Date   

Re: Problem with Windows calculator

 

Hi all,

As a follow-up: I will release a development build of Windows App Essentials add-on that will resolve the issue reported in this thread: NVDA does not announce Calculator display content when equals (=) or Backspace key is pressed, traced to the fact that NVDA only knows about a limited number of Calculator hotkeys such as Enter and Delete keys. For users of Windows 10/11 Calculator, do let me know other keys that should be announced when pressed so I can teach NVDA to recognize them with the next stable version of Windows App Essentials add-on.

Cheers,

Joseph


locked Re: control names

Jason Bratcher
 

There Is Absolutely No Way to Change the Presented order of Information in NVDA
(unlike the Jaws sharksters).
I don't Feel NVDA Needs an Information Manager to allow you to change how the information is spoken;
It will only cause trouble later if you forget what you did.

--
Jason Bratcher


Re: Checking A Web Page For Accessibility

Tony Ballou
 

Hi,


They can try using the ARC platform from TGPI.

 

tony

On 3/1/2019 5:47 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Hi,

A client would like to check out a high school’s new web page for accessibility, because they have had trouble with its accessibility in the past.

What is the best site for checking a web page?

Thanks.

Glenn

 

Glenn Ervin  Orientation Counselor II

Norfolk Nebraska

402 370 3436

Cell: 402 992 0325

Welcome | NCBVI

 


Re: can't get out of dialog when deleting large old items in Gmail

 

On Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 04:22 PM, Dan Beaver wrote:
I guess we can rack this one up to me getting old!
-
We all are, Dan, we all are!

My tutorial does not get into all of the various search criteria one can use in order to filter the messages being selected for deletion (or archiving, or whatever).  You've already done the research regarding how to structure the criteria you need for this circumstance.

I figure anyone who needs to know about Google's advanced search operations for Gmail can look that up when they need it just like I do.  I certainly have never memorized all of the options, I just know that a lot of advanced and esoteric ones exist that I might need once every few years, if that.  The determination of exactly how to get the correct messages to be acted upon is, as they say in academia, "left as an exercise for the reader."
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Problem with Windows calculator

 

Hi,

I see what's up. I'll come up with a solution soon. Next time, please give us steps to reproduce the problem, complete with keyboard commands please.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Problem with Windows calculator

 

On Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 03:58 PM, Marco Oros wrote:
Also, I can't update currencies in Windows Calculator.
-
Just as an aside, the entire Currency conversion part of Calculator is not currently working for me.  And that's with zero involvement of any screen reader.  The screen remains blank except for the number pad.  Contrast that with all the other conversion features, which are operating normally.  I suspect a bug has crept in.

This is another of those circumstances where having an alternative "in your back pocket" makes sense.  For currency conversions (or pretty much any type of conversion) all of the web search engines like Google, DuckDuckGo, etc., do those natively in their search boxes when you enter something like [175 USD in GBP].

There are also a number of other calculator options that can be installed under Windows as fallbacks.  The one any given individual likes best if the occasion arises where it's needed will vary.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: can't get out of dialog when deleting large old items in Gmail

Dan Beaver
 

Brian and all,


I guess we can rack this one up to me getting old!  I did everything I could think of but never thought of back tabbing to get out of the dialog.  That now gets me back to the screen where I can select more emails to delete.  Wow, do I feel slow now.


Brian, I will look at your process and see if it is simpler than what I was using.


I was looking around while waiting for responses and found a very simple process  that lets you select all of the emails that are older than a specific time, whether it is days, months or even years, and then lets you delete all of them.  This was what I wanted to do and I just deleted over 8 thousand emails.  Yes, I did want to get rid of that many. :)


Thanks for the suggestions.


Dan Beaver

On 2/7/2022 3:35 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Dan,

What is the "final dialog" under discussion?

As an aside, I did write a tutorial about doing this a long while back: Mass Selection and Deletion of Gmail Messages via the Gmail Web Interface

If you're using a technique that's not the same, this is another alternative.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 

-- 
Dan Beaver (KA4DAN)


Re: Problem with Windows calculator

Marco Oros
 

No.

Let me explain It deeply:

For example, when I pressed equals, It just say nothing and when I have deleted numbers by using backspace, It says nothing.

Also, I can't update currencies in Windows Calculator.

Dňa 7. 2. 2022 o 16:41 Joseph Lee napísal(a):

Hi,

I see. Are you talking about NVDA not announcing things when you type expressions in Calculator? If yes, you must enable speak typed characters.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: can't get out of dialog when deleting large old items in Gmail

 

Dan,

What is the "final dialog" under discussion?

