Date   

regular expressions for my keyboard only notations for math

Michael
 

Some regular expressions to go with my keyboard only notations for math         

The following material is likely more than anyone wants to read. Skip through it to material you do want to read. I have not updated NVDA to the current version. I may have said things about the speech dictionaries that aare no longer up-to-date.  Wherever  there are mistakes, forgive me.

 

Appendix 2 How To Modify The Speech Dictionary In NVDA

 

NVDA is a screen reading program produced by NV Access(R). It speaks the information about various parts of the active window in response to keystrokes pressed by the user. If the keystroke is not an NVDA command, NVDA merely echoes the keystroke. But, if it is an NVDA command keystroke such as NVDA-key + t, NVDA tells the user something about the active window. In the case of NVDA-Key + t, NVDA announces the title of the active window.  NVDA commands take the form of the NVDA-key followed by a letter. The INSERT key is by default the NVDA-key. However, NVDA allows the user to change the NVDA-key to the CapsLock key if desired.

The user can control how NVDA announces a string of characters.  If the user wants NVDA to speak a particular string of characters a certain way, he or she can make an entry in its speech dictionary for that particular string of characters. After this entry is saved into the speech dictionary, whenever that particular string of characters is encountered, NVDA speaks it according to the entry just made in the speech dictionary.

For example, NVDA ordinarily speaks the word tortilla with an “L” sound rather than a “y” sound.  To force NVDA to pronounce it with the “y” sound, there must be an entry in the speech dictionary to instruct NVDA to speak the string of characters “torteeya” as desired.

To make such an entry do the following.

STEP 1: Put focus on the main NVDA menu with the keystroke  NVDA-key + n. The user can arrow down through a list of submenus.  Or, press the letter “p” to go to the preferences menu. The first menu under “Preferences” is ‘General’. The user may arrow down the the Speech Dictionary or type ‘d” and NVDA will jump into the
default speech dictionary, There are three entries. They are respectively “Default”,
“voice”, and “temporary”.  I suggest putting my changes into the default dictionary.

But before entering the default dictionnary, a word about the other two choices is in order.

The user can arrow once to the voice dictionary which is  the dictionary belonging
to the synthesizer currently running. For instance, if the Microsoft Speech
Platform synthesizer is running, arrowing to the Voice Dictionary opens the dictionary whose entries govern the speech under that synthesizer. The entries in this
dictionary apply to the Microsoft Speech Platform session and not to any
other synthesizer that has been installed. Whatever synthesizer is running,
the entries in the default speech dictionary apply.
The tempory dictionary is like the voice dictionary, but it is erased when
you exit the NVDA session.

Entering the default dictionary. A list of entries will appear.  The user may add a new entry or arrow down to an entry he or she wishes to change. To add a new entry Tab once. To change an entry, arrow down the the entry in question and tab twice. Or to remove the entry in question, tab three times. But the object of this appendix is to add entries in support of the calculus book.

So, tab only once to add an entry. Focus will be on the “Add” button. Press the ENTER key to activate it. NVDA says “add a dictionary entry dialogue, pattern edit”. Focus is now in an edit box. The string of characters to be entered here is the string of characters as they appear in the text, that is, the actual character string encountered by the reading cursor.  As an example, type in the word tortilla. Press the TAB key ”.  again, and the focus will be in another edit box. NVDA will say “replacement pattern edit”. The replacement string to be typed will force NVDA to pronounce the word tortilla with a ‘y’ sound rather than an ‘l’ sound. That pattern is “tortee ya”.

Tab again to put focus in a comment edit box. Tabbing again puts focus on a check box called “Case sensitive”. Its default value is “not checked”. To make the replacement happen only when tortilla is upper case (either its first letter or all of them), press the space bar to check it.

Tabbing again puts focus on a combo box whose entries are respectively “anywhere, “forward”, and “regular expression”.   The “anywhere” choice means that the pattern being replaced may appear either by itself or anywhere in a longer string of
non-blank characters. The “forward” choice means that the pattern being replaced must appear at the very front of a longer string of characters. Of course, it may appear by itself and not part of a longer string of characters.  If the “forward” choice is picked, and the pattern being replaced appears following  one or more non-blank characters, NVDA will not speak using the replacement pattern.

