Date   
locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

Luke Davis
 

On Wed, 9 Oct 2019, Shaun Everiss wrote:

I actually like blank lines being announced when moving up and down some files.
Agreed.

I guess it could be an issue when reading a large book but you can turn the announcements of blank lines being announced in nvda preffs speech I think
anyway.
I have looked for this, twice, in all of NVDA's default settings screens, and can't find it. Can you verify please?

Luke

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

 

Luke,

            I am not going to get into a technical argument.   But it makes no sense to say that you don't process text that gets passed to a synth prior to its being passed to it.  None of the dictionaries, to my knowledge, post process text after it goes to the synth, but are used to decide what, exactly, gets passed to the synth.

            I don't even know what is referenced by "translation layer" and that may be the problem.  But the final part of the process has to be handing off that which is to be spoken to the synthesizer that speaks it.  All changes to same must occur prior to that step.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

The color of truth is grey.

           ~ André Gide

 

 

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

Luke Davis
 

On Tue, 8 Oct 2019, Brian Vogel wrote:

This conversation interests me because it seems to me that two different things are being talked about.Luke's solution uses a regular expression where the
word "blank" itself must be matched, using anchors at each end.  But the original question seems to me to be about lines that contain nothing but a return,
that is, a completely blank line, so that if someone typed line one, followed by two hits of Enter, followed by line two it would be read as, "Line one
blank blank line two," by NVDA.It does not seem to me to have anything to do with the word "blank" or its equivalent in any language, so I don't know what
I'm missing, if anything at all.
What you appear to be missing, are the dynamics of the available solutions.

Sure, if we had the option of running some kind of preprocessing filter on the text before NVDA converted it to speech, we could use a regexp like the one you suggest. But have you actually tried it? I suspect if you had, you would have found that it has no effect what so ever.
That is because we don't have that preprocessing option, short of writing an add-on for this strange purpose.

What we do have available, are speech dictionaries. But with that we have a problem, because by the time the dictionaries get applied, it's far too late in the process to even see the original text. All we get to work with is a layer between the text that is going to be sent to a synth, and the text that actually arrives at a synth.

We are doing post-processing transforms on *output* not input.

How does one tell a synth to indicate a blank line? If you just send \n, or \r\n, or their ASCII control code equivalents, it will likely say nothing. The way you (NVDA) get it to say something, is to substitute the word "blank", or the locale equivalent. So that, and only that, is what we are left with intercepting and modifying or suppressing.

Now using the regular expression:  ^\s*$with nothing substituted for it should find any line that is blank, whether it's just someone having hit Enter, or any whitespace character followed by enter, and would say nothing if that's found.
Of course, if we were able to preprocess the text before NVDA's translation layers got their hooks into it, but we can't.

If the literal word "blank" were to
appear all by its lonesome on a single line it would be read, correctly, as blank.One would definitely not want to be using this method when proofreading
something written in a text editor, as you'd never know if you'd put in paragraph breaks or how many times you'd hit enter when trying to create vertical
separation.
To be clear, I was answering the question, not stating an opinion on the advisability of doing this. Which opinion is: don't, it's not worth it. But hey, to each his own.

Luke

Re: NVDA and the application key

Kevin Cussick
 

Hi, well put thanks.

On 08/10/2019 17:26, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Oct 7, 2019 at 11:29 PM, Jaffar Sidek wrote:
These are, they are causing concerns and problems to some if not
most Windows users.
It definitely is not most, and that's precisely the point.
You, and many others like you, always want to lay the problem at Microsoft's feet, and sometimes it deserves to be lain at Microsoft's feet, but just as often it does not.  I have said it before, and will say it as many times as it takes to get through, */Most Computer Issues Are Idiosyncratic – Not Global./* <https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/692669/malwarebytes-unable-to-access-update-server/#entry4729918> Even the articles you gave reference to acknowledge that it's a very small portion of the user base as a whole that's experiencing issues.  In this day and age, with the amount of "old hardware" that has been updated to Windows 10 that was built long before it was ever released and for which it was never designed, I full well expect there will be issues, and issues it's impossible for Microsoft or any other company to test for because no major corporation is going to try to source long out of production hardware for testing their latest releases.
Also, Kim Komando gives yet another bit of garbage advice in her article.  The patch in question is not a Feature Update, so the *Go back to the previous version of Windows 10* option will not even be available, and would be like using a flame thrower to light a candle if it were.  "Advice you can trust," my derrière; this woman is the biggest anti-Windows whiner out there, and consistently so.  One does not have to be a Microsoft fanboy/fangirl to recognize that, either.
If you're expecting perfection of any OS then I suggest you find us one that has it, as I've never encountered one in 35 plus years in computing.  Include never having a patch update that has an unexpected side effect in that criteria of perfection, too.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362
*The color of truth is grey.*
           ~ André Gide

