Date   

Re: deleting something from my music drive

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Yes since last weeks windows updates old version of goldwave keeps deciding bits I've hidden will show and this stops the add on form working. Still working on this.

Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 3:22 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] deleting something from my music drive


To be honest lately I can go to say a blank folder or say open say word 2013 or 2016 and nvda will not anounce something till I tab round or alt tab out and in then it shows.
I am on a few units with issues its not done that as such on mine but one of the systems is my latest win10 workstation which does work and a 7 one which doesn't work that well.
Whenever I enter a folder it does not speak unless there is something its even doing that on my workstation so yeah I don't know why that does that.



On 20/09/2016 7:30 a.m., Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, everyone,


I tried to delete something from my external hard drive which has my
music on it but when I hit the delete key, all I got was "progress". I
used to hear "are you sure you want to send this file to the recycle
bin" but now I don't hear it anymore. How do I get that message back?


Thanks for your help in advance.


Rosemarie





.


Re: Spotify

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

I've noticed a certain reluctance on many sites for flash to actually be used, so I suspect this may be an ongoing problem generally, not with nvda though.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "kelby carlson" <kelbycarlson@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 3:21 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Spotify


I use Firefox. When I re-opened the player it seemed to work, but
clicking on most things just brought me back to the top of the page.
Same thing with Internet Explorer. So far the application works
better, though still has some issues.

On 9/19/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
You may be using a script blocker that is keeping flash from being seen and
running on the site. What browser or browsers are you using? I'm not sure
what accounts for the problem but to discuss it further, we need such
information. Do you use more than one browser and if so, which ones?

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: kelby carlson
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 8:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Spotify


The web player isn't working; it tells me I need to install flash even
though I have the latest update.

On 9/19/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
I don't know, these days, if, or to what extent spotify is accessible
using
the computer application you install. It is reasonably accessible using
the
web site. If you are logged in and play something using a browser, that
is
reasonably accessible.

You may not get as good sound that way, but the sound will be reasonably
good.

Gene


From: kelby carlson
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 6:36 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Spotify


Is Spotify accessible with NVDA? Do you need an adon to use it?




Re: Mystery surrounding computer

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Its not a new idea, way back in the days of 8 bit home computers, many of the settings could be changed in exactly this way, also saving a back up copy of the original settings if you screwed it all up.
It always seemed to me that pcs were well behind on this aspect but as has been said I suppose security hacking could be a problem.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Mullins" <cjmullins29@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:55 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Mystery surrounding computer


That sounds like a sensible idea. On the computer, have an app to maintain
something like a Bios.Ini file which refreshes the bios when you restart the
machine. No doubt there are many security implications but it could
possibly use existing screen reader technology to make it accessible.

Cheers
Chris
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rui
Fontes
Sent: 20 September 2016 00:27
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Mystery surrounding computer

The new Toshiba laptops have a more or less accessible program to set some
BIOS settings...
You must restart the laptop to changes take effect.

Rui



-----Mensagem Original-----
De: Chris Mullins
Data: 19 de setembro de 2016 21:26
Para: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Assunto: Re: [nvda] Mystery surrounding computer



I've had a quick look on the net and there are a couple of ways described
for getting into the bios on the UEFI machine but the principle of reverting

to a standard keyboard function then using the fn key to invoke smart mode
remains the same. I too know of no screen reader that can operate at the
bios level and I think it unlikely there could be, so sighted assistance
would be required to make the changes.



Cheers

Chris



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian
Vogel
Sent: 19 September 2016 17:14
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Mystery surrounding computer





Chris,

That's a great set of instructions, but it predates UEFI. For
those who have a machine with UEFI there will be a couple of steps to get to

the BIOS function under UEFI.

I still don't know of any screen reader that operates this early
in the boot sequence, no matter if we're talking a native BIOS machine or a
newer one with UEFI. My HP laptop had the keys set for multimedia mode, but

the machine is UEFI based and that function is called SmartKeys on this
model. Now that I've turned off the SmartKeys (ActionKeys in your posted
example) I'm back to having to hit the Fn key plus the actual function key
to invoke the media function, which is just how I like it.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never
enough to keep up.



~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in
the Universe"



















Re: Spotify

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

A brain transplant would be handy though...
I've never mastered it I have to say.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "kelby carlson" <kelbycarlson@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:36 AM
Subject: [nvda] Spotify


Is Spotify accessible with NVDA? Do you need an adon to use it?


