guys know if Windows 7 had Narrator? I had a windows 7 machine but I can’t recall if it had Narrator.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brad Snyder
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 2:38 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

The “Wayback Machine”, eh?  Love it.


- Brad -


 

On Feb 8, 2019, at 12:25, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

 

I am running Win10, Version 1809, Home, 64-bit and just tested with Word 2010 and Word 2016.

Narrator will not read document text in Word 2010, but will read it in Word 2016.  This is really not surprising, as Microsoft is not going to try to reach into the wayback machine to ensure infinite backward compatibility between Narrator, which came on the scene with Windows 8, and versions of Office that far predate that OS.

If someone has Word 2013 it would be interesting to know whether Narrator works with it.  This was the first version of Word that has a "look and feel" that's very similar to that in use today.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 


Re: Is NVDA Really Dying?

Chris Shook <chris0309@...>
 

Back in the old days, threads like this would be how legends got started.
Now adays, it just starts unpleasant rumors.
In my opinion, we'll probably get ample warning when they start phasing out screen readers.
Now, I think I'm going to try this mute thread thing
Talk to you'll soon.
Chris


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

Chris Shook <chris0309@...>
 

Molly,
That's been my conclusion as well. I used the Office 365 online and was able to read the document.
Hopefylly, if time ever comes when narrator is my primary screen reader, I can find an inexpensive version of Microsoft office.
Thanks to everyone who atempted to help me with narrator. It was not an NVDA issue and I appreciate all of you that took the time to try and help.
Chris


Re: Clock

_abdel_ <abdelkrim.bensaid@...>
 

Hi Yan, Ron and all,

Thanks.

I'm waiting for your return regarding the midnight format.

Cheers,
Abdel.

Le 08/02/2019 à 23:10, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
Thank you for your prompt response Mr. Adbel.


On 2/8/2019 11:08 AM, _abdel_ wrote:
Hi,

I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.

I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.

Thanks for reporting this.

Regards,
Abdel.


Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland









Re: Reading parts of the cursor's line

Robert Geoffroy
 

Hi, Tyler,

The "happiest" man is writing to you here and now! And I've just read the beginning of that very line: your add-on is quite perfect, exactly what I needed and asked for, thank you so much! Many cheers!

One of my advanced friends wants me to ask you whether you project to leave your add-on on Addons.nvda-project.org.

Allow me to say more how pleased I am as I coming for the first time at an English list and that has been my first question. Sorry for my English! I'm sure I can make great progress by reading you all.

All the best,

Robert

-----Message d'origine-----
De : nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] De la part de Tyler Spivey
Envoyé : vendredi 8 février 2019 10:34
À : nvda@nvda.groups.io
Objet : Re: [nvda] Reading parts of the cursor's line

It's the same as JAWS, NVDA+shift+page up reads from the cursor to the
beginning of the line. If you want a different key, you can reassign it
in the gesture editor.

On 2/8/2019 1:22 AM, Robert Geoffroy wrote:
Hi Tyler,

As I'm discovering NVDA and its famous add-ons, a friend tried yours for me. According to what he explained to me, your add-on dos the job but using it seems longer than reading the whole line, and coming back to the cursor whenever it has been left.

I hoped I could have a way as simple as Jaws does: insert+7 reading the beginning of the line until the cursor and insert+9 reading the end of the line from the cursor. It could be nice if we had the same possibility with the whole sentence, which I don't think Jaws offers.

Regards,

Robert


-----Message d'origine-----
De : nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] De la part de Tyler Spivey
Envoyé : jeudi 7 février 2019 16:33
À : nvda@nvda.groups.io
Objet : Re: [nvda] Reading parts of the cursor's line

NVDA can't do what you want natively, but my addon can.
Here's the link again, this time with the readme. I haven't got it put
on the addons site yet because I didn't think it was all that useful,
but maybe it is. Let me know how it breaks and I'll try to fix it.

# Partial Lines

This addon has several operations dealing with lines:
* NVDA+shift+delete changes the up/down arrows to read from the start of
the line to the cursor, from the cursor to the end of the line, or the
entire line.
* NVDA+shift+page up reads from the start of the line to the cursor
* NVDA+shift+page down reads from the cursor to the end of the line.

https://github.com/tspivey/partialLines/releases/download/v0.1/partialLines-0.1.nvda-addon

On 2/7/2019 7:22 AM, Robert Geoffroy wrote:
Yes, it is!