Re: NVDA and the application key

Kevin Cussick
 

Have you ran the registration com fixing tool in Nvda? this might fix things, once you have ran this reboot your computer and it should just work.

On 07/10/2019 22:58, Manoj Govindraj wrote:
Actually it happens all across the board and in all the programs that I open. When I press the application key, NVDA does not even say context menu, let alone saying any of the options present in that menu.
Best,
Manoj
http://www.swar-ras.com
On Oct 7, 2019, at 4:56 PM, hurrikennyandopo ... <hurrikennyandopo@... <mailto:hurrikennyandopo@...>> wrote:

Hi


Is it happening any where else? for example down on the running application part of the task bar it should speak them Have you noticed it doing it any where else?

Or is it just saying unknown? or are they been spoken out.


Gene nz


On 8/10/2019 9:28 AM, Manoj Govindraj wrote:
Hi Friends, Lately NVDA is not announcing the options for me when I press the Application key. I have the latest update of NVDA installed on my windows 10 64 bit pc. Best, Manoj
--
Image NVDA certified expert
Check out my website for NVDA tutorials and other blindness related materials at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net

To find out which library networks in New Zealand have a copy of the NVDA screen reader on them and there library locations please go to http://www.accessibilitycentral.net/nz%20libraries%20with%20nvda.html
To find a NVDA certified expert near you, please visit the following link https://certification.nvaccess.org/. The certification page contains the official list of NVDA certified individuals from around the world, who have sat and successfully passed the NVDA expert exam.

Re: Crash in Outlook 365

Daniel Gartmann
 

This apparently fixed the problem. Thanks.


-----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
Fra: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> På vegne af Lukasz Golonka
Sendt: 4. oktober 2019 20:54
Til: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Emne: Re: [nvda] Crash in Outlook 365

Hello,


On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 12:39:02 +0000
"Daniel Gartmann" <dgartmann@...> wrote:


Hi,

When e.g. composing a reply in Outlook 365, I often can't Tab or Shift+Tab into the body of the message that I am typing.

For me, this is quite serious, since when this happens, I cannot continue typing my e-mail and have to switch to another screen reader to get the job done.

Until I find the time to create an issue on GitHub, I take the liberty to post a segment from the log file and hope this makes sense. I would appreciate any further comments or questions if the issue needs further investigation:
Is there any particular reason why you have enabled UIA for Microsoft Word in advanced settings? I am not Outlook uuser myself, but if you do not need this it might be worth disabling it for the time being, and check if it would improve things.

--
Regards
|Lukasz

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

Roger Stewart
 

The best way to get around this is to just use the read to end command which is the NVDA key plus down arrow on the 6 pack of keys. It never says blank no matter how many blank lines are in the message.  You really want to hear it say blank when you are arrowing down line by line as it is assumed you are reviewing the message for close correction purposes and you'd need to hear that. Just casual reading with the read to end will do what you want.
Roger








On 10/8/2019 3:03 PM, Ralf Kefferpuetz wrote:

That’s what Luke was speaking about, a line with just a return. When you arrow through those messages I hear “blank” for a blank line and Luke’s suggestion eleminates that.

 

Cheers,

  Ralf

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Dienstag, 8. Oktober 2019 20:57
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] blank line reading by NVDA

 

This conversation interests me because it seems to me that two different things are being talked about.

Luke's solution uses a regular expression where the word "blank" itself must be matched, using anchors at each end.  But the original question seems to me to be about lines that contain nothing but a return, that is, a completely blank line, so that if someone typed line one, followed by two hits of Enter, followed by line two it would be read as, "Line one blank blank line two," by NVDA.