 

Regular expressions are required to address certain situations where more
flexibility is needed,  and they will be discussed later. For now, suffice it
to say, that in the case of a regular expression, the pattern to be replaced
and the replacement pattern will contain special characters that will   
cause a more suffisticated replacement to take place.

Now, the user is ready to implement the  changes specified below.

However, since NVDA supports regular expressions, some of them will not be
entered into the NVDA speech dictionary.
The speech dictionary dialog may ask you if the Actual Pattern  should be case
sensitive.  If you check “no”, then any characters in the Actual Pattern string
may be either upper or lower case. If however, you check “yes”, then the
characters in the Actual Pattern string must exactly match the case of the
characters encountered in the text before the Replacement Pattern will be
triggorred.

The changes listed below do not need case sensitivity unless otherwise
stated.


SECTION0.1 Modifications For Chapter 1 Number Systems

 

Chapter 1 discusses number systems which uses * for multiplication, / for
division, + for addition, and – for subtraction.

One change for chapter 1 is that for section headings, “SECTION”.

Actual Pattern=”SECTION”, Replacement Pattern=”section”

The other change is that Subscripts in this book are indicated by the
suffix underscore plus an integer. An example is x_0 for x sub zero.

Actual Pattern=_”, Replacement Pattern=”sub”

Some readers may wish to hear x^2 read as x squared rather than x raised to
exponent 2 and also x^3 read as x cubed. .  If the reader is willing to
treat these two cases as special cases, the preferred reading can be
supported as follows. Use two carot symbols instead of one, and preceed the
carots with a space. Without that space, the variable name may not be spoken clearly. For example, write x cubed as x ^^3.

This will require the user to make the following changes to the speech
dictionary.

Add the following entry.

Actual Pattern ^^2 and Replacement Pattern squared.

The change for x cubed is similar.

SECTION0.2 Modifications for Chapter 2 Functions
Chapter 2 discusses functions of one and of two variables. I introduce
notation for exponents, denominators, and absolute value.

Below is a list of changes I propose to make to the speech dictionary for
chapter 2.

It would be nice if the characters “f(x)” is spoken as
“f of x”. But, we also want “g(t)” to be read as “g of t”.

IN other words, we want the function name to be any character upper or lower
case and to have a subscript.  We also want flexibility in the number of
independent variables and also flexibility of  variable names.

Three regular expressions  working together accomplish this goal.

 

Regular expression recognizing the function name and opening parenthesis.:

Actual Pattern:

“([a-zA-Z])\(“

Replacement Pattern:

“\1           of    open parenthesis                “

 

Regular expression recognizing all arguments which are followed by a comma:

Actual Pattern:
“*([a-zA-Z]?)(\_?\d*)([/\.]?\d*) *([-]|[+]?) *([a-zA-Z]?)(\_?\d*)([/\.]?\d*) *[\,]{1}”

Replacement Pattern:

“\1 \2 \3 \4 \5 \6 \7    , “

 

Regular expression recognizing an argument not followed by a comma:

Actual Pattern:

“*([a-zA-Z]*)(\_?\d*)([/\.]?\d*) *([-]|[+]?) *([a-zA-Z]?)(\_?\d*)([/\.]?\d*) *\)”

Replacement Pattern:

“\1 \2 \3 \4 \5\6 \7     close parenthesis     “

 

 

H(x0)  will be read as “h of x”. The function name (f, g, h, or any other letter)
does not matter.

The following changes do not involve regular expressions.

 


actualPattern=:R->R, Replacement Pattern= maps R into R

 

Actual Pattern=”+/-“, Replacement Pattern=”plus or minus”

Actual Pattern=”<=”, Replacement Pattern=”less than or equal to”

Actual Pattern=”>=”, Replacement Pattern=”greater than or equal to”

ActualPattern=!, Replacement Pattern=factorial
ActualPattern=_, Replacement Pattern=sub

 

Actual Pattern=”(/”, Replacement Pattern=”open parenthesis begin denominator”

Actual Pattern=”/)”, Replacement Pattern=”end of denominator close parenthesis”

Actual Pattern=”(^”, Replacement Pattern=”open parenthesis begin exponent”

Actual Pattern=”^)”, Replacement Pattern=”end of exponent close parenthesis”

Actual Pattern=”(|”, Replacement Pattern=”open parenthesis begin absolute value”

