Date   

NVDA remote access.

Chris Mullins
 

Igor
On my last post, please ignore "1. The W10 machine did not output any speech
locally but I can hear everything at the remote end. unlike when I connect
to my friends machine which speaks locally and I can hear everything at the
remote end". I hadn't realised I had a headphone extension wire plugged
into the machine which muted the sound.

I have now done a test logging out and into an account over a remote
connection and it works perfectly. I first had to re-copy my settings over
to the system settings having first set the autoconnect parameters. Just to
be sure we are on the same page, could you describe your understanding of
'autoconnect parameters'?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: 27 September 2016 17:12
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Hi Igor
If you set logging to 'Info', you can see where remote connections occur.
However, I've tried to replicate your set-up and run some tests. To
simulate your work machine, I have used a windows 10 machine with nvda
2016.3 installed and have set remote to autoconnect. To simulate your home
machine, I have used an old XP laptop with nvda2014.4 installed and used
the remote dialog to manually connect it as the controlling computer to my
Windows 10 machine. It gave the long sound when I connected to the already
logged-in account on the W10 machine. I could access the W10 machine
perfectly and successfully locked the screen and logged back in again,
maintaining the remote connection.

I regularly connect to a friend's machine but we use the remote dialog to
specify the host and key parameters butthis is the first time I've used
autoconnect and I noticed a couple of differences between the connection
methods.
1. The W10 machine did not output any speech locally but I can hear
everything at the remote end. unlike when I connect to my friends machine
which speaks locally and I can hear everything at the remote end.
2. When I lock the screen, I don't hear the descending chime of nvda exit or
the ascending chime of NVDA load when I unlock my account with the log-in
password. logging in/out of an account I suspect behaves differently and I
will test this behaviour next.

With the behavior in 2 above in mind, could you leve your work machine on
the lock screen rather than the log-in screen to enable remote access or are
there group policies in effect which would prevent you doing this?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Igor
Kaplan
Sent: 27 September 2016 10:55
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Yes, I do, and it shows "connected" on the lock screen.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 5:44 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

And you definitely have autoconnect enabled?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Igor
Kaplan
Sent: 26 September 2016 23:46
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Well, verified today, my configs are definitely used on the security screens
and after the security screen is on the status of remote access plugin is
"connected", however no access at all.
However, if I go to the Remote Access menu, disconnect and then connect
again, right on the lock screen, it works perfectly. It continue to work
after the computer is unlocked, however again stops after the computer is
locked. So, looks like the NVDA attempts to reconnect on the security
screen, I even hear the long beep, the indication of connection, however
there is probably something, which does not let NVDA to connect properly.
I wonder, if connections attempts are recorded to the NVDA log, I could
probably attempt to debug sometime.

All the best.

Igor.
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Go to the NVDA menu Preferences/General, there is a button labelled 'Use
current settings on log-on and other secure screens' to copy them over. You
will require admin priviledges to perform this routine.

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony
Stone
Sent: 25 September 2016 23:59
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

How does one "copy this set-up to the secure screen settings"?

Antony.

On Monday 26 September 2016 at 00:50:58, Chris Mullins wrote:

The way I understand it is that when your work computer drops into the
secure screen it drops your user NVDA settings and loads the secure
screen NVDA settings. So if you have the remote add-on with
auto-connect set for your user NVDA settings and copy this set-up to
the secure screen settings, your work computer will drop its remote
connection when the secure screen appears but immediately re-establish
it when the secure screen NVDA settings are loaded. Similarly, when
you log into your work computer, the remote connection will drop again
and reconnect when your user NVDA settings are loaded. Your local
computer shows as being connected but this only indicates that it is
connected to the host server, not your work computer.

Cheers

Chris
--
Schrödinger's rule of data: the condition of any backup is unknown until a
restore is attempted.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC
me.


Re: FW: [win10] nvda and corrupted config file

Gene
 

When you  know the file hasn't been corrupted, copy it somewhere else.  Then copy it back to it's current location when it becomes corrupted.  I suppose you could create a batch file so you could automate this but it appears that the real inconvenience is having to create all the settings again manually.  That doesn't solve the problem of why the file becomes corrupted or how to prevent it but it would save a lot of time configuring NVDA repeatedly. 
 