It does not seem to me to have anything to do with the word "blank" or its equivalent in any language, so I don't know what I'm missing, if anything at all.

Now using the regular expression:  ^\s*$
with nothing substituted for it should find any line that is blank, whether it's just someone having hit Enter, or any whitespace character followed by enter, and would say nothing if that's found.

If the literal word "blank" were to appear all by its lonesome on a single line it would be read, correctly, as blank.

One would definitely not want to be using this method when proofreading something written in a text editor, as you'd never know if you'd put in paragraph breaks or how many times you'd hit enter when trying to create vertical separation.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

The color of truth is grey.

           ~ André Gide

 

 


locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

Ralf Kefferpuetz
 

That’s what Luke was speaking about, a line with just a return. When you arrow through those messages I hear “blank” for a blank line and Luke’s suggestion eleminates that.

 

Cheers,

  Ralf

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Dienstag, 8. Oktober 2019 20:57
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] blank line reading by NVDA

 

This conversation interests me because it seems to me that two different things are being talked about.

Luke's solution uses a regular expression where the word "blank" itself must be matched, using anchors at each end.  But the original question seems to me to be about lines that contain nothing but a return, that is, a completely blank line, so that if someone typed line one, followed by two hits of Enter, followed by line two it would be read as, "Line one blank blank line two," by NVDA.

It does not seem to me to have anything to do with the word "blank" or its equivalent in any language, so I don't know what I'm missing, if anything at all.

Now using the regular expression:  ^\s*$
with nothing substituted for it should find any line that is blank, whether it's just someone having hit Enter, or any whitespace character followed by enter, and would say nothing if that's found.

If the literal word "blank" were to appear all by its lonesome on a single line it would be read, correctly, as blank.

One would definitely not want to be using this method when proofreading something written in a text editor, as you'd never know if you'd put in paragraph breaks or how many times you'd hit enter when trying to create vertical separation.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

The color of truth is grey.

           ~ André Gide

 

 

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

 

The ways to get round this are as follows.

1.  for a book balabolka can convert it to mp3 for you using tts.

Pros it gets rid of the issues.

Cons you get a huge file with no way to keep your place except for pause or marking places in.

You could convert it to daisy I guess but still.

And if your tts is no good you have an issue.

At any rate I have listened to a book read by tts and its not as good as a human reading it.

2.  convert it to an epub and have you read it with your epub or other daisy reader.

Again overkill but you can do it.

Finally if you do have a daisy player and most of you guys should have something, at least most if not all blind people that are members of a library or something for your spaciffic blindness organisation will have access to some sort of player.

That can read text files and can keep place in those automatically.

They will ignore blank lines and I often do this for big books.

They also have good tts but again that is tts.

You could also try to get audio books but they cost more than text and can be bigger again.

The issue of long documents well you may have to put up with it.



On 9/10/2019 7:56 am, Brian Vogel wrote:
This conversation interests me because it seems to me that two different things are being talked about.

Luke's solution uses a regular expression where the word "blank" itself must be matched, using anchors at each end.  But the original question seems to me to be about lines that contain nothing but a return, that is, a completely blank line, so that if someone typed line one, followed by two hits of Enter, followed by line two it would be read as, "Line one blank blank line two," by NVDA.

It does not seem to me to have anything to do with the word "blank" or its equivalent in any language, so I don't know what I'm missing, if anything at all.

Now using the regular expression:  ^\s*$
with nothing substituted for it should find any line that is blank, whether it's just someone having hit Enter, or any whitespace character followed by enter, and would say nothing if that's found.

If the literal word "blank" were to appear all by its lonesome on a single line it would be read, correctly, as blank.

One would definitely not want to be using this method when proofreading something written in a text editor, as you'd never know if you'd put in paragraph breaks or how many times you'd hit enter when trying to create vertical separation.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

The color of truth is grey.

           ~ André Gide

 

 

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

 

I actually like blank lines being announced when moving up and down some files.

For me with a training diary I write the only thing I use a wordprocesser for and even then notepad, I actually want to know that information.

I guess it could be an issue when reading a large book but you can turn the announcements of blank lines being announced in nvda preffs speech I think anyway.