Actual Pattern=”|)”, Replacement Pattern=”end of absolute value close parenthesis”

Actual Pattern=”}/”, Replacement Pattern=”open brace begin denominator”

Actual Pattern=”/}”, Replacement Pattern=”end of denominator close brace”

Actual Pattern=”{^”, Replacement Pattern=”open brace begin exponent”

Actual Pattern=”^}”, Replacement Pattern=”end of exponent close brace”

Actual Pattern=”{|”, Replacement Pattern=”open brace begin absolute value”

Actual Pattern=”|}”, Replacement Pattern=”end of absolute value close brace”

Actual Pattern=”[/”, Replacement Pattern=”open bracket begin denominator”

Actual Pattern=”/]”, Replacement Pattern=”end of denominator close bracket”

Actual Pattern=”[^”, Replacement Pattern=”open bracket begin exponent”

Actual Pattern=”^]”, Replacement Pattern=”end of exponent close bracket”

Actual Pattern=”[|”, Replacement Pattern=”open bracket begin absolute value”

Actual Pattern=”|]”, Replacement Pattern=”end of absolute value close bracket”

 

NOTE: In the text, I only use parentheses to specify begin and end of
exponents, denominators, and absolute value. It is up to you whether to use
braces and brackets as well. But, if you do decide to use braces and brackets
n addition to parentheses, I strongly suggest 
that  the Replacement Pattern mentions the brace or bracket   . unless you do,
the speech will not help you keep track of opening and closing braces and
brackets. If documents you send to your professor do not have an equal number
of opening and closing braces/brackets/parentheses, he  or she will think
you are confused and maybe lower your grade.

 

SECTION0.3Modifications For Chapters 3, 4, and 5

The chapter on limits only needs two changes to the speech dictionary. No
changes are needed for chapters 4 and 5.

 

Actual Pattern=”lim:”, Replacement Pattern=”limit as”

Actual Pattern=”->”, Replacement Pattern=”approaches”

 

SECTION0.4Modifications For Chapters 6, 7, and 8

 

Regular expression for what variable a derivative is taken with respect to:

Actual Pattern:

“(\/)d([a-zA-Z])(\))”

Replacement Pattern:

“with respect to           \2”

 

Actual Pattern= (d0

Replacement Pattern=”Open parenthesis  ze rowth derivative”

 

Actual Pattern=”(d1”

Replacement Pattern=”Open parenthesis first derivative”

 

Actual Pattern= “(d2”

Replacement Pattern=” Open parenthesis second derivative”

 

Actual Pattern= “(d3”

Replacement Pattern=”Open parenthesis third derivative”

Ordinary derivative whose differentiation level is specified by an integer:

Fourth derivative:

Actual Pattern:

“(d4”

Replacement Pattern:

“open parenthesis fourth derivative”

 

Eighth derivative:

Actual Pattern:

“(d8”

Replacement Pattern:

“Open parenthesis eighthth derivative “

 

The first, second, third, fourth, and eighth derivatives are entries that are
not regular expressions. They are more understandable when not handled by a
regular expression.

However, the fifth, sixth, seventh, and ninth derivatives are all handled by a
regular expression. Their replacement patterns are very understandable.

Regular expression recognizing fifth, sixth, seventh, and ninth derivatives:

Actual Pattern:

“(\()d([5679])”

Replacement Pattern:

“open parenthesis               \2   th    derivative”

 

Ordinary derivatives whose  differentiation level is specified by an index variable:

This regular expression comes into play in a future chapter, but it fits here.

Actual Pattern:

“(\()d([a-zA-Z])([-]|[+]?)([1-9]?)”

Replacement Pattern:

“open parenthesis       \2      th        \3    \4          derivative”

 

 

SECTION0.5 Modifications For Chapter 9, Rieman Integration

This chapter introduces notations for summation and for integrals.

I leave it to the reader whether or not to make this group case sensitive. I mean demanding that the characters “int” should be upper case to prevent collisions in the text.