As an aside, I did write a tutorial about doing this a long while back: Mass Selection and Deletion of Gmail Messages via the Gmail Web Interface

If you're using a technique that's not the same, this is another alternative.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


can't get out of dialog when deleting large old items in Gmail

Dan Beaver
 

I am cleaning up a lot of old items and when I have gone through the process and the final dialog comes up I can't get out of it.  It just appears to be a blank dialog.  I can't tab or escape or find any other way to get out of that dialog.  I have to close down gmail and then go back in to delete more items or do anything else with Gmail.


Any ideas?



-- 
Dan Beaver (KA4DAN)


Re: Notes from a developer: what do developers really want in an NVDA GitHub issue

 

Joseph,

Thank you so very much for taking the time and effort to put this together and present it.  It is invaluable information and it is essential information as well.

You have mentioned my tutorial, Creating an Issue in GitHub for NVDA, so I am posting a direct link to it.  In the context of your own offering, I think it is even more important for those who are considering becoming bug report contributors, who may not as yet have a GitHub Account, or wish to create one prior to making up their minds, download my MS-Word template for a GitHub Bug Report, activate that template to open a new, blank fillable form, and have a look around.  It is based, precisely, on the GitHub template that is used, but is a bit more user friendly (in my opinion) to fill out.  But even if you don't want to use the template once you "take the plunge" and become a bug reporter, this is still an excellent way to familiarize yourself with each and every part of the bug report and what you need to fill out to the maximum extent possible (there will, on occasion, be something that's either not applicable or which you simply cannot fill out initially, but those should be few).  Here are the two bug report templates I created:

MS-Word Fillable Form for an NVDA Bug Report Including Pre and Post Filling-Out Instructions

MS-Word Fillable Form for an NVDA Bug Report Including Only Post Filling-Out Instructions
The only difference between the two is that the first, which has pre-filling out instructions, is targeted at those completely new to the exercise including information they need to know.  The one with only post filling-out instructions reminds you that you need to unprotect the document created from the template before you can copy and paste it as a filled out whole in GitHub itself.  They are DOTX files, which means if you have one selected and activate while on it, you are NOT opening the template file itself, but it is being used to generate a blank, fillable MS-Word form for you.  You have not changed a blessed thing about the template itself, and can play and generate blank form after blank form without altering the form structure, so play away!

If you want to acquaint yourself with what's asked for, without the need to actually create a GitHub account before you decide if "being a bug reporter is for me," then have a look at the document that gets created after you activate that template and have a fillable word form.

I did not do one specifically for feature requests, but that would be easy enough to make were there a call for it.

Thank you again for your contribution and for all you have done, and continue to do, in relation to NVDA.

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Notes from a developer: what do developers really want in an NVDA GitHub issue

 

Hello NVDA users,

A few days ago I promised to the community that I will talk about things developers are looking for when we (NV Access and interested third parties) review GitHub issues for NVDA screen reader. Originally planned for last week, I didn’t have time to post the following due to academics. My hope is that you will find the below post helpful in understanding why you get deep questions when posting on GitHub, as well as tips to make lives of everyone easier:

Every week, NVDA developers (NV Access and third-party code contributors) review several feature suggestions and bug reports on GitHub. For people new to what I just talked about, GitHub is a software project and repository hosting service (formerly independent but bought by Microsoft a while back) optimized for open-source projects. As an open-source project, NVDA and related components are hosted on GitHub (GH for short), with many community add-ons hosting their code and issues on the service as well. For an overview on GitHub, visit www.github.com, and for specific info on using GitHub for NVDA users, see a tutorial made by Brian Vogel.

For folks using GitHub, when you submit a new issue (bug report or a feature suggestion), you may notice that a template is generated to help you fill in details. Information asked include a brief description of the problem, steps to reproduce bugs, NVDA version, and for feature requests, what you would like to see in the future. For a general overview on writing good bug reports, see the articles listed in the references list below, because what I will talk about are things not addressed in these references, or if addressed, details are scant as it concerns screen reader bug reports and suggestions.