I guess when reading a big book in say all you may not want this.

But there are ways round that if you get really concerned about it.



On 9/10/2019 7:56 am, Brian Vogel wrote:
This conversation interests me because it seems to me that two different things are being talked about.

Luke's solution uses a regular expression where the word "blank" itself must be matched, using anchors at each end.  But the original question seems to me to be about lines that contain nothing but a return, that is, a completely blank line, so that if someone typed line one, followed by two hits of Enter, followed by line two it would be read as, "Line one blank blank line two," by NVDA.

It does not seem to me to have anything to do with the word "blank" or its equivalent in any language, so I don't know what I'm missing, if anything at all.

Now using the regular expression:  ^\s*$
with nothing substituted for it should find any line that is blank, whether it's just someone having hit Enter, or any whitespace character followed by enter, and would say nothing if that's found.

If the literal word "blank" were to appear all by its lonesome on a single line it would be read, correctly, as blank.

One would definitely not want to be using this method when proofreading something written in a text editor, as you'd never know if you'd put in paragraph breaks or how many times you'd hit enter when trying to create vertical separation.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

The color of truth is grey.

           ~ André Gide

 

 

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

 

This conversation interests me because it seems to me that two different things are being talked about.

Luke's solution uses a regular expression where the word "blank" itself must be matched, using anchors at each end.  But the original question seems to me to be about lines that contain nothing but a return, that is, a completely blank line, so that if someone typed line one, followed by two hits of Enter, followed by line two it would be read as, "Line one blank blank line two," by NVDA.

It does not seem to me to have anything to do with the word "blank" or its equivalent in any language, so I don't know what I'm missing, if anything at all.

Now using the regular expression:  ^\s*$
with nothing substituted for it should find any line that is blank, whether it's just someone having hit Enter, or any whitespace character followed by enter, and would say nothing if that's found.

If the literal word "blank" were to appear all by its lonesome on a single line it would be read, correctly, as blank.

One would definitely not want to be using this method when proofreading something written in a text editor, as you'd never know if you'd put in paragraph breaks or how many times you'd hit enter when trying to create vertical separation.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

The color of truth is grey.

           ~ André Gide

 

 

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

Ralf Kefferpuetz
 

Hmm, works perfectly for me, as Luke described.

Cheers,
Ralf

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of zahra
Sent: Dienstag, 8. Oktober 2019 19:50
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] blank line reading by NVDA

i did it, and nvda just says blank line in one of your email.
i wish that not hear blank line, not in the time that i type blank.
when i type blank and press space, nvda just says space!

On 10/8/19, Luke Davis <luke@...> wrote:
The only apparent way to silence this, is to create a (default)
dictionary entry for this regular expression, which you should write
in all lower
case:

^blank$

Note the punctuation there.

This is the English word. If using another language, substitute
accordingly.

Don't write anything in the replacement field.

Select the checkbox for case sensitive, and be sure to change from
"anywhere" to "regular expression".

Note: if you come across somewhere that only has the word "blank" on a
line by itself, you won't hear it.
That is the side effect of using this method.

Luke

On Tue, 8 Oct 2019, zahra wrote:

when i use arrow keys, nvda reads blank lines and i wish to find a
solution for it, but i did not.

On 10/8/19, Afik Souffir <afik.souffir@...> wrote:


Ok, and if I read with the arrorss?







מאת: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> בשם Quentin
Christensen
נשלח: יום ג 08 אוקטובר 2019 11:33
אל: nvda@nvda.groups.io
נושא: Re: [nvda] blank line reading by NVDA



If you read with NVDA+Down arrow (or if using laptop keyboard
layout,
NVDA+a) it won't report all the blank lines.



On Tue, Oct 8, 2019 at 6:36 PM Afik Souffir <afik.souffir@...
<mailto:afik.souffir@...> > wrote:



Hi,



My name is Afik, from Israel, I’m almost 21 years old.



I want to ask, how can I stop NVDA to read or show in braille blank
lines, such in emails, websites, or other platforms?



