Date   

BrowserNav Add-on Beeping

Richard Wells
 

Earlier, I reported that I was getting beeping on web pages as I
navigate on them. I disabled BrowserNav as someone suggested and the
problem went away. So far, I have not found anything that looks like a
toggle for this preference. I love the add-on and will accept the
side-effect of using it, but I would love to see a feature that would
allow me to disable this behavior in the future. Thanks for all the
feedback I got on this.


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

That's true.

On 2/7/2021 12:27 PM, Gene wrote:
Neither does Start Page.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2021 1:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification



Duckduckgo is really good too because they don't track you.







On 2/7/2021 10:00 AM, Monte Single wrote:


I have not refined my searchskills much, but I have found that using startpage instead of google cuts out a lot of garbage and I usually find what I need in the first half dozen links.





From: nvda@nvda.groups.io mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification





On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:



It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.



-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://)/ and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

It has Donald Duck--hahahahahahaha. Couldn't resist that one.



On 2/7/2021 12:57 PM, Monte Single wrote:

 

 

Duckduckgo!Does it come with cartoons?

Sorry,

 

Monte

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: February 7, 2021 1:54 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

Duckduckgo is really good too because they don't track you.

 

 

On 2/7/2021 10:00 AM, Monte Single wrote:

I have not refined my searchskills much, but I have found that using startpage instead of google cuts out a lot of garbage and I usually find what I need in the first half dozen links.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:

It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.

-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://) and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Monte Single
 

 

 

Duckduckgo!Does it come with cartoons?

Sorry,

 

Monte

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: February 7, 2021 1:54 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

Duckduckgo is really good too because they don't track you.

 

 

On 2/7/2021 10:00 AM, Monte Single wrote:

I have not refined my searchskills much, but I have found that using startpage instead of google cuts out a lot of garbage and I usually find what I need in the first half dozen links.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:

It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.

-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://) and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Gene
 

I was thinking about different search engines and an important advantage may be that Start Page and Duck Duck go (spelling), since they don't track you, may not try to tailor results. You may get a broader representation of results that don't trap you in an information bubble. If you research a political subject, for example, you may see more sites with more differing opinions.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2021 2:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

Neither does Start Page.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2021 1:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification



Duckduckgo is really good too because they don't track you.







On 2/7/2021 10:00 AM, Monte Single wrote:


I have not refined my searchskills much, but I have found that using
startpage instead of google cuts out a lot of garbage and I usually find
what I need in the first half dozen links.





From: nvda@nvda.groups.io mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io On Behalf Of Brian
Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification





On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:



It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of
Google searches or other good search engine searches.



-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021,
is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the
first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not
often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a
world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here,
is the site: operator. While, like any search term, it can be stuck
anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the
beginning or the end. If you only wanted to search for something at
NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the
word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://)/ and you
will be searching only that website for content. You can even get more
specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the
NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single
website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds
of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns,
that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes
how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as
most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced
options on the Advanced Search page. There are also more tutorials that you
can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval
can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

~ Brian Vogel


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Gene
 

Neither does Start Page.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2021 1:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification



Duckduckgo is really good too because they don't track you.







On 2/7/2021 10:00 AM, Monte Single wrote:


I have not refined my searchskills much, but I have found that using startpage instead of google cuts out a lot of garbage and I usually find what I need in the first half dozen links.





From: nvda@nvda.groups.io mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification





On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:



It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.



-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator. While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end. If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://)/ and you will be searching only that website for content. You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page. There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

~ Brian Vogel


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Gene
 

I haven't used Start Page enough to compare in many ways. I know that Start Page uses Google for its searches and that it doesn't track you. What I don't know is if there are features or abilities Google has that Start Page doesn't. for example, Google is very good at correcting spellings which makes searching very convenient. Sometimes, a spell checker won't know what I'm misspelling, but Google does. If a spell checker offers no suggestions, I may check the word on Google. The same with proper names I want to know how to spell.

Also, Google has very convenient features like web snippets and people also ask.

I don't search when I'm signed into Google because it makes it less likely Google will know who is searching, in terms of my identity.

I don't see a serious problem with what you are calling garbage. I simply use h from the top of the page and quickly go down to web results, if that's what I want to look at, which is a heading. From there, I continue by heading.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2021 12:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification



, I find Start page is just as good as google. You don’t get advertising. I prefer start page as my search engine. I tell everybody Iknow I is a good search engine.



Sent from Mail for Windows 10





From: Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 8:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification





On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:



It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.



-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator. While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end. If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://)/ and you will be searching only that website for content. You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page. There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

~ Brian Vogel


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Duckduckgo is really good too because they don't track you.



On 2/7/2021 10:00 AM, Monte Single wrote:

I have not refined my searchskills much, but I have found that using startpage instead of google cuts out a lot of garbage and I usually find what I need in the first half dozen links.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:

It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.

