Date   

Re: right clicking

Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

Oops, inadvertantly deleted the original topic in my email instead of
moving it to the inbox so had to use the web interface, and thought it
was quoting Brian's message asking why people don't use a real mouse
covering the port.

On 3/1/21, Bob Cavanaugh via groups.io <cavbob1993=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
In my case, I've never thought to do that until you pointed it out on this
list for the first time a month or so ago. Before that, I had learned that
right click usually meant pressing the applications key, and I'm not sure
I've ever needed a left click. When I do need help with something such as my
problem with browse dialogs from a couple weeks ago, it's because I cannot
access the element in question with usual screen reader commands.






Number formatting in Google Docs

Jonathan Milam
 

Hi All,


Is anyone else seeing an issue where, while in Google docs, NVDA no longer reads letters or numbers in lists?  Several months ago, this worked as expected, but NVDA just now says list for everything in a list, without reading the associated letters and numbers.  I even went back to previous versions of NVDA from last year and still can’t get them to read.  For some reason, Narrator reads them without a problem.


Thanks,

Jonathan

 


Re: right clicking

Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

In my case, I've never thought to do that until you pointed it out on this list for the first time a month or so ago. Before that, I had learned that right click usually meant pressing the applications key, and I'm not sure I've ever needed a left click. When I do need help with something such as my problem with browse dialogs from a couple weeks ago, it's because I cannot access the element in question with usual screen reader commands.


Question about NVDA core functionality

Louise Pfau
 

Hi.  I know that add-on updater and some parts of Windows 10 app essentials will be added to NVDA core functionality in a future release.  Is it possible, or feasible to treat add-ons like clipspeak in the same way?  When I'm using NVDA on someone else's computer, I only use the core functionality because I'm using an installed copy rather than a portable one.

Thanks,

Louise.


Re: right clicking

 

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 12:07 PM, Arlene wrote:
What’s a prepared Mouse?
-
Described two messages back:  https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda/message/82242 

This is why I ask that folks read through an entire topic before replying.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Re: right clicking

Arlene
 

What’s a prepared Mouse? Before I moved to this small town. I had a bigger desk and a wireless mouse. I used it with NVDA Then I clicked whatever I needed.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: March 1, 2021 9:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] right clicking

 

Molly,

          You are the first person I know of who's attempting to do something I've taught my private students in the past.  And you don't use a "prepared mouse" to do that.

           It can be really handy to use the mouse to get a "quick and dirty" overview of a page, sometimes far more rapidly than you can sticking strictly with screen reader commands.

           After having done a "push it to the far left, and then up" to force the mouse to the top left of the screen, then doing a slow (not glacially slow) left to right, top to bottom "waving" of the mouse over the page can get you a lot of information very quickly.  There's a trick to it, but practice makes perfect.  And when you don't want to be actually using the mouse pointer, it's simple to cover that laser port with a piece of tape so you still have your real left and right click buttons available.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 

 


Re: right clicking

 

Molly,

          You are the first person I know of who's attempting to do something I've taught my private students in the past.  And you don't use a "prepared mouse" to do that.

           It can be really handy to use the mouse to get a "quick and dirty" overview of a page, sometimes far more rapidly than you can sticking strictly with screen reader commands.

           After having done a "push it to the far left, and then up" to force the mouse to the top left of the screen, then doing a slow (not glacially slow) left to right, top to bottom "waving" of the mouse over the page can get you a lot of information very quickly.  There's a trick to it, but practice makes perfect.  And when you don't want to be actually using the mouse pointer, it's simple to cover that laser port with a piece of tape so you still have your real left and right click buttons available.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Re: learning python

 

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 11:46 AM, Devin Prater wrote:
The only thing I could see needing some tutoring is the code editor, VS Code or Notepad Plus plus, and using a keyboard only approach to using the editor, and using less-than and greater-than instead of left angle bracket and right angle bracket.
-
Agreed.  But that has nothing to do, really, with learning Python.

And needing to learn the keyboard commands for any new piece of software you might be using is just a standard part of the procedure at all times, and has to do with that piece of software, not NVDA.

I'm not sure what you mean by the angle bracket part, as to me left angle bracket is synonymous with the less than sign and right angle bracket synonymous with greater than sign when it comes to a keyboard.  The terminology any given set of instructions might use for these will differ.  Of course, if you are initially unfamiliar with the interchangeability then you learn that very quickly.

But I've drifted way, way off of NVDA, and the entire topic was never really about NVDA.  I'd ask that this be taken to the NVDA Chat Subgroup or any of several other more appropriate venues that have already been mentioned.  The fact that NVDA is coded in Python doesn't make learning Python related to NVDA in the sense laid out in the group description or rules.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


aph eib 30

Richard Kuzma
 

Good afternoon,

I have two of these gadgets and the keyboard docking stations that they go inside.

Does anyone know what they are and are they still used or good for anything?

Thanks,

Rich

 


Re: right clicking

molly the blind tech lover
 

Hi.

I find this topic really interesting, as I am just starting to practice using a mouse in combination with NVDA.

I purchased a wireless mouse, as I needed one for my class.

With NVDA’s mouse tracking feature on, I am getting used to slowly moving the mouse to either right click or left click when I need to.

I am by no means good at using the mouse, but I like knowing it is possible to use the mouse.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, March 1, 2021 11:07 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] right clicking

 

And I will say, again, that while I understand entirely why a screen reader user does not want to use a mouse or mouse pad to move the mouse pointer, I fail to understand the resistance to using the actual left and right click buttons with a prepared mouse or a masked mousepad.