So what are things expected from folks submitting bug reports and feature suggestions? In addition to being detailed (see the references please), you should:

  1. Fill out the template. Sometimes an issue gets posted that are not using the template to the fullest (such as ones with just a paragraph of a bug description or describes a problem). I guarantee that you will get a comment to the effect of, “please fill out the template,” and in some cases, issues might get closed if this request is not honored.
  2. Be specific about NVDA+Windows+app versions if appropriate. If you just say, “NVDA is installed,” then you may get a reply that says, “hmmm, which version of NVDA are you using?”. Or if you just say, “this problem occurs when using this specific app” without specifying a version, you will get a reply that goes something like, “we need app version information please.” For Windows releases, if you happen to be using Windows 10 or later, you should specify exactly which feature update/build you have; for instance, if I read an issue report that does not specify which Windows 10 build you have, then I will ask you, “hmmm, build please.” I will talk about how to get NvDA+Windows+app version information later in this post.
  3. Write steps to reproduce the issue being reported. Suppose you report an issue with NVDA announcing something other than what you need to know. If you write a report that says, “NVDA says something in an app whereas I want NVDA to say something else” but do not specify how to reproduce steps to hear that announcement, then NV Access will flatly tell you, “please provide steps to reproduce this announcement.”
  4. Describe a feature suggestion. Suppose you want NvDA to do something everywhere, or perhaps change its behavior in a specific context. A report that simply says, “I want NVDA to do this and that” without describing this suggestion in detail is a good way to build a circular road where NV Access and third parties spend days to years trying to understand what’s going on (trust me, this has happened multiple times).
  5. Respond to comments from issue readers. As folks come up with a refined understanding of what your bug report is trying to communicate, you will often receive comments that will ask you to elaborate or give specific scenarios. Please respond to these comments whenever possible. I will come back to this item later when I talk about GitHub etiquette.

 

To elaborate a bit, what are things developers are REALLY looking for when you submit a bug report or a feature suggestion? At a minimum, we (the developers) are looking for:

  1. Your thought process. Think, think, and think again BEFORE you post a bug report or a feature suggestion. Treat GitHub issue writing as writing a formal essay: you need time to gather your thoughts and observations, you need materials such as NVDA version you are using, and you need a strategy to help you write an organized piece of writing.
  2. An organized writing with a clear picture. I realize that I sound like a writing instructor, but GitHub issue writing is, after all, a practice in writing in a professional setting (I will get to the ‘professional setting” concept in a moment). The issue template is there to help you stay organized and to guide you in presenting a clear picture as to an issue that needs to be fixed or a suggestion you have.
  3. Detailed description of the problem you are experiencing (mostly applicable to bug reports). Without a clear and detailed description of the problem you are facing, it becomes harder for developers to picture the scene in their minds, and to developers, this is their worst nightmare. Steps to reproducing a problem (such as keyboard commands used and the version of the app you are using) is a must, otherwise developers will go around in circles. This is what I mean by thinking before you post, because you can make lives of developers easier by taking the time to describe reproduction steps and observing things.
  4. A clear rationale (applicable to feature suggestions). Suppose you wish to talk about a feature suggestion. What would win the hearts of developers: the status quo (what’s going on now) and a suggestion, or a suggestion with a justifiable rationale? Remember that I said to treat GitHub issue writing (including feature suggestions) as formal writing, and you will come to the conclusion that the latter is preferred. Or even better, tell us (developers) the background information so people can research it further.
  5. A professional attitude. As stated in at least one of the references (and many more), developers (including open-source developers and volunteers) are busy professionals. Therefore you must approach and communicate with them in a professional way, including being mindful of the fact that folks are busy, submissions are detailed, and ready to respond when asked. Does this mean contributions should only come from adults? I don’t think so – at least students can provide suggestions and report problems (I have seen folks in their late teens and early twenties who have shown professional attitude when communicating with developers). However, when it comes to code contributions, students must understand where to find credible resources and consequences of their actions (especially their code) before volunteering to submit pull requests (to my younger friends, you must understand that NVDA is a lifeline to thousands around the world). I understand that the latter part of this item would be uncomfortable – my intent is not to discourage students, but to let them know the reality they will face (or are facing) when you submit bug reports and feature suggestions via GitHub, or if you are willing, submit pull requests in the future.

 

You will notice that I emphasize the process before, during, and after submitting an issue on GitHub, more so the “before” moment and the attitude involved. It takes more time and effort (at least I think) in preparing a GitHub issue (as you will see below) than writing and filling out the issue template. The biggest takeaway from the above list is that you MUST think a lot and stay organized (searching for an existing issue is one way to think a lot and stay organized).

As I noted above, as part of submitting an issue on GitHub, you must gather needed materials. An important material is software versions, and here’s how to get them:

  • NVDA: open NVDA menu (NVDA+N), then select Help/About. Listen carefully to the NVDA version text.
  • Windows: open Start (Windows key), type “winver” without quotes, then press Enter. Listen carefully to the version and build texts.
  • App: from the focused app, retrieve developer info from the log (NVDA+F1), then look for “appModule.productVersion” text.