Also, I doubt this would help and you wouldn't be able to change any settings or add any but you could try making the ini file a read only file.  I doubt that will stop it from becoming corrupted but it may be worth trying.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 11:40 AM
Subject: [nvda] FW: [win10] nvda and corrupted config file

Hi,
Can anyone provide a more easy to use answer apart from deleting nvda.ini
file? Thanks.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Scott VanDeWalle
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 9:35 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] nvda and corrupted config file

Hi all, probably wrong list but i do not want to subscribe to the nvda list
just to ask a question if i'm on a list that perhaps may already know, esp
Joseph.

The latest occurrence of this just happened last night and its like the
third or fourth time this has happened.
I'm using the anniversary update with nvda.
Occasionally nvda will just stop talking to me and when i restart either the
computer or nvda, i'm told the configuration file is corrupted.
I then have to go back and set every single one of my preferences again.
Any idea why, and how do i back up my configuration file so i do not need to
do this each time.
Thank you

Have a nice day everyone.

Scott






FW: [win10] nvda and corrupted config file

 

Hi,
Can anyone provide a more easy to use answer apart from deleting nvda.ini
file? Thanks.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Scott VanDeWalle
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 9:35 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] nvda and corrupted config file

Hi all, probably wrong list but i do not want to subscribe to the nvda list
just to ask a question if i'm on a list that perhaps may already know, esp
Joseph.

The latest occurrence of this just happened last night and its like the
third or fourth time this has happened.
I'm using the anniversary update with nvda.
Occasionally nvda will just stop talking to me and when i restart either the
computer or nvda, i'm told the configuration file is corrupted.
I then have to go back and set every single one of my preferences again.
Any idea why, and how do i back up my configuration file so i do not need to
do this each time.
Thank you

Have a nice day everyone.

Scott


Re: NVDA remote access.

Chris Mullins
 

Hi Igor
If you set logging to 'Info', you can see where remote connections occur.
However, I've tried to replicate your set-up and run some tests. To
simulate your work machine, I have used a windows 10 machine with nvda
2016.3 installed and have set remote to autoconnect. To simulate your home
machine, I have used an old XP laptop with nvda2014.4 installed and used
the remote dialog to manually connect it as the controlling computer to my
Windows 10 machine. It gave the long sound when I connected to the already
logged-in account on the W10 machine. I could access the W10 machine
perfectly and successfully locked the screen and logged back in again,
maintaining the remote connection.

I regularly connect to a friend's machine but we use the remote dialog to
specify the host and key parameters butthis is the first time I've used
autoconnect and I noticed a couple of differences between the connection
methods.
1. The W10 machine did not output any speech locally but I can hear
everything at the remote end. unlike when I connect to my friends machine
which speaks locally and I can hear everything at the remote end.
2. When I lock the screen, I don't hear the descending chime of nvda exit or
the ascending chime of NVDA load when I unlock my account with the log-in
password. logging in/out of an account I suspect behaves differently and I
will test this behaviour next.

With the behavior in 2 above in mind, could you leve your work machine on
the lock screen rather than the log-in screen to enable remote access or are
there group policies in effect which would prevent you doing this?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Igor
Kaplan
Sent: 27 September 2016 10:55
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Yes, I do, and it shows "connected" on the lock screen.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 5:44 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

And you definitely have autoconnect enabled?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Igor
Kaplan
Sent: 26 September 2016 23:46
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Well, verified today, my configs are definitely used on the security screens
and after the security screen is on the status of remote access plugin is
"connected", however no access at all.
However, if I go to the Remote Access menu, disconnect and then connect
again, right on the lock screen, it works perfectly. It continue to work
after the computer is unlocked, however again stops after the computer is
locked. So, looks like the NVDA attempts to reconnect on the security
screen, I even hear the long beep, the indication of connection, however
there is probably something, which does not let NVDA to connect properly.
I wonder, if connections attempts are recorded to the NVDA log, I could
probably attempt to debug sometime.

