Date   

Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Tyler Spivey
 

You can use most desktop commands when set to the laptop layout, but not the other way around.
However, whatever commands you don't like you can customize easily.
For example, I have a layout optimized for terminal navigation based around the home row.

On 3/8/2019 7:42 AM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Thanks, I'm sure glad.  I use the lapktop layout here on my desktop because I can do some stuff without taking my hand off the home row.  I sure do need to learn about the review modes; I can't seem to get them to work.
On 3/8/2019 9:32 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
The simple answer is, "Yes."

Either command set should work regardless of the mode set as the default.  People have discussed "mix and match" here on many occasions when they find the shortcut sequence from "the other layout" easier for a few things they do frequently.

--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*/A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep./*

          ~ Saul Bellow, /To Jerusalem and Back/


Re: Reviewing the screen, help

Gene
 

I'm not disagreeing with that.  but I think there are times when it’s a good idea to discuss something beyond the literal answer to the question.  Review commands are a basic and important part of NVDA and I think its important to discuss them at such times because they are basic and important.  The person may choose to learn them or not at this time.  Other people may find the discussion useful as well.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 9:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reviewing the screen, help

On Fri, Mar 8, 2019 at 10:14 AM, Gene wrote:
But what if the person wants to read screen output for other reasons in real time?
Then they need to learn the commands to do so.   No one has tried to shut down conversation regarding those.

The two needs are not mutually exclusive and most people responding, including myself, were responding based upon the original poster's message which clearly implies, by the presence of the /? switch, that they were trying to review manual pages for various commands.   For that particular task dumping same to a text file for careful poring over is, without doubt, the best way to go.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Reviewing the screen, help

Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 

Thank you folks for this discussion.  I can figure out how to dump my command output to a file (did that lots thirty years ago in the DOS days); But now I think I just have to learn about object and screen review modes.  Thnaks.


On 3/8/2019 9:37 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Mar 8, 2019 at 10:14 AM, Gene wrote:
But what if the person wants to read screen output for other reasons in real time?
Then they need to learn the commands to do so.   No one has tried to shut down conversation regarding those.

The two needs are not mutually exclusive and most people responding, including myself, were responding based upon the original poster's message which clearly implies, by the presence of the /? switch, that they were trying to review manual pages for various commands.   For that particular task dumping same to a text file for careful poring over is, without doubt, the best way to go.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 

just like to keep my hands on the home tow as much as possible

.

On 3/8/2019 9:40 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as the answer to the question is concerned, what happens when you do use the numpad when using the laptop layout?  I just tried it in my very old version of NVDA and the numpad seems to work in the same way with either layout.  But I still wonder why you want to use the laptop layout with the numpad instead of the desktop layout with the numpad.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 9:27 AM
Subject: [nvda] LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

If using laptop keyboard on a desktop computer, can one still issue
screen reading commands using the numpad?  It seems like I could do that
in JAWS; but I can't decide if it works here in NVDA.





Re: Reviewing the screen, help

Sarah k Alawami
 

Exactly. So no need to bring the regular context of screen reviewing here. Just the way to do it in the terminal which is the way I've done it for years, and frankly it's just easier. I can pipe my windows update stuff out to a text file and look later. No need to do with the object stuff when I don't need to.

On 8 Mar 2019, at 7:37, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Fri, Mar 8, 2019 at 10:14 AM, Gene wrote:
But what if the person wants to read screen output for other reasons in real time?
Then they need to learn the commands to do so.   No one has tried to shut down conversation regarding those.

The two needs are not mutually exclusive and most people responding, including myself, were responding based upon the original poster's message which clearly implies, by the presence of the /? switch, that they were trying to review manual pages for various commands.   For that particular task dumping same to a text file for careful poring over is, without doubt, the best way to go.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Gene
 

But some, perhaps many, desktop layout commands don't.  For example, the desktop read to end command doesn't work in the laptop layout. 
 

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Mohamed
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 9:32 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Yes, numpad and other desktop layout commands still work in the laptop
layout.

On 3/8/2019 10:27 AM, Howard Traxler wrote:
> If using laptop keyboard on a desktop computer, can one still issue
> screen reading commands using the numpad?  It seems like I could do
> that in JAWS; but I can't decide if it works here in NVDA.
>
>
>
>
>



Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 

Thanks, I'm sure glad.  I use the lapktop layout here on my desktop because I can do some stuff without taking my hand off the home row.  I sure do need to learn about the review modes; I can't seem to get them to work.


On 3/8/2019 9:32 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
The simple answer is, "Yes."

