Date   

Re: Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

 

hello,
pressing nvda+shift+space make single letter navigation on and off.

On 9/27/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
The message states that the page can be moved around with the arrow keys.
If the browser were in focus mode, you couldn't move around using the arrow
keys. But to avoid any possible confusion, when speaking of the arrow keys,
are you referring to the actual arrow keys or the numpad keys?

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Chris Mullins
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:52 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer


You need to be in browse mode for quick keys and it sounds like you are in
focus mode. Try pressing NVDA+space to switch modes.



Cheers

Chris



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan
Mann
Sent: 26 September 2016 22:45
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer



Does anybody know why Quick Keys such as B for button or h for heading
wouldn't work in Internet Explorer? I set up NVDA on somebody's computer
and I'm able to navigate Internet Explorer using the arrow keys. However,
when I try to hit h to go by heading or b to find the next button, NVDA just
says h or b. I tried it on a couple different web pages.




Sent from my iPhone


--
we have not sent you but as a mercy to the creation.
holy quran, chapter 21, verse 107.
best website for studying islamic book in different languages
al-islam.org


Re: Yahoo password

Gary Bowers <gdbowers@...>
 

Melissa ,

You are absolutely correct.

You answered the question in a way that allowed anyone to use any preferred additional navigational skills.

You gave them the roadmap.

Gary

Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:59 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't know this person very well so I don't know their level of understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and the time spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home
page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you
get to the right one? or if you know the field you are looking for is
an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the
letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.
If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get
there just as you can with the letter f.

If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in,
you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for
what you think might be correct. If you are talking about moving to
something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may
not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste
an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these
methods. I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password


What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it.
The Yahoo accessibility help is useless....






FW: Windows 10 and NVDA

Anthony Bernard <par-avion@...>
 

      _____________________________________________

From: Anthony Bernard [mailto:par-avion@...]
Sent: 27 September 2016 07:29
To: 'nvda@...'
Subject: Windows 10 and NVDA
Importance: High

Hello, recently I started to use an HP Pro book  core 85 with NVDA
 2016.3.  When I press the application key or Shift +F10 NVDA does not announce anything such as open, properties, rename, etc.  But The screen displays these elements.  Have you encountered this problem?  Do you know of any solution?  I will appreciate your reply       

Anthony Bernard


Re: Yahoo password

Gene
 

This is a rather long message but it may have information some will find useful. 
 
I may, but if I do, it's because I have no idea how many people may be following a thread.  Someone may explain why they do something and others may find the explanation convincing and not try other approaches.  but if they see someone vigorously presenting another method, they may continue to consider it.  I have strong feelings on this subject.  I have seen, for about fifteen years, since I started looking at how blind people use the Internet, a lot of blind people doing things very inefficiently and having needless problems finding things on web sites.  I see how small changes in a web site cause many blind people to be unable to use it.  for example, one wegb site changed a download link to a download button and, on another list, people would say they could no longer download using the site.  Things may be changing.  Perhaps there is better instructional material available these days.  But, for example, when I go to a radio station site, I don't look around the site if I only want to listen to the audio stream.  I search, from the top of the site for the word live since so many sites have a link that uses the word live.  When I want to contact someone at a site, I search for the word contact.  I'm not saying people shouldn't look at sites in detail.  There are times when I do because I either can't find what I want in my usual ways or because I want to learn about whatever the site is offering and discussing.  And, of course, people are free to do whatever they want, regardless of my opinion.  But I save an enormous amount of time by using efficient navigation.  I don't know what is available these days from free resources such as the Hadley School or how much need there is for this but perhaps information on the NVDA site should include a tutorial for using the Internet effectively.  I don't want to rewrite my tutorial to modernize it but I've offered it to anyone who wants to use it as a basis for their work. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
I didn't just think about this.  I produced a tutorial many years ago that emphasized, more than anything else, effective Internet navigation.  The editorial may still be useful but it would have to be updated to discuss newer features in screen-readers. 
But effective Internet use is one of my special interests.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Re: Yahoo password

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Re: Yahoo password

Gene
 

Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>



Re: Yahoo password

 

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.

On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
right one? or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
the first edit field from the top of the page. If it isn't the right one,
you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
letter f.

If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
think might be correct. If you are talking about moving to something that
is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
because they don't know or use these methods. I am not assuming my
suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password


What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
Yahoo accessibility help is useless....






Re: NVDA remote access.

Igor Kaplan
 

Well, verified today, my configs are definitely used on the security screens
and after the security screen is on the status of remote access plugin is
"connected", however no access at all.
However, if I go to the Remote Access menu, disconnect and then connect
again, right on the lock screen, it works perfectly. It continue to work
after the computer is unlocked, however again stops after the computer is
locked. So, looks like the NVDA attempts to reconnect on the security
screen, I even hear the long beep, the indication of connection, however
there is probably something, which does not let NVDA to connect properly.
I wonder, if connections attempts are recorded to the NVDA log, I could
probably attempt to debug sometime.