All the best.

Igor.
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Go to the NVDA menu Preferences/General, there is a button labelled 'Use
current settings on log-on and other secure screens' to copy them over. You
will require admin priviledges to perform this routine.

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony
Stone
Sent: 25 September 2016 23:59
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

How does one "copy this set-up to the secure screen settings"?

Antony.

On Monday 26 September 2016 at 00:50:58, Chris Mullins wrote:

The way I understand it is that when your work computer drops into the
secure screen it drops your user NVDA settings and loads the secure
screen NVDA settings. So if you have the remote add-on with
auto-connect set for your user NVDA settings and copy this set-up to
the secure screen settings, your work computer will drop its remote
connection when the secure screen appears but immediately re-establish
it when the secure screen NVDA settings are loaded. Similarly, when
you log into your work computer, the remote connection will drop again
and reconnect when your user NVDA settings are loaded. Your local
computer shows as being connected but this only indicates that it is
connected to the host server, not your work computer.

Cheers

Chris
--
Schrödinger's rule of data: the condition of any backup is unknown until a
restore is attempted.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC
me.


Re: Yahoo password

Gene
 

I was commenting on your other comments, but we'll see if someone can tell you how this is done, if it can be done by a blind person.  I used to have an account for e-mail groups on Yahoo but something seems to have happened to the account.  It appears my e-mail address is no longer recognized.  I'll play around a bit more but I doubt I'll get another account.  Of course, you could get sighted assistance or, maybe, Yahoo will help blind peple if an individual asks for help. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 7:20 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,

Work efficiently within a web page is not a problem to me.

I even buy and sell shares and other types of investments in home brokers and the shortcuts for the tags are well documented in my brain...

If the site changes entirely, it will be only a question of learning the new structure and in no time I will be navigating rapidly again.

You are right in the fact that people must know the keystrokes to navigate web pages, but Yahoo Mail is one of those rare cases we are in front of a problem of pure lack of accessibility.
I suggest you to enter in Yahoo Mail (if you don't' have an e-mail there, create one) and after try to change the password.
Then tell me how you did it. Only this will answer my original question...
Try and see if you can do it...
                                   
Best regards.
Walmir

PS: Thanks, Thunderbird.

Em 26/09/2016 21:15, Gene escreveu:
This is a rather long message but it may have information some will find useful. 
 
I may, but if I do, it's because I have no idea how many people may be following a thread.  Someone may explain why they do something and others may find the explanation convincing and not try other approaches.  but if they see someone vigorously presenting another method, they may continue to consider it.  I have strong feelings on this subject.  I have seen, for about fifteen years, since I started looking at how blind people use the Internet, a lot of blind people doing things very inefficiently and having needless problems finding things on web sites.  I see how small changes in a web site cause many blind people to be unable to use it.  for example, one wegb site changed a download link to a download button and, on another list, people would say they could no longer download using the site.  Things may be changing.  Perhaps there is better instructional material available these days.  But, for example, when I go to a radio station site, I don't look around the site if I only want to listen to the audio stream.  I search, from the top of the site for the word live since so many sites have a link that uses the word live.  When I want to contact someone at a site, I search for the word contact.  I'm not saying people shouldn't look at sites in detail.  There are times when I do because I either can't find what I want in my usual ways or because I want to learn about whatever the site is offering and discussing.  And, of course, people are free to do whatever they want, regardless of my opinion.  But I save an enormous amount of time by using efficient navigation.  I don't know what is available these days from free resources such as the Hadley School or how much need there is for this but perhaps information on the NVDA site should include a tutorial for using the Internet effectively.  I don't want to rewrite my tutorial to modernize it but I've offered it to anyone who wants to use it as a basis for their work. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
I didn't just think about this.  I produced a tutorial many years ago that emphasized, more than anything else, effective Internet navigation.  The editorial may still be useful but it would have to be updated to discuss newer features in screen-readers. 
But effective Internet use is one of my special interests.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>





Yahoo Mail Password: answering my oun question

Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi, all,

I will answer my own question.