Either command set should work regardless of the mode set as the default.  People have discussed "mix and match" here on many occasions when they find the shortcut sequence from "the other layout" easier for a few things they do frequently.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Gene
 

As far as the answer to the question is concerned, what happens when you do use the numpad when using the laptop layout?  I just tried it in my very old version of NVDA and the numpad seems to work in the same way with either layout.  But I still wonder why you want to use the laptop layout with the numpad instead of the desktop layout with the numpad.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 9:27 AM
Subject: [nvda] LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

If using laptop keyboard on a desktop computer, can one still issue
screen reading commands using the numpad?  It seems like I could do that
in JAWS; but I can't decide if it works here in NVDA.





Re: Reviewing the screen, help

 

On Fri, Mar 8, 2019 at 10:14 AM, Gene wrote:
But what if the person wants to read screen output for other reasons in real time?
Then they need to learn the commands to do so.   No one has tried to shut down conversation regarding those.

The two needs are not mutually exclusive and most people responding, including myself, were responding based upon the original poster's message which clearly implies, by the presence of the /? switch, that they were trying to review manual pages for various commands.   For that particular task dumping same to a text file for careful poring over is, without doubt, the best way to go.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Gene
 

Why not just use the desktop layout since you have a numpad on the computer?
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 9:27 AM
Subject: [nvda] LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

If using laptop keyboard on a desktop computer, can one still issue
screen reading commands using the numpad?  It seems like I could do that
in JAWS; but I can't decide if it works here in NVDA.





Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Mohamed
 

Yes, numpad and other desktop layout commands still work in the laptop layout.

On 3/8/2019 10:27 AM, Howard Traxler wrote:
If using laptop keyboard on a desktop computer, can one still issue screen reading commands using the numpad?  It seems like I could do that in JAWS; but I can't decide if it works here in NVDA.




Re: LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

 

The simple answer is, "Yes."

Either command set should work regardless of the mode set as the default.  People have discussed "mix and match" here on many occasions when they find the shortcut sequence from "the other layout" easier for a few things they do frequently.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


LAPTOP VS DESKTOP

Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 

If using laptop keyboard on a desktop computer, can one still issue screen reading commands using the numpad?  It seems like I could do that in JAWS; but I can't decide if it works here in NVDA.


Re: Firefox and Extensions' section

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes, but it was not i, who dun it guv!
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 10:32 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox and Extensions' section


It looks like two links have been joined together to me.

Try https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1525569 and
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1525937 separately.


Antony.

On Friday 08 March 2019 at 11:21:02, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
wrote:

PS I cannot make his link work for me, but I'm assured it has been fixed in
the next release.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io"
<bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 10:16 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox and Extensions' section

And finally.. From Jamie in response to my ticket on nvda bug tracker.

This is fixed for Firefox 66, as both patches got uplifted from 67.
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1525569https://bugzilla.mozi
lla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1525937 —
You are receiving this because you authored the thread.
--
The truth is rarely pure, and never simple.

- Oscar Wilde

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Re: Reviewing the screen, help

Rui Fontes
 

1 - Insert+2;
2 - Insert+6 untill you get the field you want...

All keys are from NumPad.

Rui Fontes


Às 14:30 de 08/03/2019, Howard Traxler escreveu:

Another problem I have is in the results of a search; should I enter a search in "this PC", the results come out in a list which I can read by down arrow.  The first down arrow tells me the file name and all its details.  When I review the line it only says the name; no details.  Any further results down the list only say the name.  I think I don't know how to read the details again and maybe even spell.  I'm just not quick enough to catch it all the first time.  As I go down the list of (sometimes) very many names, I might find one that I wish to know the location.  Can't figure it out.
On 3/8/2019 4:43 AM, Hendrik Steyn wrote:

Hi Gene


This is also how I do use NVDA's object nav and review modes. I use CMD a lot and it even works on UBUNTU CLI on windows.


Have a blessed day

Hendrik

On 3/8/2019 6:42 AM, Gene wrote:
All this doesn't teach people how to review the screen and if you are going to use the Command prompt to any extent, you need to know how. I hope those who know more about this will write more.
it appears to me that if you are in object navigation mode, you can use the regular review commands, numpad 7, 8, 9, move left by line, read current line and move right by line, to review what is on the screen.  4, 5 and 6 are left one word, current word, right one word. 1, 2, 3, are the same but by character.
If you want to move to the top of the navigator object, use shift 7. To move to the bottom, use shift 9.  In the command prompt, the entire screen is one single navigator object.  So shift 7 moves you to the top of the screen and shift 9 moves you to the bottom.
To move to the beginning of a line, use shift 1.  To move to the end, use shift 3.
I believe these commands work when expected in the DOS prompt but I've only tried them a very few times.  But all these methods of piping output to a file, while useful at times, are really often ways to get around basic knowledge of NVDA, which is useful in many contexts, not just this one.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Thursday, March 07, 2019 10:14 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Reviewing the screen, help

On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 10:40 PM, ADRIAN POCOCK wrote:

and i think there was a cmd to place it on the clipboard but its
slipped my mind.