Re: Windows Explorer

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Create a new folder shift control n
However one can reset the menus to old style but you still find the shortcut faster nonetheless.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "kelby carlson" <kelbycarlson@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 10:40 PM
Subject: [nvda] Windows Explorer


In Windows 10, I'm having trouble doing a lot of things in Windows
explorer. Pressing the alt key doesn't bring up the ribbons to do
things like create a new folder. Is this an NVDA issue?


Re: Mystery surrounding computer

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Its a pity nobody makes bios update software that can do this via a dummy file on screen, then load in the changes at a restart. After all one can find bios updates for many computers and this seems to be how they all work.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Mullins" <cjmullins29@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 9:26 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Mystery surrounding computer


I’ve had a quick look on the net and there are a couple of ways described for getting into the bios on the UEFI machine but the principle of reverting to a standard keyboard function then using the fn key to invoke smart mode remains the same. I too know of no screen reader that can operate at the bios level and I think it unlikely there could be, so sighted assistance would be required to make the changes.



Cheers

Chris

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 19 September 2016 17:14
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Mystery surrounding computer



Chris,

That's a great set of instructions, but it predates UEFI. For those who have a machine with UEFI there will be a couple of steps to get to the BIOS function under UEFI.

I still don't know of any screen reader that operates this early in the boot sequence, no matter if we're talking a native BIOS machine or a newer one with UEFI. My HP laptop had the keys set for multimedia mode, but the machine is UEFI based and that function is called SmartKeys on this model. Now that I've turned off the SmartKeys (ActionKeys in your posted example) I'm back to having to hit the Fn key plus the actual function key to invoke the media function, which is just how I like it.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"


Re: Antivirus

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi,


I tried AVG years ago and didn't like it because it interfered with speech. I use windows defender.


Rosemarie

On 9/20/2016 4:53 AM, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io wrote:
Hi,


It seems to me that the antivirus developers are the less accessible-minded people in the software industry.

Until now I have not found an antivirus that can be used with NVDA. From totally inaccessible right from the installation to barely usable, none of the most famous free antivirus can be used without problems.

I am using AVG because at least it can be automatically installed with Ninite, but NVDA cannot read the messages dialog, I cannot configure the antivirus and every time I install NVDA I need help from someone cause AVG "don't like" something and NVDA stops responding.

What are your experiences in this matter?




Re: deleting something from my music drive

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Which version of windows is this? I have come across a hidden window, at least its hidden form nvda till you find it which suggests you cannot do this do you want to do it with raised priveldges. The strange thing is that alt tab does not seem to show this alert until you try to close a window down. This is on Windows 10 and does not always seem to happen either.

I also sometimes find a windo that says something like, there are x suspendied tasks, do you want to, blabla.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Rosemarie Chavarria" <knitqueen2007@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 8:30 PM
Subject: [nvda] deleting something from my music drive


Hi, everyone,


I tried to delete something from my external hard drive which has my music on it but when I hit the delete key, all I got was "progress". I used to hear "are you sure you want to send this file to the recycle bin" but now I don't hear it anymore. How do I get that message back?


Thanks for your help in advance.


Rosemarie





Re: Antivirus

 

On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 09:08 am, Gene wrote:
But I don't consider that to be license to not look for good programs.

And I consider both Microsoft Security Essentials and Windows Defender to be good programs.   The old saying, "The perfect is the enemy of the good," applies here.

To each his or her own.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

    



Re: Mystery surrounding computer

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

One would have thought they might have put this on a key combination somewhere as we cannot be the only ones who require normal operation. what about other software that uses control keys employing alt?
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 5:13 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Mystery surrounding computer


Chris,

That's a great set of instructions, but it predates UEFI. For those who have a machine with UEFI there will be a couple of steps to get to the BIOS function under UEFI.

I still don't know of any screen reader that operates this early in the boot sequence, no matter if we're talking a native BIOS machine or a newer one with UEFI. My HP laptop had the keys set for multimedia mode, but the machine is UEFI based and that function is called SmartKeys on this model. Now that I've turned off the SmartKeys (ActionKeys in your posted example) I'm back to having to hit the Fn key plus the actual function key to invoke the media function, which is just how I like it.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.
~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"


Re: Antivirus

Robin Frost
 

Hi,
while I find Vipre to be reasonably accessible in terms of its installer once up and running there are areas of the program whose accessibility has taken a bit of a hit as compared with earlier versions. It’s served me well over the years and I’m still using it as I haven’t hit upon anything better that’s more accessible.
 