-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://) and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: NVDA User Guide doesn't open in default browser

Louise Pfau
 

Hi.  I've just installed NVDA 2020.4 beta 4, and the user guide now opens correctly in Edge, which is my default browser.  I know this is completely idiosyncratic.

Thanks,

Louise


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

I've used startpage before and it is really good.



On 2/7/2021 10:34 AM, Arlene wrote:

, I find Start page is just as good as google. You don’t get advertising. I prefer start page as my search engine. I tell everybody Iknow I is a good search engine.  

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 8:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:

It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.

-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://) and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 

 


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

 

I have not used Google in years as my primary search engine.  I like DuckDuckGo, and StartPage is an equally good alternative for those who prefer it.

The search operator syntax has been pretty largely consistent across different search engines.  So if you did learn for Google, what you're used to is very likely to be used with whatever search engine it is you now prefer.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Arlene
 

, I find Start page is just as good as google. You don’t get advertising. I prefer start page as my search engine. I tell everybody Iknow I is a good search engine.  

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 8:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:

It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.

-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://) and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 

 


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Monte Single
 

I have not refined my searchskills much, but I have found that using startpage instead of google cuts out a lot of garbage and I usually find what I need in the first half dozen links.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 7, 2021 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:

It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.

-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://) and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:00 AM, Gene wrote:
It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.
-
Amen to that!

I have preached, repeatedly, that knowing how to do a web search, in 2021, is a basic skill, and if you don't have it then acquiring it is one of the first things you should be trying to do.

And the range of search operators for any search engine is wide (and not often necessary to deal with, I might add) and allows you to drill through a world of data with almost laser-like focus.

One of the operators I do use with some frequency, and which applies here, is the site: operator.  While, like any search term, it can be stuck anywhere in a list of search criteria I generally place it either at the beginning or the end.  If you only wanted to search for something at NVAccess then adding the search term site:nvaccess.org (no spaces, just the word site, the colon, and the website sans any need for http://) and you will be searching only that website for content.  You can even get more specific, such that if you only wanted to search the News portion of the NVAccess site, you would put, site:nvaccess.org/news.

That one operator, when you know that you only want content from a single website or some sub-segment of that site, will eliminate possibly hundreds of thousands of extraneous results.

Google has a great Advanced Search page, with fillable edit boxes/dropdowns, that tells you (if it's accessible) right after all of those fill-in boxes how you can do the same thing in a regular Google Search using operators, as most of us will never come close to combining all of the potential advanced options on the Advanced Search page.  There are also more tutorials that you can shake a stick at regarding Google Search operators and how to use them.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Beeping on Web Pages using Chrome

 

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 10:42 AM, Aravind R wrote:
its due to brouser nav nvda add on which i found out just now.
-
And this is precisely why one of the earliest steps in doing "issue related" debugging is restarting NVDA with add-ons disabled.  It's simple to do, and if the issue vanishes then you have confirmation that it's with an add-on, not NVDA itself.

Then, depending on how many add-ons you have, you go through the process of disabling them all in add-ons manager, then re-enabling them either one at a time (if you have only a couple) or in groups until the issue reappears.  If you were doing one-by-one reenabling, you instantly know your culprit.  If you were doing groups, you know the group it's in, disable those all again, and reenable one-by-one to find out which one in the group is the culprit.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Beeping on Web Pages using Chrome

Richard Wells
 

It sounds like a progress beep, but it is not. As I arrow on the page,
especially one with tables, I can hear either ascending or descending
beeps depending on which direction I am navigating.

On 2/6/2021 9:39 PM, hurrikennyandopo ... wrote:
Hi is it a back ground progress sound . Under object navigation the
following might be turned on called Report background progress bars.

Try unchecking that and see what happens.


The toggle to turn of beeps is the nvda key + letter u which will do
sounds as in beeps, speak or off.



Are you using a alfa or beta of nvda you will get beeps there on the
page if it comes across problems but if keeps on going do not worry.



I thought there might of been a setting if you were using audio themes
but there is only one when the page loads.



Gene nz


Are you using a program that tells you when the page is loaded with
sounds..



On 7/02/2021 4:23 pm, Richard Wells wrote:
No, it is not a download. It only occurs when I am navigating on web
pages.

On 2/6/2021 9:21 PM, Blaster wrote:
Hi Richard,  This sounds like it would be aggravating,   Have you
pressed the CTRL key and tapped the letter J key to see if there's
something trying to download or re-download  in this list of your
downloaded files?

HTH,
Blaster

On 2/6/21, Richard Wells <richwels@gmx.com> wrote:
Hi: on only one of my computers,I am hearing what sound like progress
beeps as I navigate in the virtual buffer on web pages. Any idea
what I
may have turned on in preferences. I have lots of add-ons, so I don't
really know where to start finding what I've changed. I am sure I
did it
but I just cannot figure out how to diagnose it. Thanks for any ideas
you all may have.