For a regular optical mouse, a piece of electrical tape placed over the laser output prevents it from ever moving the mouse pointer, giving you direct access to real left and right click buttons (and maybe a scroll wheel, depending on the mouse).  Using a small piece of thick-ish cardboard (like what's on the back of most writing pads, or a piece of a file folder) that's taped in place over the trackpad area of a laptop mousepad does exactly the same thing, still giving you access to the real left and right click buttons when you need them.

They're a lot more reliable than any screen reader's emulation of those buttons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Re: learning python

Devin Prater
 

The only thing I could see needing some tutoring is the code editor, VS Code or Notepad Plus plus, and using a keyboard only approach to using the editor, and using less-than and greater-than instead of left angle bracket and right angle bracket.

On 3/1/21 10:01 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 04:36 AM, Sascha Cowley wrote:
I fail to see why one would need the tutorial to be targeted specifically at blind people.
-
Amen to that, and not just in this context.   Very little about learning a programming language, or new program, or how Windows does something, is related to your visual status nor to your screen reader of preference.

And any screen reader user should know that "double click" means "select and activate" and "right click" means "select and bring up the context menu by the method of your choosing."

There's a lot more material out there that wasn't written with a screen reader user in mind that should be instantly understandable by anyone who does use one.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Re: right clicking

 

And I will say, again, that while I understand entirely why a screen reader user does not want to use a mouse or mouse pad to move the mouse pointer, I fail to understand the resistance to using the actual left and right click buttons with a prepared mouse or a masked mousepad.

For a regular optical mouse, a piece of electrical tape placed over the laser output prevents it from ever moving the mouse pointer, giving you direct access to real left and right click buttons (and maybe a scroll wheel, depending on the mouse).  Using a small piece of thick-ish cardboard (like what's on the back of most writing pads, or a piece of a file folder) that's taped in place over the trackpad area of a laptop mousepad does exactly the same thing, still giving you access to the real left and right click buttons when you need them.

They're a lot more reliable than any screen reader's emulation of those buttons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Re: learning python

 

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 04:36 AM, Sascha Cowley wrote:
I fail to see why one would need the tutorial to be targeted specifically at blind people.
-
Amen to that, and not just in this context.   Very little about learning a programming language, or new program, or how Windows does something, is related to your visual status nor to your screen reader of preference.

And any screen reader user should know that "double click" means "select and activate" and "right click" means "select and bring up the context menu by the method of your choosing."

There's a lot more material out there that wasn't written with a screen reader user in mind that should be instantly understandable by anyone who does use one.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Re: right clicking

Pettyjohn, Chris G. (FTC)
 

I know you found a solution.  But if you ever need to right click on anything else in the future you can do NVDA + numpad divide (/)  to move the mouse to the focused item and then NVDA + numpad multiply (*) to execute the right click.  


braille display model and info

Richard Kuzma
 

Hello everyone,

Was cleaning over the weekend and finally found the braille display I spoke of last week.

It is a power braille 40.

However, I know nothing about it.

I just have the unit and no cables.

I am not sure if it functions or not as it was given to me years ago.

If anyone is interested in it , just email me back.

rmkuzma@...

thanks,

rich

 


Re: learning python

Sascha Cowley
 

I fail to see why one would need the tutorial to be targeted specifically at blind people.
There is a good deal of first-party documentation available on the Python website. I first learnt Python with the book Python Crash Course by Eric Matthes (William Pollock, 978-1-59327-603-4).


Re: Most Responsive and Accessible Version of Microsoft Word

Bhavya shah
 

Dear David and Chris,

Interestingly, I use a mixture of ESpeak-NG and IBM Eloquence myself,
switching between the two from time to time. I think it is unlikely
that this issue has to do with the speech engine, because latency
therein would appear in more than just Word, unlike the Word-specific
lags I am encountering. In terms of specs, my laptop has 16 gb DDR4
RAM and an Intel I7 10th gen CPU. The lag I am talking about is,
approximately, of several hundred milliseconds, and occurs to varying
degrees during character, line as well as paragraph navigation
(non-exhaustive list). However, I ran the COM registration fixing tool
to no effect, but then restarted with add-ons disabled, and I think
there has been a noticeable change in performance. I would like to
measure this quantitatively so that I can detect changes with sureity
rather than by the sense I get; I understand information about time
after gesture for speech used to be recorded at one point in the Log
Viewer, though it does not seem to be anymore. This is a deviation
from my original question, but could someone please guide me as to how
to find out the exact time it takes for NVDA to speak after an input?

Thanks.

On 2/28/21, Chris Smart <ve3rwj@winsystem.org> wrote:
Strangely, I see even faster performance with a particular version of
IBM Eloquence than with eSpeak. Both are very snappy indeed though, and
we're talking only a few milliseconds difference here.







--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah
Stanford University | Class of 2024
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bhavyashah125/


Re: learning python

 

Hi Don

This youtube playlist offer tutorials on python programming with NVDA. I've just save it into my account, not listen yet. I think it would be useful for you: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCuspdftAujuMra_kKm1XkIpJaVg6y_Kr

Beside, consider joining python vis mailing list, the list where blind people discuss everything about python. Take a look at: https://www.freelists.org/list/pythonvis

Cuong

On 3/1/2021 5:45 AM, Don H wrote:
I have downloaded and installed python 3 on my system.  I downloaded some sample programs.  I can choose to edit one of the programs using Idle 3.9.  Doing this opens what I assume is Idle but NVDA will read nothing in this screen.  What am I missing.





Re: learning python

 

On Sun, Feb 28, 2021 at 05:46 PM, Don H wrote:
I can choose to edit one of the programs using Idle 3.9.
-
As an aside, you could use Notepad++ as your editor instead.  It does support Python language checking (among many others).
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Re: learning python

Ann Byrne
 

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