 

References:

 

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Rearranging the taskbar

 

Another interesting thing, and it's consistent for me, is if I am in File Explorer and am using the command to route the mouse to the navigator object, whether it's a file or a folder where the actual mouse pointer is always brought to land is in the date column rather than the name column, which I find quite odd.  Of course I've heard the name announced and can see that's what the screen reader has focus on, but you'd think that the mouse pointer would always be placed at what amounts to "the leftmost end of the line" so that the name of the thing would be announced again, rather than the date modified.  I am doing this "half screen" with the instructions for the steps showing in Notepad on half of my screen (doesn't matter whether left or right) and file explorer on the other side.  I haven't yet tried with a vertical arrangement so that "the full width" of the File Explorer window is on display, but I'm really doubting that will matter.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Rearranging the taskbar

 

On Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 11:18 AM, Gene wrote:
I tried to drag and drop a file from one folder to another and I couldn't but those with knowledge and experience will have to see what results they get when they play around.
-
Well, I cannot get it to work for love nor money in the context of File Explorer and trying to drag and drop a file into a folder, and that's whether I use keyboard left mouse click, or left mouse lock/unlock, after I have routed the mouse to the cursor location for the folder where I want to drop it.

It will be interesting to see where this works versus where it doesn't, but even if it's only for rearranging taskbar icons it's a huge step forward!

I'm not going to keep playing with this as I don't have the patience and there are really few contexts where drag and drop is the only option to accomplish something.  There are some, though.  This is someone else's "let me play with this until I'm exhausted" thing.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Rearranging the taskbar

Gene
 

Thank you.


I hope so.  I haven't used drag and drop in other contexts to discuss that.  I tried to drag and drop a file from one folder to another and I couldn't but those with knowledge and experience will have to see what results they get when they play around.


Gene

On 2/7/2022 10:05 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Gene,

First, this is brilliant.  I've played around for years, but strictly sticking to the keyboard, and it has always been the "final drop" step, trying to use the mouse unlock key sequence, that bombs out.  If all it requires is the use of a real left click, this opens a multitude of doors for keyboard drag and drop so long as the user uses left click as the drop.

I am repeating those instructions below, but with the steps numbered (which makes them easier for me to follow just because I can easily remember which step I was on last if I get distracted):

On Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 08:06 AM, Gene wrote:
1. On the task bar, move to the item you want to move with the right or left arrow keys or move the object navigator to the item you want with next and previous object commands.  The desktop commands are numpad insert numpad 4 for previous object and numpad insert numpad 6 for next object.

2. When you are on the icon, route the mouse to it with numpad insert numpad slash.

3. Lock the mouse with shift numpad slash.  .

4. Move using next or previous object commands to where you want the icon to be.

5. Route the mouse there with numpad insert numpad slash, the same routing command as before.

6. But now, don't use the unlock mouse command, which is shift numpad slash. Instead, use left click, numpad slash.

The mouse will be unlocked and the icon will be in the place you want it to be.
By the way, if your keyboard happens to have a dedicated Insert key, it does not matter if you choose to use that rather than the insert on the number pad (which is always, in my experience, the zero key when number lock is off).  A great many machines these days do not have dedicated insert keys, but some keyboards, particularly super-fancy third party keyboards, do.  I make this note only because some people have trained themselves to use the "hard insert key" and if they've got one, that's just fine if they're used to using it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Rearranging the taskbar

 

Now that I think about it, I really wonder if the NVDA documentation shouldn't be updated for clarity.  After Gene's instructions, it's clear to me that the Left Mouse Lock (SHIFT + NumPad Slash), which is a toggle, would only ever be toggled off if you had accidentally toggled it on, which I had never thought about.  The way the documentation is written, it clearly implies that the "drop part" of a keyboard drag and drop should use the Left Mouse Lock toggle command a second time, but that has never, ever worked for me.

When I think about how "the sighted equivalent" works the description, as currently written, makes sense.  But, I can assure you, the emulated version does not, in a couple of very significant ways, directly mimic the sighted equivalent.  The most significant part is that when you do a "sighted drag and drop" after you've left clicked and keep holding left click, there is a visual representation of the thing(s) being dragged as they are being dragged, and you need to have the mouse correctly positioned in the drop zone before you release the left mouse button to have the drop occur.   No such thing appears when doing this "the keyboard way."  In fact, the keyboard way for doing this has a lot more in common with a cut and paste than a drag and drop in terms of what you see, which suggests to me that the actual underlying mechanism is quite different, even if the end result is the same.