Re: Beeping on Web Pages using Chrome

Aravind R
 

its due to brouser nav nvda add on which i found out just now.
after removing that, this problem is gone.
I will re-install that add on and see whats the exact issue.

On 07/02/2021, Aravind R via groups.io
<aravind.andhrabank=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
its coming in windows10 only. in win7 in my office this issue is not there.

On 07/02/2021, Giles Turnbull <giles.turnbull@gmail.com> wrote:
I think I've experienced the beeping you're experiencing, but not for
quite
a while. I was using Firefox rather than Chrome but every time I moved
down
the page with the down cursor, I'd get periodic single beeps. I don't
think
it was every line, it was as if it was beeping to indicate I was a certin
percentage far down the page. I think the pitch changed, getting lower as
I
navigated down the page and then higher if I arrowed back up the page.

It was not every website,just some and, annoyingly, I can't remember
which!

I did a quick search of the NVDA group for the term "beeping" because I
couldn't remember if I discussed it here. Apparently I didn't, but there
are
a couple of possible related discussions about beeping when navigating a
webpage. The topic I posted about beeping was only to do with hearing the
progress beeps of some downloads, which isn't relevant to your situation.

The only thing I can add is that I haven't heard it since probably 2019
and,
assuming the beeping doesn't ever return for me, it wasn't an NVDA
setting
that stopped it. It was likely a website that I've not visited since ...
something like a post on the Medium blogging platform or something.

Giles






--


--
--
nothing is difficult unless you make it appear so.

r. aravind,

manager
Department of sales
bank of baroda specialised mortgage store, Chennai.
mobile no: +91 9940369593,
email id : aravind_069@yahoo.com, aravind.andhrabank@gmail.com.
aravind.rajendran@bankofbaroda.co.in.






--


--
--
nothing is difficult unless you make it appear so.

r. aravind,

manager
Department of sales
bank of baroda specialised mortgage store, Chennai.
mobile no: +91 9940369593,
email id : aravind_069@yahoo.com, aravind.andhrabank@gmail.com.
aravind.rajendran@bankofbaroda.co.in.


Re: Beeping on Web Pages using Chrome

Aravind R
 

its coming in windows10 only. in win7 in my office this issue is not there.

On 07/02/2021, Giles Turnbull <giles.turnbull@gmail.com> wrote:
I think I've experienced the beeping you're experiencing, but not for quite
a while. I was using Firefox rather than Chrome but every time I moved down
the page with the down cursor, I'd get periodic single beeps. I don't think
it was every line, it was as if it was beeping to indicate I was a certin
percentage far down the page. I think the pitch changed, getting lower as I
navigated down the page and then higher if I arrowed back up the page.

It was not every website,just some and, annoyingly, I can't remember which!

I did a quick search of the NVDA group for the term "beeping" because I
couldn't remember if I discussed it here. Apparently I didn't, but there are
a couple of possible related discussions about beeping when navigating a
webpage. The topic I posted about beeping was only to do with hearing the
progress beeps of some downloads, which isn't relevant to your situation.

The only thing I can add is that I haven't heard it since probably 2019 and,
assuming the beeping doesn't ever return for me, it wasn't an NVDA setting
that stopped it. It was likely a website that I've not visited since ...
something like a post on the Medium blogging platform or something.

Giles






--


--
--
nothing is difficult unless you make it appear so.

r. aravind,

manager
Department of sales
bank of baroda specialised mortgage store, Chennai.
mobile no: +91 9940369593,
email id : aravind_069@yahoo.com, aravind.andhrabank@gmail.com.
aravind.rajendran@bankofbaroda.co.in.


Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Gene
 

He and others may be more inclined to in future. I don't know what the situation is now, I haven't looked at the NVDA site in any detail for quite some time, but in the past, it often was much easier to find things using Google. Even if the site was wonderfully organized, it often would be significantly faster, as it is in many other instances to use Google than to go to a site and then search it, especially when Google is a very familiar interface and the site you are going to may not be.

If I want to find out about an add-on, I do a search for the add-on, for example, additional NVDA voices. Google is smart enough to find the page even though the actual word used is extra voices on the page. I just tried searching for additional NVDA synthesizers. Google is smart enough to show the voices page.

It is unfortunate that so many people are unaware of the power and value of Google searches or other good search engine searches.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Smart
Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2021 8:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] A quick question about NVDA certification

Darn, I was hoping he could find that on his own, with Google.


But yes, everything is explained there.



On 2021-02-07 8:09 a.m., Gene wrote:

I forgot to include the link.

https://certification.nvaccess.org/



Re: A quick question about NVDA certification

Chris Smart
 

Darn, I was hoping he could find that on his own, with Google.


But yes, everything is explained there.

On 2021-02-07 8:09 a.m., Gene wrote:

I forgot to include  the link.

https://certification.nvaccess.org/


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