All the best.

Igor.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Go to the NVDA menu Preferences/General, there is a button labelled 'Use
current settings on log-on and other secure screens' to copy them over. You
will require admin priviledges to perform this routine.

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony
Stone
Sent: 25 September 2016 23:59
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

How does one "copy this set-up to the secure screen settings"?

Antony.

On Monday 26 September 2016 at 00:50:58, Chris Mullins wrote:

The way I understand it is that when your work computer drops into the
secure screen it drops your user NVDA settings and loads the secure
screen NVDA settings. So if you have the remote add-on with
auto-connect set for your user NVDA settings and copy this set-up to
the secure screen settings, your work computer will drop its remote
connection when the secure screen appears but immediately re-establish
it when the secure screen NVDA settings are loaded. Similarly, when
you log into your work computer, the remote connection will drop again
and reconnect when your user NVDA settings are loaded. Your local
computer shows as being connected but this only indicates that it is
connected to the host server, not your work computer.

Cheers

Chris
--
Schrödinger's rule of data: the condition of any backup is unknown until a
restore is attempted.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC
me.


Re: Announcing ObjPad add-on, a more intuitive way to navigate between screen elements

Andre Fisher
 

There is no script documentation for the keyboard shortcut. Could one
be implemented, and placed in the Input gestures dialog?

On 9/26/16, Fatma Mehanna <fatma.mehanna@gmail.com> wrote:
hi,
i have just used this addon and found a small notice:
sometimes i forget what mode i'm using, so i find nvda says strange
things not the strings i expect to be announced and i remember that
i'm in one of the addon modes :)
thanks.

On 9/26/16, Ângelo Abrantes <ampa4374@gmail.com> wrote:
I'm begining to work with the addon. I think that's a good idea.

If necessary, I can translate it into europian portuguese.

Ângelo Abrantes



Às 18:12 de 26-09-2016, Joseph Lee escreveu:

Hi everyone,

One of the strengths of NVDA is superb support for object navigation.
However, there were requests from people who wanted a more intuitive
way to do this, including using just the arrow keys to navigate
between objects, and since early this year, a way for NVDA to have
something similar to scan mode in Narrator (Windows 10 version 1607).
The wait is over: introducing ObjPad, an add-on that introduces more
intuitive object navigation facility and basic implementation of scan
mode feature, along with possibilities such as one key command to move
focus to the current navigator object and more planned for the future.

The add-on (for now, a development snapshot) can be found at:

http://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/objPad.en.html

Feedback is appreciated.

Cheers,

Joseph



---
Este e-mail foi verificado em termos de vírus pelo software antivírus
Avast.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus



Re: Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

Gene
 

The message states that the page can be moved around with the arrow keys.  If the browser were in focus mode, you couldn't move around using the arrow keys.  But to avoid any possible confusion, when speaking of the arrow keys, are you referring to the actual arrow keys or the numpad keys?
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:52 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

You need to be in browse mode for quick keys and it sounds like you are in focus mode.  Try pressing NVDA+space to switch modes.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Mann
Sent: 26 September 2016 22:45
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

 

Does anybody know why Quick Keys such as B for button or h for heading wouldn't work in Internet Explorer?  I set up NVDA on somebody's computer and I'm able to navigate Internet Explorer using the arrow keys.  However, when I try to hit h to go by heading or b to find the next button, NVDA just says h or b.  I tried it on a couple different web pages.

 


Sent from my iPhone


Re: Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

Gene
 

You can try it but I doubt it will work in a browser.  As far as I know, that is a command used in Microsoft Word when you want to turn on and off quick navigation keys when working in Word.  Having this command available in a browser would create confusion and add no needed option for working in a browser.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

Insert Z will toggle Quick Nav Keys on and off. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Mann
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 2:45 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

 

Does anybody know why Quick Keys such as B for button or h for heading wouldn't work in Internet Explorer?  I set up NVDA on somebody's computer and I'm able to navigate Internet Explorer using the arrow keys.  However, when I try to hit h to go by heading or b to find the next button, NVDA just says h or b.  I tried it on a couple different web pages.

 


Sent from my iPhone


Re: Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

Chris Mullins
 

You need to be in browse mode for quick keys and it sounds like you are in focus mode.  Try pressing NVDA+space to switch modes.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Mann
Sent: 26 September 2016 22:45
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

 

Does anybody know why Quick Keys such as B for button or h for heading wouldn't work in Internet Explorer?  I set up NVDA on somebody's computer and I'm able to navigate Internet Explorer using the arrow keys.  However, when I try to hit h to go by heading or b to find the next button, NVDA just says h or b.  I tried it on a couple different web pages.

 


Sent from my iPhone


Re: Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

Albert Ruel
 

Insert Z will toggle Quick Nav Keys on and off. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Mann
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 2:45 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

 

Does anybody know why Quick Keys such as B for button or h for heading wouldn't work in Internet Explorer?  I set up NVDA on somebody's computer and I'm able to navigate Internet Explorer using the arrow keys.  However, when I try to hit h to go by heading or b to find the next button, NVDA just says h or b.  I tried it on a couple different web pages.