 

 

Actual Pattern=”/INT”, Replacement Pattern=”integral”

Actual Pattern=”/INT{“, Replacement Pattern=”integral lower bound”

Actual Pattern=”{/u“, Replacement Pattern=”begin upper bound”
Actual Pattern=”/u}“, Replacement Pattern=”end of upper bound, and the integrand is ”

 

Actual Pattern=”/INT{}”, Replacement Pattern=”indefinite integral”

Actual Pattern=”/INT{}:”, Replacement Pattern=”indefinite integral of the integrand”

Actual Pattern=”/INT{}”, Replacement Pattern=”integral”


I found myself entering the above integral notations using brackets instead
of braces, so I recommend including the following just to make the entering
text more forgiving.

Actual pattern=”[/l“, replacement pattern=”begin lower bound”
Actual pattern=”/l]“, replacement pattern=”end of lower bound”

 

Actual Pattern=”]/u“, Replacement Pattern=”begin upper bound”

 

actual pattern =”/u[“, replacement pattern =”end of upper bound, and the integrand is,”
actual pattern =”/INT[]”, replacement pattern =”indefinite integral”
actual pattern =”/INT[]:”, replacement pattern =”indefinite integral of the integrand”

Your professor might prefer the representation of an upper bound used in
latex which is “\to”.
Actual Pattern=”\to”, Replacement Pattern=”and upper bound”

 

Actual Pattern=”/INTI”, Replacement Pattern=”inner integral”

Actual Pattern=”/INTM”, Replacement Pattern=”middle integral”

Actual Pattern=”/INTO”, Replacement Pattern=”outer integral”

SECTION0.6 Modifications for Chapter 12 Vectors

actual pattern={||x+y||},
Replacement Pattern=open brace begin norm x+y end norm close brace

 

Actual pattern=DET2, Replacement Pattern=second order determinant

Actual pattern=DET3, Replacement Pattern=third order determinant

Actual pattern=(.), Replacement Pattern=dot product

Actual pattern=(*), Replacement Pattern=cross product


 SECTION0.7 Modifications For Chapter 13

 

Partial derivative whose differentiation level is specified by an integer:

Fourth partial derivative:

Actual Pattern:

“(pd4”

Replacement Pattern:

“open parenthesis fourth partial derivative”

 

Eighth partial derivative:

Actual Pattern:

“(pd8”

Replacement Pattern:

“open parenthesis eighth partial derivative”

 

Regular expression recognizing fifth, sixth, seventh, and ninth partial derivatives:

Actual Pattern:

“(\()pd([5679]  )”

Replacement Pattern:

“open parenthesis       \2     th partial derivative

 

Partial derivative whose differentation level is specified by an index variable:

Actual Pattern:

“(\()pd([a-zA-Z])([-]|[+]?)([1-9]?)”

Replacement Pattern:

open parenthesis       \2      th        \3    \4          partial derivative

 

 

SECTION0.8 Modifications For Chapters 14, 15, 16, and 17


actualWord=:R->Rn Replacement Pattern=maps R into R n

 

actualWord=:R2->R2 Replacement Pattern=maps R2 into R2

 

actualWord=:R3->R3 Replacement Pattern=maps R3 into R3

 

actualWord=:Rn->Rn Replacement Pattern=maps R n into R n

 

actualWord=:R2->R Replacement Pattern=maps R2 into R

 

actualWord=:R3->R Replacement Pattern=maps R3 into R

actualWord=:RN->R Replacement Pattern=maps RN into R

 

This group is case sensitive.

 

Actual Pattern=”/DINT:”, Replacement Pattern=”double integral”

Actual Pattern=”/LINT:”, Replacement Pattern=”line integral over curve”

Actual Pattern=”/SINT:”, Replacement Pattern=”surface integral”

Actual Pattern=”/TINT:”, Replacement Pattern=”triple integral”

There is a set of notations for derivatives for which I made no entries into the speech dictionary. It is not uncommon to represent a derivative by following the function name with an apostrophe. For example, f’(x) represents the first  derivative of f(x). Likewise, f’’(x) is the second derivative of f(x). You may occasionally encounter three apostrophes for third derivative such as for example f’’’(x). However, it is unlikely that the student will ever see more than three apostrophes for differentiation. In fact, the use of apostrophe for differentiation is more prevalent in differential equations books than in a calculus text.

So, if the student hears ’ or y’’, he or she should understand that differentiation is being represented. Just get used to it.

Testing regular expressions involving carrot and parenthesis exposed a problem in two of the seven synthesizers I exercised. Those two are Microsoft Speech Platform and Microsoft SAPI5. The other five synthesizers passed the test.