The problem with Yahoo Mail it is simply tricky to use, to not say its inaccessible.

To change the password it's necessary to navigate to the "help" menu and then find the "My account" option.

The difficulty is that the menu buttons must be activated withe ENTER and the menu items MUST be accessed with TAB key. Arrows don't work, "k" don't work.

To worse things a little more, to activate the menu item, it's necessary to be in edit mode, not in browse mode. So, it's necessary to use NVDA+SPACE. I suggest to do this right before arriving at the ""Help" menu.

It's a mess, an accessibility nightmare.


Re: Yahoo password

Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi, Gene,

Work efficiently within a web page is not a problem to me.

I even buy and sell shares and other types of investments in home brokers and the shortcuts for the tags are well documented in my brain...

If the site changes entirely, it will be only a question of learning the new structure and in no time I will be navigating rapidly again.

You are right in the fact that people must know the keystrokes to navigate web pages, but Yahoo Mail is one of those rare cases we are in front of a problem of pure lack of accessibility.
I suggest you to enter in Yahoo Mail (if you don't' have an e-mail there, create one) and after try to change the password.
Then tell me how you did it. Only this will answer my original question...
Try and see if you can do it...
                                   
Best regards.
Walmir

PS: Thanks, Thunderbird.

Em 26/09/2016 21:15, Gene escreveu:

This is a rather long message but it may have information some will find useful. 
 
I may, but if I do, it's because I have no idea how many people may be following a thread.  Someone may explain why they do something and others may find the explanation convincing and not try other approaches.  but if they see someone vigorously presenting another method, they may continue to consider it.  I have strong feelings on this subject.  I have seen, for about fifteen years, since I started looking at how blind people use the Internet, a lot of blind people doing things very inefficiently and having needless problems finding things on web sites.  I see how small changes in a web site cause many blind people to be unable to use it.  for example, one wegb site changed a download link to a download button and, on another list, people would say they could no longer download using the site.  Things may be changing.  Perhaps there is better instructional material available these days.  But, for example, when I go to a radio station site, I don't look around the site if I only want to listen to the audio stream.  I search, from the top of the site for the word live since so many sites have a link that uses the word live.  When I want to contact someone at a site, I search for the word contact.  I'm not saying people shouldn't look at sites in detail.  There are times when I do because I either can't find what I want in my usual ways or because I want to learn about whatever the site is offering and discussing.  And, of course, people are free to do whatever they want, regardless of my opinion.  But I save an enormous amount of time by using efficient navigation.  I don't know what is available these days from free resources such as the Hadley School or how much need there is for this but perhaps information on the NVDA site should include a tutorial for using the Internet effectively.  I don't want to rewrite my tutorial to modernize it but I've offered it to anyone who wants to use it as a basis for their work. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
I didn't just think about this.  I produced a tutorial many years ago that emphasized, more than anything else, effective Internet navigation.  The editorial may still be useful but it would have to be updated to discuss newer features in screen-readers. 
But effective Internet use is one of my special interests.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>





signing PDF documents?

Robert Kingett <kingettspeaks@...>
 

I am a freelance writer and need to sign quite a bit of PDF documents. Now that I am newly totally blind is there a service online that will do this or a method using software? Thanks in advance! Before, I could use magnification but now I cannot.



Re: Yahoo password

Gene
 

I suspect that in The United States, especially among sites that aren't among the most popularly used by blind people, that the problem you are describing also often exists.  And since NVDA is used by the international community, your comments make an even stronger case for my impression that good Internet instruction is likely far too uncommon.  The kind of skills you are discussing should be taught.  You never know when you'll need them.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 6:38 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,

Really, edit fields normally have a description that NVDA announces.

But, here in Brazil we have many sites that don't do this job.

What we have to do, as you said, is to use NVDA+SPACE to change for the browse mode and use arrows keys to investigate what information is being asked for.

This is not a problem when the user knows how to use the screen reader efficiently, but is annoying.

That shows us how far we are of a really accessible web design.