Thanks



Afik Souffir










--

Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



Web: <http://www.nvaccess.org/> www.nvaccess.org

Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/

User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess <https://twitter.com/NVAccess>







--
Luke Davis
Moderator: the new NVDA Help mailing list!
(https://groups.io/g/NVDAHelp)
Author: Debug Helper NVDA add-on
(https://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/debugHelper.en.html)




--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali

locked Re: blank line reading by NVDA

 

i did it, and nvda just says blank line in one of your email.
i wish that not hear blank line, not in the time that i type blank.
when i type blank and press space, nvda just says space!

On 10/8/19, Luke Davis <luke@...> wrote:
The only apparent way to silence this, is to create a (default) dictionary
entry for this regular expression, which you should write in all lower
case:

^blank$

Note the punctuation there.

This is the English word. If using another language, substitute
accordingly.

Don't write anything in the replacement field.

Select the checkbox for case sensitive, and be sure to change from
"anywhere" to
"regular expression".

Note: if you come across somewhere that only has the word "blank" on a line
by
itself, you won't hear it.
That is the side effect of using this method.

Luke

On Tue, 8 Oct 2019, zahra wrote:

when i use arrow keys, nvda reads blank lines and i wish to find a
solution for it, but i did not.

On 10/8/19, Afik Souffir <afik.souffir@...> wrote:


Ok, and if I read with the arrorss?







מאת: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> בשם Quentin Christensen
נשלח: יום ג 08 אוקטובר 2019 11:33
אל: nvda@nvda.groups.io
נושא: Re: [nvda] blank line reading by NVDA



If you read with NVDA+Down arrow (or if using laptop keyboard layout,
NVDA+a) it won't report all the blank lines.



On Tue, Oct 8, 2019 at 6:36 PM Afik Souffir <afik.souffir@...
<mailto:afik.souffir@...> > wrote:



Hi,



My name is Afik, from Israel, I’m almost 21 years old.



I want to ask, how can I stop NVDA to read or show in braille blank
lines,
such in emails, websites, or other platforms?



Thanks



Afik Souffir










--

Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



Web: <http://www.nvaccess.org/> www.nvaccess.org

Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/

User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess <https://twitter.com/NVAccess>







--
Luke Davis
Moderator: the new NVDA Help mailing list! (https://groups.io/g/NVDAHelp)
Author: Debug Helper NVDA add-on
(https://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/debugHelper.en.html)



--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali

Re: NVDA and the application key

 

On Mon, Oct 7, 2019 at 11:29 PM, Jaffar Sidek wrote:
These are, they are causing concerns and problems to some if not most Windows users.
It definitely is not most, and that's precisely the point.

You, and many others like you, always want to lay the problem at Microsoft's feet, and sometimes it deserves to be lain at Microsoft's feet, but just as often it does not.  I have said it before, and will say it as many times as it takes to get through, Most Computer Issues Are Idiosyncratic – Not Global.  Even the articles you gave reference to acknowledge that it's a very small portion of the user base as a whole that's experiencing issues.   In this day and age, with the amount of "old hardware" that has been updated to Windows 10 that was built long before it was ever released and for which it was never designed, I full well expect there will be issues, and issues it's impossible for Microsoft or any other company to test for because no major corporation is going to try to source long out of production hardware for testing their latest releases.

Also, Kim Komando gives yet another bit of garbage advice in her article.  The patch in question is not a Feature Update, so the  Go back to the previous version of Windows 10 option will not even be available, and would be like using a flame thrower to light a candle if it were.  "Advice you can trust," my derrière; this woman is the biggest anti-Windows whiner out there, and consistently so.  One does not have to be a Microsoft fanboy/fangirl to recognize that, either.

If you're expecting perfection of any OS then I suggest you find us one that has it, as I've never encountered one in 35 plus years in computing.  Include never having a patch update that has an unexpected side effect in that criteria of perfection, too.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

The color of truth is grey.

           ~ André Gide

 

 

Re: NVDA and the application key

Sarah k Alawami
 

Actually for me I have to do it twice to bring up the text field for some odd reason. It's strange you don't have to do that as twice brings up the edit field and once for me at least does nothing. Maybe it takes a snap? I dunno.

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website. This is also our libsyn page as well.
For stuff we sell, mac training materials and  tutorials go here.
and for hosting options go here
to subscribe to the feed click here

Our telegram channel is also a good place for an announce only in regard to podcasts, contests, etc.