I tested regular expressions for beginning and ending exponential expressions.

My syntax for these exponential expressions is that  the expressions are bracketed between (^ and ^).

 

Regular expression to recognize beginning of exponential expression:

Actual Pattern:

[\(][\^]

Replacement Pattern:

Begin exponent

 

 

Regular expression to recognize end  of exponential expression:

Actual Pattern:

[\^][\)]

Replacement Pattern:

end of exponent

 

The regular expression for the end of an exponential expression fails to recognize the end.

The regular expression for the beginning exponential expression works as expected.

The two regular expressions are very similar. Why does one work and not the other?

Here are some test cases:

  (^ ^)

(^w+3^)

I then wrote a regular expression to recognize the pair “()”, and NVDA sees the closing parenthesis but not the opening one. Puzzling!

 

The following synthesizers execute these regular expressions correctly.

Eloquence,

ESpeak NG,

Soft Voice,

Speech Player ESpeak,

SVox Pico Synthesizer,

The following synthesizers did not execute these regular expressions correctly.

Microsoft Speech API Version 5,

Microsoft Speech Platform

For these last two synthesizers, I input the regular expressions into their Voice Dictionaries.

 

(^ w + 3^)

Begin exponent is recognized but not the end of exponent.

 

This is not a fix but what I did to expose the problem.

NOTE: The number of spaces specified in the replacement patterns for regular expressions should not be ignored. Some parts of the replacement string may be spoken so quickly, that you, the listener, may hear them as a nonintelligible blip.

© Michael R. Cross

 

 


a keyboard approach only to read and write math equations

Michael
 

Examples of equations using the keyboard only:

Agree with those you will communicate with how you want to express mathematical notation. There is no one right way to do fthis as long as you are all consistent.  The carrot symbol usually precedes an exponent. x^3 is x cubed.

 

y = LIM: x->5: f(x) means y = the limit as x approaches 5 of the funtction F(x).

 

y = (d2/dx) f(x) means y = the second derivative with respect to x of the  function f(x).

 

y = (d3/dx) f(x) means y = the third derivative with respect to x of the function f(x).

 

y = INT:{L5}:{U7}: f(x) dx

means y = the integral from lower bound 5 to  upper bound 7 of the function f(x) with respect to x.

In print books the lower bound is expressed as a subscript. The upper bound is expressed as a superscript. You may choose to do it this way.

y = INT: subscript 5 superscript 7 f(x) dx.

 

Exponents are also usually expressed as a supersscript.

Assume that you are sending what you write to a person capable of forgiving minor syntax errors rather than to a piece of software  which will not forgive minor errors.

A professor with several degrees in mathematics will understand immediately what you mean, and will probably suggest  improvements.

This is only a start. Don't ask your professor to learn Braille.  I recommend that you not put a piece of software between you and the person you are trying to communicate with. Such a piece of software will act  like a precompiler that your input has to satisfy before your message reaches your audience. Just a suggestion. Do what you want.

Once everybody has agreed to thses notations, you can write regular expressions to have what you write read as it would be spoken in a math class.

Good luck.

 

 

 

 


Re: NVDA User Guide doesn't open in default browser

Louise Pfau
 

I tested several web-based manuals.  Most opened in Edge, but a few opened in another browser for some reason.  I used the shortcuts linked to the manuals in the program menus.  When I installed the beta of NVDA 2020.4 however, the NVDA user guide opened in Edge.  I think I might have mentioned that the issue was resolved in another post in this thread.
 
Thanks,
 
Louise


Re: Strange behaviour of Google Chrome

Gene
 

Cookies take up space on the hard drive but its minimal. They are tiny text files and you could have thousands of cookies and take very little room. At times, a cookie may cause a problem and need to be deleted. That may have been the case in this instance. I suspect in such cases, the cookie has somehow been corrupted, thus my discussion of backing up cookies so you can restore cookies and perhaps replace the corrupted one with one that isn't.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Louise Pfau
Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2021 1:08 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Strange behaviour of Google Chrome

When I looked through the options of what to delete, it said that the
cookies were taking up space on the hard drive. The reason I deleted the
browsing data in the first place was because NVDA wasn't navigating the
banking page correctly.