I’ve heard that Kaspersky gets good ratings as these programs go but sadly I’ve found that though once installed the program seems very accessible its installer is absolutely not usable with any screen reader. I took it upon myself to contact them about in hopes that perhaps they’d consider rectifying this. At least I tried.
Robin
 
 

From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:08 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus
 
But the less people know how to protect themselves, the more they need effective antimalware programs.  Yes, user practices are important.  But speaking of myths, there are myths about what sites are safe.  Many small sites, such as small religious sites, often don't have good security precautions and are more dangerous than sites considered dangerous such as pornography sites.  Advertising even on safe sites, may be hacked.  And what about a moment of absent-mindedness?  I am very careful about good practices but once, maybe a year ago, when I wasn't thinking carefully about what I was doing, I followed a link in an e-mail and malware was attempted to be downloaded to my machine.  My antimalware program stopped the download. 
 
Of course, as you say, bad practices endanger machines regardless of what antimalware programs someone is running.  But I don't consider that to be license to not look for good programs.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 10:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus
 

Gene,

            I'm well aware of the many times that both Microsoft Security Essentials and Windows Defender have been "dissed."   Even without questioning the motivations you note yourself that they are "tolerable."

            I'm quite tired of the perpetuation of the myth, and it is a myth, that "the best antivirus software" is what, ultimately, keeps you safe from infection.  People who browse and download carelessly virtually always get infections.   I have to clean them up as part of my living, so I see this up close and personal all the time and a great many of those people have "the best" antivirus and/or security suite programs.  Your best offense against infection is an excellent defense, which means paying attention to where you're traveling in cyberspace and/or what you're downloading.  If whatever program you're using as antivirus doesn't do realtime scanning, particularly of e-mail messages if you're using an e-mail client program, before you can even touch them then you need to be using one that does (and that's the generic "you," not you, personally).

            If accessibility is a concern there are few antivirus programs that are as accessible in all respects as those that come built-in to Windows.  Having the ability to control what you need to control is a lot bigger on the practical needs list than what is "the best" in some bench tester's opinion if you ask me.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

   

 


Re: Antivirus

Gene
 

But the less people know how to protect themselves, the more they need effective antimalware programs.  Yes, user practices are important.  But speaking of myths, there are myths about what sites are safe.  Many small sites, such as small religious sites, often don't have good security precautions and are more dangerous than sites considered dangerous such as pornography sites.  Advertising even on safe sites, may be hacked.  And what about a moment of absent-mindedness?  I am very careful about good practices but once, maybe a year ago, when I wasn't thinking carefully about what I was doing, I followed a link in an e-mail and malware was attempted to be downloaded to my machine.  My antimalware program stopped the download. 
 
Of course, as you say, bad practices endanger machines regardless of what antimalware programs someone is running.  But I don't consider that to be license to not look for good programs.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 10:40 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Gene,

            I'm well aware of the many times that both Microsoft Security Essentials and Windows Defender have been "dissed."   Even without questioning the motivations you note yourself that they are "tolerable."

            I'm quite tired of the perpetuation of the myth, and it is a myth, that "the best antivirus software" is what, ultimately, keeps you safe from infection.  People who browse and download carelessly virtually always get infections.   I have to clean them up as part of my living, so I see this up close and personal all the time and a great many of those people have "the best" antivirus and/or security suite programs.  Your best offense against infection is an excellent defense, which means paying attention to where you're traveling in cyberspace and/or what you're downloading.  If whatever program you're using as antivirus doesn't do realtime scanning, particularly of e-mail messages if you're using an e-mail client program, before you can even touch them then you need to be using one that does (and that's the generic "you," not you, personally).

            If accessibility is a concern there are few antivirus programs that are as accessible in all respects as those that come built-in to Windows.  Having the ability to control what you need to control is a lot bigger on the practical needs list than what is "the best" in some bench tester's opinion if you ask me.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

    



Re: Antivirus

 

Gene,

            I'm well aware of the many times that both Microsoft Security Essentials and Windows Defender have been "dissed."   Even without questioning the motivations you note yourself that they are "tolerable."