Rkobert


-----Message d'origine-----
De : nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] De la part de Steve Nutt
Envoyé : jeudi 7 février 2019 16:19
À : nvda@nvda.groups.io
Objet : Re: [nvda] Reading parts of the cursor's line

I thought NVDA+Down was read all.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of molly the blind tech lover
Sent: 07 February 2019 14:00
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading parts of the cursor's line

Hi.
Try pressing NVDA plus L. NVDA will read the current line. Press NVDA plus down arrow. NVDA will read the next line.
Hope this helps.


Molly

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Geoffroy
Sent: Thursday, February 7, 2019 7:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Reading parts of the cursor's line

Hi, everyone,

This is one first question: is there any way to read the current line before the cursor and after the cursor as well?

I'm discovering NVDA with enjoyment!

Thanks a lot,

Robert





















Re: Clock

Ron Canazzi
 

Thank you for your prompt response Mr. Adbel.

On 2/8/2019 11:08 AM, _abdel_ wrote:
Hi,

I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.

I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.

Thanks for reporting this.

Regards,
Abdel.


Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland







--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: Problems With NVDA

Gene
 

But again, you don't say if you have run 32bit Windows or just 64bit windows.  I don't think 64bit Windows 7 or higher, perhaps Vista as well, should be run with less than 4GB.  But 32bit Windows is a different matter.  Almost anyone who ran XP used 32bit Windows.
 
I'm not saying 32bit Windows 10 needs as little RAM as 32 bit XP.  I'm saying that it should run well with 2gb of ram in most or the majority of cases.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 2:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Xp would run on 1gb, but it didn't run well.  windows 7 plus won't run well on 2gb.  I have 4 in my windows 8.1 machine, and most of the time it behaves ok, but at times when I have things going on in the background while doing other things, even that bogs down.

XP can certainly run on 512MB, Heck, I ran it on 256MB at times, though it's not recommended.  My personal experience is that windows is not happy with less than 4GB once you get out of the XP stage.

On 2/8/2019 2:40 PM, Gene wrote:
Are you basing these comments on personal experience of running 32bit Windows with 2GB?  That is 1Gb over the Microsoft minimum.  I don't agree with your assessment.  I had a Windows XP machine with only 512MB of RAM and it ran well.  I have a 32GB Windows 7 laptop with 4GB of RAM.  It runs well. 

 
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 12:50 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Sure it is, if you don't multitask, (have multiple programs open at once), leave programs open for hours at a time, and reboot regularly (meaning every day or two), and don't run programs like microsoft office which has some memory leaks that tend to eat memory the longer they're left open.  For some values of normal usage, yes, 2GB is fine, but for the rest of us, 2GB barely qualifies as enough to run windows os by itself.  Tablets are different, since they have a (slightly) different version of windows that optimizes memory usage, but normal windows, under normal usage patterns, it will not be happy with only 2GB of ram, because it will have to swap a lot, and that will slow things down.  There's a reason computers seem to appear so much faster when upgraded from 2 to 4GB of ram in every single case I've seen, and it's because memory swapping doesn't have to occur nearly as often, and that makes the system much faster overall.  Sure, you can get along with 2GB of ram, but it's like driving a bicycle to get around as opposed to a motorcycle.  Sure, the bicycle will work, but the motorcycle is considerably faster, and can do things the bicycle can't.  Same thing with 2 vs. 4 GB of ram on windows.

Don't fool yourself, there's a reason windows states 2GB as a minimum, it's just that, the minimum required to run the os.  That doesn't mean the os will run optimally or even perform adequately, just that it will run.

On 2/8/2019 5:54 AM, Gene wrote:
That is not true.  2GB is fine for 32bit versions of Windows. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2019 10:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

umm, you're confusing ram and storage.  An SD card won't give you more
ram, that will only provide more external storage.  swapping SD cards
allows you to copy more files to those cards, but does nothing for your
RAM, which is where programs run.  2GB is poretty low for any version of
windows, except if you're using a tablet, there's not much you can do
about it. If you're on a pc, it's (usually) easy to upgrade the ram in
the computer, providing you have empty slots or the ram you have isn't
maxed out.  Most machines can only take a limited amount of ram, and you
need to know what that limit is before trying to upgrade the machine.
However, though I don't know for sure, it sounds to me like you're
talking about a tablet, in which case, the ram isn't upgradable.