Louise


Re: Strange behaviour of Google Chrome

Louise Pfau
 

When I looked through the options of what to delete, it said that the cookies were taking up space on the hard drive. The reason I deleted the browsing data in the first place was because NVDA wasn't navigating the banking page correctly.

Louise


Re: What are the accessible mathematics read and write solutions?

Bruno Aníbal Prieto González
 

I recommend using Pandoc to convert between different formats. If you
have a file, in Word or LaTeX format, you can convert it to html and
read it with the NVDA Access8Math add-on. If you want to produce math,
you can use Markdown, and formulas are entered between $here goes the
formula$, inside those dollar signs you must enter the formula in
LaTeX format. You can convert that to PDF, Word, HTML, etc.

2021-04-06 5:03 GMT-04:00, Sascha Cowley via groups.io
<sascha.camille=yahoo.com@groups.io>:

There is MathPlayer ( https://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathplayer/ ) ,
which works with NVDA and Firefox to make some maths content accessible. It
also supposedly works with Microsoft Word, though I have personally never
managed to get this working.
With experimental UIA support enabled for Word, native equations in Word are
fairly accessible, or were when I tried it some months ago. I've also had a
little success using equations in Google Docs, though I had trouble
inputting them. I have not worked with the Docs equation editor very much at
all, though, so I may have just been missing something.
Using LaTeX, or a similar (even ad hoc) plane text notation is often
successful. The advantage with LaTeX is that it produces nicely typeset
output. Unfortunately, it is extremely picky, and debugging output is often
not very helpful. Plus it's just a lot to learn.






Re: Pausing nvda...

Gene
 

I don't know if an add-on allows such things to be blocked. I just turn off speech, as has already been discussed. The shift command only pauses speech during read all or read to end or whatever its called. Control only stops current speech and won't affect announcements such as we are discussing.

However, at times, it may be useful to hear an announcement. Perhaps you might want to lower NVDA volume so you hear announcements but much more softly.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Mullins
Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2021 4:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Pausing nvda...



Hi

You can use the shift key to pause /resume speech when a “say all” command has been issued but I don’t think it will work to block message announcements during a Skype call.



Cheers

Chris



Sent from Mail for Windows 10





From: Monte Single
Sent: 06 April 2021 01:33
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Pausing nvda...





Hi List,



Maybe I've missed some posts on thisthread.

The simplest way to pause and resume nvda reading is to press the shift key,

like a toggle, off and on.

It works.



Cheers,



Monte



-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Luke Davis

Sent: April 5, 2021 6:03 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Pausing nvda...



On Mon, 5 Apr 2021, Brian Vogel wrote:



Is there another command that allows for NVDA output to be suspended,
entirely, while not requiring that one exit it? I could have sworn there

was, but perhaps not.



Another? As in: other than speech mode off, which does exactly that?



Or, do you mean a command that will do what speech mode off does, but also

globally disable keyboard intercept as sleep mode does for an application?

If you want that, I don't know of anything, but then I can't imagine why

having that would be easier than unloading NVDA.



Setting your speech synth to "No speech" will do something similar to speech

mode off, and I suppose you can do that with a profile, which you can't do

with sleep mode.



Luke


Re: Pausing nvda...

Carlos Esteban Martínez Macías
 

Hi all.
Is possible that some installers have a message wile the process is runing, that says, for example, coping files to c:\program files\example or similar. So, is the installer have this mesages but a progress bar not is here, the speech mode on beep can make a sound that stop when the process is finished.
Regards.

Músico (pianista) y ayuda a usuarios ciegos y con discapacidad visual en el uso de lectores de pantalla y tecnología. Experto certificado en el lector de pantalla NVDA.

Musician (pianist) and help to the blind people and with visual disability in use of screen readers and technology. Certified expert in the screen reader NVDA.


Re: Are there any extensions for LibreOffice?

Rui Fontes
 

Try contacting with:

Quentin Christensen <quentin@...>


Rui Fontes


Às 14:56 de 06/04/2021, Richard B. McDonald escreveu:

Hi Gigi!

 

Yes indeed, everything you say is correct.  No doubt, some collaboration between NVDA and LibreOffice (LO) seems necessary. 

 

In fact, I am presently connected with a person in Germany who is involved with LO development and who has a keen interest in improving LO’s accessibility.  He has likewise noted that some sort of collaboration is needed.  My problem is that I do not have any contacts within NVDA to try to connect them with LO.  I have said to my LO contact that I am willing to volunteer to improve accessibility.  I just do not know how to go about it. 