            I'm quite tired of the perpetuation of the myth, and it is a myth, that "the best antivirus software" is what, ultimately, keeps you safe from infection.  People who browse and download carelessly virtually always get infections.   I have to clean them up as part of my living, so I see this up close and personal all the time and a great many of those people have "the best" antivirus and/or security suite programs.  Your best offense against infection is an excellent defense, which means paying attention to where you're traveling in cyberspace and/or what you're downloading.  If whatever program you're using as antivirus doesn't do realtime scanning, particularly of e-mail messages if you're using an e-mail client program, before you can even touch them then you need to be using one that does (and that's the generic "you," not you, personally).

            If accessibility is a concern there are few antivirus programs that are as accessible in all respects as those that come built-in to Windows.  Having the ability to control what you need to control is a lot bigger on the practical needs list than what is "the best" in some bench tester's opinion if you ask me.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

    



Re: Antivirus

Gene
 

The resistance comes from a lot of bad publicity both programs got about a year ago as to their effectiveness.  According to what I've read recently, they have improved but they are still not considered as top programs or more than just tolerable.
 
At the time they got the bad publicity, it was contraversial whether they deserved the bad publicity and I'll let those interested look up information.  I wrote about the contraversy at the time and I don't want to go into it all again. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 10:14 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

I really don't get the resistance to either Microsoft Security Essentials or Windows Defender, depending on whether you're running Windows 7 or a later version of Windows, respectively.

Both are accessible and very serviceable antivirus/antimalware programs.  Both offer realtime scanning.  Both allow you to set up exclusions to scanning if a program you know to be legitimate is being picked up as part of their scans.

No antivirus program or security suite is able to protect you from all possible routes of infection.   If you've been interacting with cyberspace for years and aren't routinely getting items quarantined that indicates that your browsing/downloading habits, which are your best defense against infection, are good.   If you're getting frequent identification of infections you definitely need to analyze what you're doing (and most often this is something that comes from operator actions) that is causing this and cease and desist or eventually something will get past whatever you're using.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

    



Re: Antivirus

 

I really don't get the resistance to either Microsoft Security Essentials or Windows Defender, depending on whether you're running Windows 7 or a later version of Windows, respectively.

Both are accessible and very serviceable antivirus/antimalware programs.  Both offer realtime scanning.  Both allow you to set up exclusions to scanning if a program you know to be legitimate is being picked up as part of their scans.

No antivirus program or security suite is able to protect you from all possible routes of infection.   If you've been interacting with cyberspace for years and aren't routinely getting items quarantined that indicates that your browsing/downloading habits, which are your best defense against infection, are good.   If you're getting frequent identification of infections you definitely need to analyze what you're doing (and most often this is something that comes from operator actions) that is causing this and cease and desist or eventually something will get past whatever you're using.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

    



Re: Antivirus

Gene
 

It wasn't totally accessible two or three years ago, which is the older version of the program I am still using.  I haven't heard anything indicating the the program is more accessible now.  Those using the current version may wish to comment.  Based on the older version, the program is useable but not fully accessible.  And, unless you degrade the performance of the program by turning off the self-protection feature, it is completely inaccessible with NVDA.  I consider it better to use the program with a JAWS demo so that it can be used without degrading the program's performance.
 
Avast has a good reputation in terms of the effectiveness of the program among users of free antivirus software.  But, unless the program has changed, it is not fully accessible.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 8:40 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

yes, avast is totally accessible with nvda.

-----Original Message-----
From: Angela Delicata
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 8:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Avast is more or less usable with Jaws, not NVDA.

Best.

Angela from Italy




Il 20/09/2016 13:53, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io ha scritto:
> Hi,
>
>
> It seems to me that the antivirus developers are the less
> accessible-minded people in the software industry.
>
> Until now I have not found an antivirus that can be used with NVDA.
> From totally inaccessible right from the installation to barely
> usable, none of the most famous free antivirus can be used without
> problems.
>
> I am using AVG because at least it can be automatically installed with
> Ninite, but NVDA cannot read the messages dialog, I cannot configure
> the antivirus and every time I install NVDA I need help from someone
> cause AVG "don't like" something and NVDA stops responding.
>
> What are your experiences in this matter?
>
>
>
>
>


---
Questa e-mail è stata controllata per individuare virus con Avast antivirus.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


 




Re: Antivirus

Michael Capelle <mcapelle@...>
 

yes, avast is totally accessible with nvda.