Adrian, I was typing about redirection and append commands at the same time you wrote your message.  You are correct about the clipboard. You just use the pipe command with the word "clip" after it, e.g.,

                              dir /? | clip

and the output goes straight to the clipboard for pasting elsewhere.

--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*/A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep./*

          ~ Saul Bellow, /To Jerusalem and Back/


Re: Reviewing the screen, help

Gene
 

But what if the person wants to read screen output for other reasons in real time?  In addition, what I am discussing is basic NVDA knowledge, how to review the screen.  It may have uses for the person outside of the DOS prompt.  It is one of the early sections in the NVDA manual.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2019 8:52 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reviewing the screen, help

Hi

Well the use of redirection to either the clipboard or text file has been a mainstay since the first pc and used by most users of cmd especially those not used of it to learn, the hint was in the original post when they mentioned the use of ? after a command which gives help on that command in terms of all the switches you can use.  You can also type help > txt file to get help on using cmd.  Also you could use a text file convert it to mp3 to learn on the move.

Do not be shackled by one way or another, we are all different after all.

Regards Adrian Pocock

On 08/03/2019 04:42, Gene wrote:
All this doesn't teach people how to review the screen and if you are going to use the Command prompt to any extent, you need to know how.  I hope those who know more about this will write more. 
 
it appears to me that if you are in object navigation mode, you can use the regular review commands, numpad 7, 8, 9, move left by line, read current line and move right by line, to review what is on the screen.  4, 5 and 6 are left one word, current word, right one word.  1, 2, 3, are the same but by character. 
 
If you want to move to the top of the navigator object, use shift 7.  To move to the bottom, use shift 9.  In the command prompt, the entire screen is one single navigator object.  So shift 7 moves you to the top of the screen and shift 9 moves you to the bottom.
 
To move to the beginning of a line, use shift 1.  To move to the end, use shift 3.
 
I believe these commands work when expected in the DOS prompt but I've only tried them a very few times.  But all these methods of piping output to a file, while useful at times, are really often ways to get around basic knowledge of NVDA, which is useful in many contexts, not just this one.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2019 10:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reviewing the screen, help

On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 10:40 PM, ADRIAN POCOCK wrote:
and i think there was a cmd to place it on the clipboard but its slipped my mind.
Adrian, I was typing about redirection and append commands at the same time you wrote your message.  You are correct about the clipboard. You just use the pipe command with the word "clip" after it, e.g.,

                              dir /? | clip

and the output goes straight to the clipboard for pasting elsewhere.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Reviewing the screen, help

ADRIAN POCOCK
 

Hi

Well the use of redirection to either the clipboard or text file has been a mainstay since the first pc and used by most users of cmd especially those not used of it to learn, the hint was in the original post when they mentioned the use of ? after a command which gives help on that command in terms of all the switches you can use.  You can also type help > txt file to get help on using cmd.  Also you could use a text file convert it to mp3 to learn on the move.

Do not be shackled by one way or another, we are all different after all.

Regards Adrian Pocock

On 08/03/2019 04:42, Gene wrote:
All this doesn't teach people how to review the screen and if you are going to use the Command prompt to any extent, you need to know how.  I hope those who know more about this will write more. 
 
it appears to me that if you are in object navigation mode, you can use the regular review commands, numpad 7, 8, 9, move left by line, read current line and move right by line, to review what is on the screen.  4, 5 and 6 are left one word, current word, right one word.  1, 2, 3, are the same but by character. 
 
If you want to move to the top of the navigator object, use shift 7.  To move to the bottom, use shift 9.  In the command prompt, the entire screen is one single navigator object.  So shift 7 moves you to the top of the screen and shift 9 moves you to the bottom.
 
To move to the beginning of a line, use shift 1.  To move to the end, use shift 3.
 
I believe these commands work when expected in the DOS prompt but I've only tried them a very few times.  But all these methods of piping output to a file, while useful at times, are really often ways to get around basic knowledge of NVDA, which is useful in many contexts, not just this one.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2019 10:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reviewing the screen, help

On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 10:40 PM, ADRIAN POCOCK wrote:
and i think there was a cmd to place it on the clipboard but its slipped my mind.
Adrian, I was typing about redirection and append commands at the same time you wrote your message.  You are correct about the clipboard. You just use the pipe command with the word "clip" after it, e.g.,

                              dir /? | clip

and the output goes straight to the clipboard for pasting elsewhere.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Reviewing the screen, help

Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 

Another problem I have is in the results of a search; should I enter a search in "this PC", the results come out in a list which I can read by down arrow.  The first down arrow tells me the file name and all its details.  When I review the line it only says the name; no details.  Any further results down the list only say the name.  I think I don't know how to read the details again and maybe even spell.  I'm just not quick enough to catch it all the first time.  As I go down the list of (sometimes) very many names, I might find one that I wish to know the location.  Can't figure it out.