 

Do you know what I can do to foster this?

 

Thanks,

Richard

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gianluigi Coppelletti
Sent: Monday, April 05, 2021 7:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Are there any extensions for LibreOffice?

 

Hi,

I'm afraid that there aren't any, but I really hope that the accessibility of LibreOffice with NVDA will be improved in the future, because more and more blind users are choosing this suite as this is a very good free alternative to MS-Office. Unfortunately this doesn't depend on the NVDA's developpers only.

Ciao.

Gigi

Il 01/04/2021 23.07, Richard B. McDonald ha scritto:

Hi!

 

I am using Windows 10, NVDA 2020.4 and LibreOffice 7.2.  Are there any extensions for NVDA that improve its accessibility with LibreOffice?  In particular, LibreOffice has a spreadsheet application, Calc, that has some material accessibility issues.

 

Thanks,

Richard


Re: Are there any extensions for LibreOffice?

Richard B. McDonald
 

Hi Gigi!

 

Yes indeed, everything you say is correct.  No doubt, some collaboration between NVDA and LibreOffice (LO) seems necessary. 

 

In fact, I am presently connected with a person in Germany who is involved with LO development and who has a keen interest in improving LO’s accessibility.  He has likewise noted that some sort of collaboration is needed.  My problem is that I do not have any contacts within NVDA to try to connect them with LO.  I have said to my LO contact that I am willing to volunteer to improve accessibility.  I just do not know how to go about it. 

 

Do you know what I can do to foster this?

 

Thanks,

Richard

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gianluigi Coppelletti
Sent: Monday, April 05, 2021 7:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Are there any extensions for LibreOffice?

 

Hi,

I'm afraid that there aren't any, but I really hope that the accessibility of LibreOffice with NVDA will be improved in the future, because more and more blind users are choosing this suite as this is a very good free alternative to MS-Office. Unfortunately this doesn't depend on the NVDA's developpers only.

Ciao.

Gigi

Il 01/04/2021 23.07, Richard B. McDonald ha scritto:

Hi!

 

I am using Windows 10, NVDA 2020.4 and LibreOffice 7.2.  Are there any extensions for NVDA that improve its accessibility with LibreOffice?  In particular, LibreOffice has a spreadsheet application, Calc, that has some material accessibility issues.

 

Thanks,

Richard


Re: edit user guide

 

Microsoft documents, and well, each and every keyboard shortcut for virtually every product they make, and definitely for the Office suite programs.

These keyboard shortcuts, and all program-specific keyboard shortcuts, are not NVDA shortcuts and would have no place in the NVDA user guide, as they have nothing whatsoever to do with NVDA (or any screen reader, for that matter).
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Re: Working with MS-Excel

falkogiepmans@...
 

There is a nice video series on youtube by Teacher Ryan O. Unfortunately this is hearing based so I'm not sure if this is helpfull for you.
 
 


Re: NVDA User Guide doesn't open in default browser

falkogiepmans@...
 

Did you test it another web-based manual with the same extension? If it is a different kind of file the default program can be different as well.
 
 


edit user guide

falkogiepmans@...
 

Hi All,

I would like to include some windows key shortcuts for Excel in the user guide (like control+arrows to find data in a sheet). It occurred to me that a lot of people are not aware of this and look in the NVDA user guide thinking that is all. 
How can I efficiently contribute to this? Should I make a pull-request on the github of NVDA?

Thanks in advance,
Falko
 
 


Re: Pausing nvda...

Jarek.Krcmar
 

Nvda+S.If you press at first this hotkey, you stop the talking, if you press twice, Nvda will beef, if you press three, Nvda will talk.

Jarek


Dne 05.04.2021 v 14:20 Arun napsal(a):


What is the best way to pause nvda while I am on a skype call…

Arun



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Verze detekcniho jadra: 23081 (20210405)

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Re: Pausing nvda...

Chris Mullins
 

Hi

You can use the shift key to pause /resume speech when a “say all” command has been issued but I don’t think it will work to block message announcements during a Skype call.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Monte Single
Sent: 06 April 2021 01:33
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Pausing nvda...

 

Hi List,

 

Maybe I've missed some posts on thisthread.