Yahoo Mail is especially difficult to use. They say that they are using widgets instead of tags, but that is a fallacy, because buttons, check boxes, links are all there and the use of the page with a screen reader becomes stressing, to say the least.

Em 26/09/2016 20:10, Gene escreveu:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Re: Announcing ObjPad add-on, a more intuitive way to navigate between screen elements

Christopher Bartlett
 

What is scan mode?  I don't use narrator as a rule and am unfamiliar with this feature.

Chris Bartlett


On Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 6:43 PM, Andre Fisher <andrefisher729@...> wrote:
There is no script documentation for the keyboard shortcut. Could one
be implemented, and placed in the Input gestures dialog?

On 9/26/16, Fatma Mehanna <fatma.mehanna@...> wrote:
> hi,
> i have just used this addon and found a small notice:
> sometimes i forget what mode i'm using, so i find nvda says strange
> things not the strings i expect to be announced and i remember that
> i'm in one of the addon modes :)
> thanks.
>
> On 9/26/16, Ângelo Abrantes <ampa4374@...> wrote:
>> I'm begining to work with the addon. I think that's a good idea.
>>
>> If necessary, I can translate it into europian portuguese.
>>
>> Ângelo Abrantes
>>
>>
>>
>> Às 18:12 de 26-09-2016, Joseph Lee escreveu:
>>>
>>> Hi everyone,
>>>
>>> One of the strengths of NVDA is superb support for object navigation.
>>> However, there were requests from people who wanted a more intuitive
>>> way to do this, including using just the arrow keys to navigate
>>> between objects, and since early this year, a way for NVDA to have
>>> something similar to scan mode in Narrator (Windows 10 version 1607).
>>> The wait is over: introducing ObjPad, an add-on that introduces more
>>> intuitive object navigation facility and basic implementation of scan
>>> mode feature, along with possibilities such as one key command to move
>>> focus to the current navigator object and more planned for the future.
>>>
>>> The add-on (for now, a development snapshot) can be found at:
>>>
>>> http://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/objPad.en.html
>>>
>>> Feedback is appreciated.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>>
>>> Joseph
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> Este e-mail foi verificado em termos de vírus pelo software antivírus
>> Avast.
>> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>>
>
>
>
>






--
Christopher Bartlett


Re: Yahoo password

Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

It's true.

All of us develop our own strategies to navigate web pages.

If the page is well designed, there will be no correct or wrong way to do things, but only those ways that each person think are the best.


Em 26/09/2016 20:41, Rosemarie Chavarria escreveu:

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>





Re: Yahoo password

Gene
 

I occasionally used the Yahoo site years ago, long before the modern site interface.  We'll see what kinds of responses you get. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 6:21 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,

I agree with you that one must know how to navigate using shortcuts like "h", "e", "b", "k", etc.

But, in my case, I am not wasting my time for lack of knowledge of hoe o use NVDA, but because the mess Yahoo Mail is.

Sign in is not the problem. I am trying to change my password, so it's clear that I am already logged in.

In Yahoo Mail, even activate a menu option is tricky. The menu is composed of buttons, so I can arrive at it with "b". But there is no option to change password, even on the configuration link on the Help menu.



Em 26/09/2016 18:36, Gene escreveu:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the letter f. 
 
If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.  But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata@...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>
> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>
> How can I do it in the web site?
>
> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>
>
>
>
>




Re: Yahoo password

Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi, Gene,

Really, edit fields normally have a description that NVDA announces.

But, here in Brazil we have many sites that don't do this job.

What we have to do, as you said, is to use NVDA+SPACE to change for the browse mode and use arrows keys to investigate what information is being asked for.

This is not a problem when the user knows how to use the screen reader efficiently, but is annoying.

That shows us how far we are of a really accessible web design.

Yahoo Mail is especially difficult to use. They say that they are using widgets instead of tags, but that is a fallacy, because buttons, check boxes, links are all there and the use of the page with a screen reader becomes stressing, to say the least.

Em 26/09/2016 20:10, Gene escreveu:

Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




obj pad addon

Josh Kennedy
 

hi joseph,

could you add a way to reclass objects using a dialog and also give objects your own more meaningful labels? jaws and window eyes can do this already this is an area where NVDA could catch up. also maybe use tooltips in some way to help label and reclass objects if available.