On 2/7/2019 7:05 PM, Ibrahim Ajayi wrote:
> Hello again:
> I thank all those who found time to respond to my issue.
> Brian, My GBRam is a low grid.  It is just 2GB.  But even with that I
> don't have this problem with JAWS.  But as I said yesterday, chrome
> appears to be reasonably fine with the screen reader, although firefox
> and internet explorer are almost unusable.
> I am thinking of increasing my GB ram with an SDCard.
> Regards.
> Ibrahim.
>
> On 2/7/19, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
> <bglists@...> wrote:
>> Well I'd not go that far but it is faster on lower spec machines,
>> certainly.
>>   Brian
>>
>> bglists@...
>> Sent via blueyonder.
>> Please address personal E-mail to:-
>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
>> in the display name field.
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Steve Nutt" <steve@...>
>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>> Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2019 8:36 AM
>> Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA
>>
>>
>> Use Chrome, it is better than either Firefox or Internet Explorer.
>>
>> All the best
>>
>> Steve
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ibrahim Ajayi
>> Sent: 07 February 2019 00:07
>> To: nvda@groups.io
>> Subject: [nvda] Problems With NVDA
>>
>> Hello:
>> I am having problems with my NVDA screen reader.
>> The screen reader is just too slow when I am browsing the internet.
>> When I am doing some other work like word processing or reading documents
>> off line, it is not slow.
>> This problem has nothing to do with the websites, as I don't have this slow
>>
>> problems online with JAWS.  I use a demo copy of JAWS.
>> Secondly, when I visit a website, or even some times when I launch a web
>> browser like internet explorer or firefox, I hear "internet explorer
>> unknown" or "firefox unknown" and the screen goes quiet, and when I press
>> the arrow down key, that is what I keep hearing.  Some times, when I am on a
>>
>> site, or trying to open a site, the screen reader crashes, and disables the
>>
>> computer itself.  I just have to shut it down, and then restart it all over
>>
>> again.
>> Does anyone understand the problem I am having with my NVDA screen reader?
>> I use windows7 32 bit on a laptop.
>> I have the latest update of the screen reader.
>> Hope to read a helpful response.
>> I am Ibrahim.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Problems With NVDA

Gene
 

I'm saying from personal experience that I had an XP machine that ran well on 512mb.  Maybe if I had run memory intensive programs, and had programs working in the background, it might not have but for browsing, streaming, e-mail, Openbook, and other typical uses, it ran well.  It was faster than my XP machines with more memory; maybe the chip had more caching. 
 
My point is not to argue just to argue, but I don't want those who are running 32bit Windows to assume that performance problems are caused by memory. 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 2:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Xp would run on 1gb, but it didn't run well.  windows 7 plus won't run well on 2gb.  I have 4 in my windows 8.1 machine, and most of the time it behaves ok, but at times when I have things going on in the background while doing other things, even that bogs down.

XP can certainly run on 512MB, Heck, I ran it on 256MB at times, though it's not recommended.  My personal experience is that windows is not happy with less than 4GB once you get out of the XP stage.

On 2/8/2019 2:40 PM, Gene wrote:
Are you basing these comments on personal experience of running 32bit Windows with 2GB?  That is 1Gb over the Microsoft minimum.  I don't agree with your assessment.  I had a Windows XP machine with only 512MB of RAM and it ran well.  I have a 32GB Windows 7 laptop with 4GB of RAM.  It runs well. 

 
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 12:50 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Sure it is, if you don't multitask, (have multiple programs open at once), leave programs open for hours at a time, and reboot regularly (meaning every day or two), and don't run programs like microsoft office which has some memory leaks that tend to eat memory the longer they're left open.  For some values of normal usage, yes, 2GB is fine, but for the rest of us, 2GB barely qualifies as enough to run windows os by itself.  Tablets are different, since they have a (slightly) different version of windows that optimizes memory usage, but normal windows, under normal usage patterns, it will not be happy with only 2GB of ram, because it will have to swap a lot, and that will slow things down.  There's a reason computers seem to appear so much faster when upgraded from 2 to 4GB of ram in every single case I've seen, and it's because memory swapping doesn't have to occur nearly as often, and that makes the system much faster overall.  Sure, you can get along with 2GB of ram, but it's like driving a bicycle to get around as opposed to a motorcycle.  Sure, the bicycle will work, but the motorcycle is considerably faster, and can do things the bicycle can't.  Same thing with 2 vs. 4 GB of ram on windows.

Don't fool yourself, there's a reason windows states 2GB as a minimum, it's just that, the minimum required to run the os.  That doesn't mean the os will run optimally or even perform adequately, just that it will run.