Our discord is where you will know when we go live on youtube, twitch and mixer. Thanks Restream staff.

Finally, to become a patron and help support the podcast go here

On 8 Oct 2019, at 3:31, Luke Davis wrote:

On Mon, 7 Oct 2019, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

Can you send a log to the list when you get this to happen? Hit nvda plus. f1 twice ad copy the text to the clipboard and paste it in a reply to this
message.

There is no value in pressing NVDA+F1 twice. Once is sufficient.

Luke

Re: Directing NVDA output to a particular audio device

Robert Doc Wright godfearer
 

Luke, all you need to do is open change sound card settings. Choose one sound card as the default card. Then open NVDA’s synthesizer option and point it to the other sound card.

 

******If we can't look at ourselves, and ask, why?  then where does the learning start?***     

 

From: Kevin Cussick via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, October 7, 2019 3:09 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Directing NVDA output to a particular audio device

 

correct,   you have it it will work.

 

On 07/10/2019 20:40, Luke Davis wrote:

> On Sun, 6 Oct 2019, Gene wrote:

>

>> If you want the NVDA audio to go through the USB soundcard, you would

>> set NVDA to use that sound card.  This is done within NVDA itself.

>> But I don't know how you direct the other audio to use the original

>> internal sound card.  Others would have to answer that.  I've never

>> tried such a

>> setting.

>

> Would you not just set the internal card as the Windows default?

>

> I have certainly done the opposite before: set a USB card as Windows

> default, and set NVDA to use the internal card, so I don't see why the

> inverse wouldn't work.

>

> Luke

>

>

>

 

 

 

Re: using screen layout

David Csercsics
 

I've gotten used to the screen  layout. At least for braille it works well. Are there instances where it's better to have things on their own line? I've always wondered how the custom formatting of things for screen readers is supposed to help. It seems like it's unnecessary processing, possibly.

Re: using screen layout

Nimer Jaber
 

For me, if each link is on its own line, it takes more key presses to get through a page if I am trying to read it with arrow keys.

Thanks.

On Tue, Oct 8, 2019 at 2:41 AM Vincent Le Goff <vincent.legoff.srs@...> wrote:

Having, sometimes, several links on the same line feels more natural to me.  And even at times I regret this doesn't go farther: showing horizontal lists of links horizontally instead of always vertically for instance.  I got used to moving around a line with multiple links.  Having every link on a separate line makes the page seem bigger and navigation more difficult, and reading less comfortable (like in a Wikipedia article).  But that's obviously a personal preference.  I don't think toggling this setting on or off has much impact on performance, since it's handled by the screen reader at the last possible moment.  At least, that's my impression.


HTH,


Vincent

On 10/8/2019 2:34 AM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

I use screen layout all the time as I get to learn the layout of the pge. It's not always ideal but I've gotten used to it.

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On 7 Oct 2019, at 17:21, Gene wrote:

Screen layout means that, at times, where you would see only one link per line if screen layout is off, if it is on, you may see two or more links on a line.
 
There are places, such as in some user forums, where it may be useful to see material in this way.  I think that, in general browsing, it is better to see each link on its own line.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Don H
Sent: Monday, October 07, 2019 7:13 PM
Subject: [nvda] using screen layout

Under browser settings there a setting for using Screen layout.  For
overall performance with both Google Chrome and Firefox should this
setting be enabled?
Thanks





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Re: NVDA and the application key

Luke Davis
 

I know a likely answer to this has been found, but just to be sure, have you run the COM Registration Fixing Tool (NVDA menu -> Tools)?

It probably won't help, but it won't hurt either.

Luke

On Mon, 7 Oct 2019, Manoj Govindraj wrote:

Actually it happens all across the board and in all the programs that I open. When I press the application key, NVDA does not even say context menu, let
alone saying any of the options present in that menu.

Re: NVDA and the application key

Luke Davis
 

On Mon, 7 Oct 2019, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

Can you send a log to the list when you get this to happen? Hit nvda plus. f1 twice ad copy the text to the clipboard and paste it in a reply to this
message.
There is no value in pressing NVDA+F1 twice. Once is sufficient.

Luke