 


Sent from my iPhone


Quick keys not working in Internet Explorer

Ryan Mann <rmann0581@...>
 

Does anybody know why Quick Keys such as B for button or h for heading wouldn't work in Internet Explorer?  I set up NVDA on somebody's computer and I'm able to navigate Internet Explorer using the arrow keys.  However, when I try to hit h to go by heading or b to find the next button, NVDA just says h or b.  I tried it on a couple different web pages.


Sent from my iPhone


Re: Yahoo password

Gene
 

Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the letter f. 
 
If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.  But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata@...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>
> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>
> How can I do it in the web site?
>
> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>
>
>
>
>



Re: Yahoo password

 

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
Yahoo accessibility help is useless....





Re: Announcing ObjPad add-on, a more intuitive way to navigate between screen elements

Fatma Mehanna
 

hi,
i have just used this addon and found a small notice:
sometimes i forget what mode i'm using, so i find nvda says strange
things not the strings i expect to be announced and i remember that
i'm in one of the addon modes :)
thanks.

On 9/26/16, Ângelo Abrantes <ampa4374@gmail.com> wrote:
I'm begining to work with the addon. I think that's a good idea.

If necessary, I can translate it into europian portuguese.

Ângelo Abrantes



Às 18:12 de 26-09-2016, Joseph Lee escreveu:

Hi everyone,

One of the strengths of NVDA is superb support for object navigation.
However, there were requests from people who wanted a more intuitive
way to do this, including using just the arrow keys to navigate
between objects, and since early this year, a way for NVDA to have
something similar to scan mode in Narrator (Windows 10 version 1607).
The wait is over: introducing ObjPad, an add-on that introduces more
intuitive object navigation facility and basic implementation of scan
mode feature, along with possibilities such as one key command to move
focus to the current navigator object and more planned for the future.

The add-on (for now, a development snapshot) can be found at:

http://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/objPad.en.html

Feedback is appreciated.

Cheers,

Joseph



---
Este e-mail foi verificado em termos de vírus pelo software antivírus
Avast.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Issue with screen after copying plugins into system profile

Mallard
 

Sorry people,

It looks as if, after restarting NVDA, the problem stopped. I hope that's the case.


However, I notice that now I no longer have a "Secure desktop" notification, and therefore I'm not aware of the request to authorize an app to be installed, for instance.

Ciao,

Ollie

Il 26/09/2016 21:43, Mallard ha scritto:
Hello list,

I chose to use saved configuration settings in the Logon Window, and copied the necessary plugins into system profile.
Since I work with my monitor turned off, I didn't realised that this new configuration gives problems with the screen. Every so often, I hear the sound that Windows makes when a device is disconnected; the screen goes black, and after a couple of seconds I hear the sound again, and the screen comes on. That happens constantly, and I c an only think this may be caused by that change in configuration.

How can I go back to previous settings?

Which plugins are copied into the system profile, and where can i find such profile?

Sorry for these silly questions, but I've never done that before.

Thanks for your help.
Ciao,
Ollie

ps: I forgot to mention that I'm running the latest version of Windows, and the latest Next snapshot of NVDA.



Issue with screen after copying plugins into system profile

Mallard
 

Hello list,

I chose to use saved configuration settings in the Logon Window, and copied the necessary plugins into system profile.
Since I work with my monitor turned off, I didn't realised that this new configuration gives problems with the screen. Every so often, I hear the sound that Windows makes when a device is disconnected; the screen goes black, and after a couple of seconds I hear the sound again, and the screen comes on. That happens constantly, and I c an only think this may be caused by that change in configuration.

How can I go back to previous settings?

Which plugins are copied into the system profile, and where can i find such profile?

Sorry for these silly questions, but I've never done that before.

Thanks for your help.
Ciao,
Ollie

ps: I forgot to mention that I'm running the latest version of Windows, and the latest Next snapshot of NVDA.


Re: Announcing ObjPad add-on, a more intuitive way to navigate between screen elements

Ângelo Abrantes
 

I'm begining to work with the addon. I think that's a good idea.

If necessary, I can translate it into europian portuguese.

Ângelo Abrantes



Às 18:12 de 26-09-2016, Joseph Lee escreveu:

Hi everyone,

 

One of the strengths of NVDA is superb support for object navigation. However, there were requests from people who wanted a more intuitive way to do this, including using just the arrow keys to navigate between objects, and since early this year, a way for NVDA to have something similar to scan mode in Narrator (Windows 10 version 1607). The wait is over: introducing ObjPad, an add-on that introduces more intuitive object navigation facility and basic implementation of scan mode feature, along with possibilities such as one key command to move focus to the current navigator object and more planned for the future.

 

The add-on (for now, a development snapshot) can be found at:

http://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/objPad.en.html

 

Feedback is appreciated.

Cheers,

Joseph





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