On 2/8/2019 5:54 AM, Gene wrote:
That is not true.  2GB is fine for 32bit versions of Windows. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2019 10:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

umm, you're confusing ram and storage.  An SD card won't give you more
ram, that will only provide more external storage.  swapping SD cards
allows you to copy more files to those cards, but does nothing for your
RAM, which is where programs run.  2GB is poretty low for any version of
windows, except if you're using a tablet, there's not much you can do
about it. If you're on a pc, it's (usually) easy to upgrade the ram in
the computer, providing you have empty slots or the ram you have isn't
maxed out.  Most machines can only take a limited amount of ram, and you
need to know what that limit is before trying to upgrade the machine.
However, though I don't know for sure, it sounds to me like you're
talking about a tablet, in which case, the ram isn't upgradable.

On 2/7/2019 7:05 PM, Ibrahim Ajayi wrote:
> Hello again:
> I thank all those who found time to respond to my issue.
> Brian, My GBRam is a low grid.  It is just 2GB.  But even with that I
> don't have this problem with JAWS.  But as I said yesterday, chrome
> appears to be reasonably fine with the screen reader, although firefox
> and internet explorer are almost unusable.
> I am thinking of increasing my GB ram with an SDCard.
> Regards.
> Ibrahim.
>
> On 2/7/19, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
> <bglists@...> wrote:
>> Well I'd not go that far but it is faster on lower spec machines,
>> certainly.
>>   Brian
>>
>> bglists@...
>> Sent via blueyonder.
>> Please address personal E-mail to:-
>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
>> in the display name field.
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Steve Nutt" <steve@...>
>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>> Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2019 8:36 AM
>> Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA
>>
>>
>> Use Chrome, it is better than either Firefox or Internet Explorer.
>>
>> All the best
>>
>> Steve
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ibrahim Ajayi
>> Sent: 07 February 2019 00:07
>> To: nvda@groups.io
>> Subject: [nvda] Problems With NVDA
>>
>> Hello:
>> I am having problems with my NVDA screen reader.
>> The screen reader is just too slow when I am browsing the internet.
>> When I am doing some other work like word processing or reading documents
>> off line, it is not slow.
>> This problem has nothing to do with the websites, as I don't have this slow
>>
>> problems online with JAWS.  I use a demo copy of JAWS.
>> Secondly, when I visit a website, or even some times when I launch a web
>> browser like internet explorer or firefox, I hear "internet explorer
>> unknown" or "firefox unknown" and the screen goes quiet, and when I press
>> the arrow down key, that is what I keep hearing.  Some times, when I am on a
>>
>> site, or trying to open a site, the screen reader crashes, and disables the
>>
>> computer itself.  I just have to shut it down, and then restart it all over
>>
>> again.
>> Does anyone understand the problem I am having with my NVDA screen reader?
>> I use windows7 32 bit on a laptop.
>> I have the latest update of the screen reader.
>> Hope to read a helpful response.
>> I am Ibrahim.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Is NVDA Really Dying?

Gene
 

There is a mute thread link in every message footer.  I haven't used it so if you do and you have problems, let us know.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 2:09 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA Really Dying?

Hahahahahaha! Ten years later… The thread continues 😉

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of MAX
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 2:35 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA Really Dying?

 

We have established that nvda is not dying but this thread may out live us all.  Will it never end?

 

 

73 (Regards).

 

Max K 4 O D S.

 

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

 

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 1:11 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA Really Dying?

 

On Thu, Feb 7, 2019 at 10:49 PM, zahra wrote:

i really hate narrator.
do you remember narrator of windows xp which i use?

Which has absolutely, positively nothing to do with Narrator as implemented today.  Just as the Windows Defender that's on XP has absolutely nothing to do with the Windows Defender, now Windows Security as of Version 1809, on Windows 10 today.

I have come to accept that, for whatever reason, you are clinging to XP like it's God's gift to mankind.  What I cannot accept is making any comments about any software that happens to share the same name, but nothing else, with the long unsupported Windows XP and it's components.   

Talking about these as if they are even similar is senseless.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

molly the blind tech lover
 

I remember the control panel and something called “my “computer.  

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA, JAWS, compared to Narrator

 

By the way, I just fired up my Windows 7 machine for another question raging on the Windows 10 for Screen Reader User's group surrounding the context menu.

I checked Control Panel and the Ease of Access Center is in there and Narrator as Narrator was for Windows 7 is in the Ease of Access Center.

Narrator then and now are in no way even vaguely similar, at least not in my estimation.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back