--
mozilla thunderbird email client


Re: Yahoo password

Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi, Gene,

I agree with you that one must know how to navigate using shortcuts like "h", "e", "b", "k", etc.

But, in my case, I am not wasting my time for lack of knowledge of hoe o use NVDA, but because the mess Yahoo Mail is.

Sign in is not the problem. I am trying to change my password, so it's clear that I am already logged in.

In Yahoo Mail, even activate a menu option is tricky. The menu is composed of buttons, so I can arrive at it with "b". But there is no option to change password, even on the configuration link on the Help menu.



Em 26/09/2016 18:36, Gene escreveu:

Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the letter f. 
 
If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.  But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata@...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>
> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>
> How can I do it in the web site?
>
> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>
>
>
>
>




Re: NVDA remote access.

Igor Kaplan
 

Yes, I do, and it shows "connected" on the lock screen.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 5:44 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

And you definitely have autoconnect enabled?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Igor
Kaplan
Sent: 26 September 2016 23:46
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Well, verified today, my configs are definitely used on the security screens
and after the security screen is on the status of remote access plugin is
"connected", however no access at all.
However, if I go to the Remote Access menu, disconnect and then connect
again, right on the lock screen, it works perfectly. It continue to work
after the computer is unlocked, however again stops after the computer is
locked. So, looks like the NVDA attempts to reconnect on the security
screen, I even hear the long beep, the indication of connection, however
there is probably something, which does not let NVDA to connect properly.
I wonder, if connections attempts are recorded to the NVDA log, I could
probably attempt to debug sometime.

All the best.

Igor.
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Go to the NVDA menu Preferences/General, there is a button labelled 'Use
current settings on log-on and other secure screens' to copy them over. You
will require admin priviledges to perform this routine.

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony
Stone
Sent: 25 September 2016 23:59
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

How does one "copy this set-up to the secure screen settings"?

Antony.

On Monday 26 September 2016 at 00:50:58, Chris Mullins wrote:

The way I understand it is that when your work computer drops into the
secure screen it drops your user NVDA settings and loads the secure
screen NVDA settings. So if you have the remote add-on with
auto-connect set for your user NVDA settings and copy this set-up to
the secure screen settings, your work computer will drop its remote
connection when the secure screen appears but immediately re-establish
it when the secure screen NVDA settings are loaded. Similarly, when
you log into your work computer, the remote connection will drop again
and reconnect when your user NVDA settings are loaded. Your local
computer shows as being connected but this only indicates that it is
connected to the host server, not your work computer.

Cheers

Chris
--
Schrödinger's rule of data: the condition of any backup is unknown until a
restore is attempted.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC
me.


Re: NVDA remote access.

Chris Mullins
 

And you definitely have autoconnect enabled?

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Igor
Kaplan
Sent: 26 September 2016 23:46
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Well, verified today, my configs are definitely used on the security screens
and after the security screen is on the status of remote access plugin is
"connected", however no access at all.
However, if I go to the Remote Access menu, disconnect and then connect
again, right on the lock screen, it works perfectly. It continue to work
after the computer is unlocked, however again stops after the computer is
locked. So, looks like the NVDA attempts to reconnect on the security
screen, I even hear the long beep, the indication of connection, however
there is probably something, which does not let NVDA to connect properly.
I wonder, if connections attempts are recorded to the NVDA log, I could
probably attempt to debug sometime.

All the best.

Igor.
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris
Mullins
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

Go to the NVDA menu Preferences/General, there is a button labelled 'Use
current settings on log-on and other secure screens' to copy them over. You
will require admin priviledges to perform this routine.

Cheers
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony
Stone
Sent: 25 September 2016 23:59
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA remote access.

How does one "copy this set-up to the secure screen settings"?

Antony.