-----Original Message-----
From: Angela Delicata
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 8:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Avast is more or less usable with Jaws, not NVDA.

Best.

Angela from Italy




Il 20/09/2016 13:53, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io ha scritto:
Hi,


It seems to me that the antivirus developers are the less
accessible-minded people in the software industry.

Until now I have not found an antivirus that can be used with NVDA.
From totally inaccessible right from the installation to barely
usable, none of the most famous free antivirus can be used without
problems.

I am using AVG because at least it can be automatically installed with
Ninite, but NVDA cannot read the messages dialog, I cannot configure
the antivirus and every time I install NVDA I need help from someone
cause AVG "don't like" something and NVDA stops responding.

What are your experiences in this matter?





---
Questa e-mail è stata controllata per individuare virus con Avast antivirus.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Antivirus

Angela Delicata
 

Avast is more or less usable with Jaws, not NVDA.

Best.

Angela from Italy




Il 20/09/2016 13:53, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io ha scritto:
Hi,


It seems to me that the antivirus developers are the less
accessible-minded people in the software industry.

Until now I have not found an antivirus that can be used with NVDA.
From totally inaccessible right from the installation to barely
usable, none of the most famous free antivirus can be used without
problems.

I am using AVG because at least it can be automatically installed with
Ninite, but NVDA cannot read the messages dialog, I cannot configure
the antivirus and every time I install NVDA I need help from someone
cause AVG "don't like" something and NVDA stops responding.

What are your experiences in this matter?




---
Questa e-mail è stata controllata per individuare virus con Avast antivirus.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Antivirus

Salva Doménech Miguel <kibayasd@...>
 

hi. Yep, Utorrent is the problema. The only problem.

El 20 sept 2016, a las 14:01, Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@...> escribió:

Hmm. I can use Utorrent fine, the list of things downloading isn't able to be tabbed to, but that's my only problem.

Devin Pratersent from Gmail.

On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 6:59 AM, Salva Doménech Miguel via Groups.io <kibayasd@...> wrote:
Hi.

I’m now ussing Eset SmartSecurity 9, and it’s a very big shit. The 8 version was more or less accessible but my it upgrades automatically to 9 version. After, I have used Microsoft Security Essentials (a very good antivirus) in Windows 7, but in Windows 10 the Windows Defender locks me some aplications like Utorrent, cause of that i changed to Eset. I’m also looking for a good antivirus for Windows.

Cheers.

> El 20 sept 2016, a las 13:53, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io <wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> escribió:
>
> Hi,
>
>
> It seems to me that the antivirus developers are the less accessible-minded people in the software industry.
>
> Until now I have not found an antivirus that can be used with NVDA. From totally inaccessible right from the installation to barely usable, none of the most famous free antivirus can be used without problems.
>
> I am using AVG because at least it can be automatically installed with Ninite, but NVDA cannot read the messages dialog, I cannot configure the antivirus and every time I install NVDA I need help from someone cause AVG "don't like" something and NVDA stops responding.
>
> What are your experiences in this matter?
>
>
>
>
>







Re: Antivirus

Devin Prater
 

Hmm. I can use Utorrent fine, the list of things downloading isn't able to be tabbed to, but that's my only problem.

Devin Pratersent from Gmail.

On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 6:59 AM, Salva Doménech Miguel via Groups.io <kibayasd@...> wrote:
Hi.

I’m now ussing Eset SmartSecurity 9, and it’s a very big shit. The 8 version was more or less accessible but my it upgrades automatically to 9 version. After, I have used Microsoft Security Essentials (a very good antivirus) in Windows 7, but in Windows 10 the Windows Defender locks me some aplications like Utorrent, cause of that i changed to Eset. I’m also looking for a good antivirus for Windows.

Cheers.

> El 20 sept 2016, a las 13:53, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io <wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> escribió:
>
> Hi,
>
>
> It seems to me that the antivirus developers are the less accessible-minded people in the software industry.
>
> Until now I have not found an antivirus that can be used with NVDA. From totally inaccessible right from the installation to barely usable, none of the most famous free antivirus can be used without problems.
>
> I am using AVG because at least it can be automatically installed with Ninite, but NVDA cannot read the messages dialog, I cannot configure the antivirus and every time I install NVDA I need help from someone cause AVG "don't like" something and NVDA stops responding.
>
> What are your experiences in this matter?
>
>
>
>
>