On 3/8/2019 4:43 AM, Hendrik Steyn wrote:

Hi Gene


This is also how I do use NVDA's object nav and review modes. I use CMD a lot and it even works on UBUNTU CLI on windows.


Have a blessed day

Hendrik

On 3/8/2019 6:42 AM, Gene wrote:
All this doesn't teach people how to review the screen and if you are going to use the Command prompt to any extent, you need to know how.  I hope those who know more about this will write more. 
 
it appears to me that if you are in object navigation mode, you can use the regular review commands, numpad 7, 8, 9, move left by line, read current line and move right by line, to review what is on the screen.  4, 5 and 6 are left one word, current word, right one word.  1, 2, 3, are the same but by character. 
 
If you want to move to the top of the navigator object, use shift 7.  To move to the bottom, use shift 9.  In the command prompt, the entire screen is one single navigator object.  So shift 7 moves you to the top of the screen and shift 9 moves you to the bottom.
 
To move to the beginning of a line, use shift 1.  To move to the end, use shift 3.
 
I believe these commands work when expected in the DOS prompt but I've only tried them a very few times.  But all these methods of piping output to a file, while useful at times, are really often ways to get around basic knowledge of NVDA, which is useful in many contexts, not just this one.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2019 10:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reviewing the screen, help

On Thu, Mar 7, 2019 at 10:40 PM, ADRIAN POCOCK wrote:
and i think there was a cmd to place it on the clipboard but its slipped my mind.
Adrian, I was typing about redirection and append commands at the same time you wrote your message.  You are correct about the clipboard. You just use the pipe command with the word "clip" after it, e.g.,

                              dir /? | clip

and the output goes straight to the clipboard for pasting elsewhere.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Converting epub to pdf

ADRIAN POCOCK
 
Edited

Hi all

It is pretty obvious they misspelt epub, which stands for electronic publication.

It all depends on copyright restrictions how you go about conversion.

If the origanal poster could enlarge what type of epub they are talking about it would be helpful.

If there is no protection on the epub file then use this link to get a conversion to pdf or audio and other formats for free.

https://www.robobraille.org/


[Moderator's Note:   The section on removing Digital Rights Management from copyrighted publications has been removed.  There are few written rules for the NVDA Group, but sites such as Groups.io and Web Forums in general frown upon any discussion of anything that attempts to violate copyright or remove legitimate copyright protections.   I will quote two forum rules from Bleeping Computer, where I also moderate, that definitely apply here:

        -   The posting of any copyrighted material on our web site is strictly prohibited.  (and that would include a verbatim text passage of the length that was posted here.  Anything beyond a line or two goes beyond fair use.  If one wishes to refer to a whole article, or close to it, post the link to it.)

       -   No subject matter will be allowed whose purpose is to defeat existing copyright or security measures. If a user persists and/or the activity is obviously illegal the staff reserves the right to remove such content and/or ban the user. 

Groups.io and similar hosting services have been known to shutter groups that persist in posting material explicitly intended to circumvent electronic copyright protections.]

 

On 08/03/2019 10:46, Antony Stone wrote:
What is an epop file?

A Google search gives me no useful-looking results.

Antony.

On Friday 08 March 2019 at 11:44:10, farhan israk wrote:

How to convert epop file to pdf file?
 


Re: Reviewing the screen, help

Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 

Thank you Marcio.  It sure does work; Although it's quite a lot of stuff to do when it used to be so easy.



On 3/7/2019 8:18 PM, marcio via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi,
I also couldn't figure out a way of reading the information presented on the screen.
As a workaround, if you want, you could try what follows:
1. Being on the prompt, press "ALT+Spacebar"
2. Up/down arrow until you find "edit" and press enter
3. Up/down arrow until you find "select all" and press enter.
You've just selected all the content which is on the screen at this point.
4. Press "ALT+Spacebar" again
5. Up/down arrow until "edit"
6. Up/down arrow until "copy".
You've just copied what you selected. Now all that content is on your clipboard.
7. Open Notepad and paste the content there so you can read.

Hth


Cheers,
Marcio AKA Starboy
Follow or add me on Facebook

Em 07/03/2019 22:58, Howard Traxler escreveu:
Hi all,


Using NVDA in Windows 10:


When I "run" the cmd command I get the system command prompt. Then I type in a command such as DIR or shutdown followed by slash question mark.  I get a screen full of command line switch options but I can't figure out how to get NVDA to read them to me. Probably one of the review modes, but I just can't figure it out. Can anyone help, please?


Thanks.

Howard