On Monday 26 September 2016 at 00:50:58, Chris Mullins wrote:

The way I understand it is that when your work computer drops into the
secure screen it drops your user NVDA settings and loads the secure
screen NVDA settings. So if you have the remote add-on with
auto-connect set for your user NVDA settings and copy this set-up to
the secure screen settings, your work computer will drop its remote
connection when the secure screen appears but immediately re-establish
it when the secure screen NVDA settings are loaded. Similarly, when
you log into your work computer, the remote connection will drop again
and reconnect when your user NVDA settings are loaded. Your local
computer shows as being connected but this only indicates that it is
connected to the host server, not your work computer.

Cheers

Chris
--
Schrödinger's rule of data: the condition of any backup is unknown until a
restore is attempted.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC
me.


Re: FW: Windows 10 and NVDA

Mallard
 

Hello again Anthony,


I forgot to mention, in case you don't know, that you can check what Windows version you're running by pressing the Start key, nad typing


winver


in the search window.


hth, ciao,

Ollie

Il 27/09/2016 10:15, Mallard ha scritto:
Hello,


Yes. I came across this very same problem on a friend's Asus Zenbook.


It was solved by updating Windows to the latest version - 1607.

Make sure you have this version. If not, upgrade and you should be ok.

Ciao,

Ollie





Il 27/09/2016 04:05, Anthony Bernard ha scritto:
FW: Windows 10 and NVDA

_____________________________________________
*From:*Anthony Bernard [mailto:par-avion@sltnet.lk]
*Sent:*27 September 2016 07:29
*To:*'nvda@nvda.groups.i'
*Subject:*Windows 10 and NVDA
*Importance:*High

Hello, recently I started to use an HP Pro book core 85 with NVDA
2016.3. When I press the application key or Shift +F10 NVDA
does not announce anything such as open, properties, rename,
etc. But The screen displays these elements. Have you
encountered this problem? Do you know of any solution? I
will appreciate your reply

Anthony Bernard




Re: FW: Windows 10 and NVDA

Salva Doménech Miguel <kibayasd@...>
 

Hi.
Is a common problem in the last Windows 10’s updates. In the last compilation, 1607 it is solved. Altough, you can also test Win 10 Essentials, the Joseph’s Lee NVDA Addon for improve the use of parts in Windows 10 like the calculator aplication or the search field in start menu.

Cheers

El 27 sept 2016, a las 10:15, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> escribió:

Hello,


Yes. I came across this very same problem on a friend's Asus Zenbook.


It was solved by updating Windows to the latest version - 1607.

Make sure you have this version. If not, upgrade and you should be ok.

Ciao,

Ollie





Il 27/09/2016 04:05, Anthony Bernard ha scritto:
FW: Windows 10 and NVDA

_____________________________________________
*From:*Anthony Bernard [mailto:par-avion@sltnet.lk]
*Sent:*27 September 2016 07:29
*To:*'nvda@nvda.groups.i'
*Subject:*Windows 10 and NVDA
*Importance:*High

Hello, recently I started to use an HP Pro book core 85 with NVDA
2016.3. When I press the application key or Shift +F10 NVDA
does not announce anything such as open, properties, rename,
etc. But The screen displays these elements. Have you
encountered this problem? Do you know of any solution? I
will appreciate your reply

Anthony Bernard



Re: FW: Windows 10 and NVDA

Mallard
 

Hello,


Yes. I came across this very same problem on a friend's Asus Zenbook.


It was solved by updating Windows to the latest version - 1607.

Make sure you have this version. If not, upgrade and you should be ok.

Ciao,

Ollie

Il 27/09/2016 04:05, Anthony Bernard ha scritto:
FW: Windows 10 and NVDA

_____________________________________________
*From:*Anthony Bernard [mailto:par-avion@sltnet.lk]
*Sent:*27 September 2016 07:29
*To:*'nvda@nvda.groups.i'
*Subject:*Windows 10 and NVDA
*Importance:*High

Hello, recently I started to use an HP Pro book core 85 with NVDA
2016.3. When I press the application key or Shift +F10 NVDA
does not announce anything such as open, properties, rename,
etc. But The screen displays these elements. Have you
encountered this problem? Do you know of any solution? I
will appreciate your reply

Anthony Bernard