The simplest way to pause and resume nvda reading is to press the shift key,

like a toggle,  off and on.

It works.

 

Cheers,

 

Monte

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Luke Davis

Sent: April 5, 2021 6:03 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Pausing nvda...

 

On Mon, 5 Apr 2021, Brian Vogel wrote:

 

> Is there another command that allows for NVDA output to be suspended,

entirely, while not requiring that one exit it?  I could have sworn there

was, but perhaps not.

 

Another? As in: other than speech mode off, which does exactly that?

 

Or, do you mean a command that will do what speech mode off does, but also

globally disable keyboard intercept as sleep mode does for an application?

If you want that, I don't know of anything, but then I can't imagine why

having that would be easier than unloading NVDA.

 

Setting your speech synth to "No speech" will do something similar to speech

mode off, and I suppose you can do that with a profile, which you can't do

with sleep mode.

 

Luke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: What are the accessible mathematics read and write solutions?

Sascha Cowley
 

There is MathPlayer, which works with NVDA and Firefox to make some maths content accessible. It also supposedly works with Microsoft Word, though I have personally never managed to get this working.
With experimental UIA support enabled for Word, native equations in Word are fairly accessible, or were when I tried it some months ago. I've also had a little success using equations in Google Docs, though I had trouble inputting them. I have not worked with the Docs equation editor very much at all, though, so I may have just been missing something.
Using LaTeX, or a similar (even ad hoc) plane text notation is often successful. The advantage with LaTeX is that it produces nicely typeset output. Unfortunately, it is extremely picky, and debugging output is often not very helpful. Plus it's just a lot to learn.


What are the accessible mathematics read and write solutions?

=?ISO-2022-JP?Q?=1B$B9b=4082=22=1B=28J?=
 

Hi,

How do you write math equations to the sighted person with nvda?
Are there accessible methods for reading and writting mathematical meterials?


Re: NVDA21 incompatible with Code Factory’s Eloquence&Vocalizer voices?

zvonimir stanečić, 9a5dsz
 

Hi,

I wrote e-mail to the codefactory devs.

They will make appropriate changes as needed.

Best,

Zvonimir

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nimer Jaber
Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA21 incompatible with Code Factory’s Eloquence&Vocalizer voices?

 

Hello,

 

2021.1 is an add-on-breaking release. It is hoped that add-on authors will update their add-ons, but any information regarding specific add-ons will come from the authors of that add-on. I would suggest possibly reaching out to them, or asking on the add-ons list, although I would hope that additional information will be provided to this group regarding popular add-ons in time as well.

 

Thanks.

 

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 11:37 AM Gerardo Corripio <gera1027@...> wrote:

What news do you guys have of NVDA2021’s incompatibility with version 1.9 of Code Factory’s Combo Eloquence&Vocalizer voices? I’ve a blind friend over at the Spanish NVDA group who is having this problem; he wants to try the Alfa versions of NVDA 2021.1 with the CF voices! the symth is recognized, but the voices don’t run. I wound’t want to run into unpleasant surprises upon updating! Thus if this it so, and because I know some of you guys here also have Code Factory’s Eloquence &Vocalizer combo, to be on the lookout for when the final NVDA version ie released. Any of you have have any ideas what’s going on?

Gera
Enviado desde mi iPhone SE (2nd Generation) de Telcel




 

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Re: Pausing nvda...

Monte Single
 

Hi List,

Maybe I've missed some posts on thisthread.
The simplest way to pause and resume nvda reading is to press the shift key,
like a toggle, off and on.
It works.

Cheers,

Monte

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Luke Davis
Sent: April 5, 2021 6:03 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Pausing nvda...

On Mon, 5 Apr 2021, Brian Vogel wrote:

Is there another command that allows for NVDA output to be suspended,
entirely, while not requiring that one exit it?  I could have sworn there
was, but perhaps not.

Another? As in: other than speech mode off, which does exactly that?

Or, do you mean a command that will do what speech mode off does, but also
globally disable keyboard intercept as sleep mode does for an application?
If you want that, I don't know of anything, but then I can't imagine why
having that would be easier than unloading NVDA.

Setting your speech synth to "No speech" will do something similar to speech
mode off, and I suppose you can do that with a profile, which you can't do
with sleep mode.

Luke

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