So, that means if you are doing a keyboard drag and drop, for anything, the "pick up to drag" will use the left mouse lock button to grasp the thing(s) being dragged, but you will use a straight left click (whether keyboard emulated or via a mouse button) to do the final drop.  If you use the left mouse lock key sequence, what happens is that the thing(s) are "ungrasped" and left precisely where they started out life; they are not dropped in the drop zone.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Rearranging the taskbar

 

That should have been "real or keyboard emulated left click" in the introductory comment.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


Re: Rearranging the taskbar

 

Gene,

First, this is brilliant.  I've played around for years, but strictly sticking to the keyboard, and it has always been the "final drop" step, trying to use the mouse unlock key sequence, that bombs out.  If all it requires is the use of a real left click, this opens a multitude of doors for keyboard drag and drop so long as the user uses left click as the drop.

I am repeating those instructions below, but with the steps numbered (which makes them easier for me to follow just because I can easily remember which step I was on last if I get distracted):

On Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 08:06 AM, Gene wrote:
1. On the task bar, move to the item you want to move with the right or left arrow keys or move the object navigator to the item you want with next and previous object commands.  The desktop commands are numpad insert numpad 4 for previous object and numpad insert numpad 6 for next object.

2. When you are on the icon, route the mouse to it with numpad insert numpad slash.

3. Lock the mouse with shift numpad slash.  .

4. Move using next or previous object commands to where you want the icon to be.

5. Route the mouse there with numpad insert numpad slash, the same routing command as before.

6. But now, don't use the unlock mouse command, which is shift numpad slash. Instead, use left click, numpad slash.

The mouse will be unlocked and the icon will be in the place you want it to be.
By the way, if your keyboard happens to have a dedicated Insert key, it does not matter if you choose to use that rather than the insert on the number pad (which is always, in my experience, the zero key when number lock is off).  A great many machines these days do not have dedicated insert keys, but some keyboards, particularly super-fancy third party keyboards, do.  I make this note only because some people have trained themselves to use the "hard insert key" and if they've got one, that's just fine if they're used to using it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

I neither need nor want to be appeased, but apprised.  Inconvenient truth is preferable to convenient (for the liar) lies.

     ~ Brian Vogel

 


enhanse phonetic reading addon for Bangla character

farhan israk
 

I am using nvda 2021.3.1 and the latest enhance phonetic reading addon. If I read English characters, I can easily read character information with phonetic information. I mean a for alfa. However, I do not get the same result if I read Bangla characters. How can I fix it?


Re: Rearranging the taskbar

Rowen Cary
 

Thanks Gene, this works.

On Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 09:11 PM, Gene wrote:

I just tried this on my Windows 10 machine and it works.

Gene

On 2/7/2022 7:06 AM, Gene via groups.io wrote: > I finally figured out how to use drag and drop with NVDA to change the > order of task bar icons.  I haven't tested with other screen-readers > so I don't know if NVDA is doing something incorrectly or if this is a > general problem.  I was playing with my Windows  7 machine and I > haven't tried this on my Windows 10 machine yet but it will probably > work. > > > I noticed that the position of an item did appear to change when I > moved it using the mouse lock but when I gave the mouse unlock > command, the icon was still in its original position.  So I decided to > try other things and not just issue the documented unlock command. > > Do everything as you did before but when you get to where you would > issue the mouse unlock command, don't do so.  Instead, left click.  > The mouse will unlock, though this won't be announced and the icon > will be where you want it to be. > > > For those unfamiliar with the entire procedure, I'll give it here. > > > On the task bar, move to the item you want to move with the right or > left arrow keys or move the object navigator to the item you want with > next and previous object commands.  The desktop commands are numpad > insert numpad 4 for previous object and numpad insert numpad 6 for > next object. > > When you are on the icon, route the mouse to it with numpad insert > numpad slash. > > Lock the mouse with shift numpad slash.  . > > Move using next or previous object commands to where you want the icon > to be. > > Route the mouse there with numpad insert numpad slash, the same > routing command as before. > > But now, don't use the unlock mouse command, which is shift numpad slash. > > Instead, left click, numpad slash. > > the mouse will be unlocked and the icon will be in the place you want > it to be. > > > Gene > > On 2/7/2022 6:35 AM, Maria S wrote: > >> Thank you so much Michael. That did the trick. >> >> Maria >>> On Feb 6, 2022, at 10:37 PM, Michael Micallef at FITA >>> michael.micallef@... wrote: >>> >>> Suppose you need to use the alt+shift+right or left arrows. When >>> you open the taskbar. >>> >>> -----Original Message----- >>> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io nvda@nvda.groups.io On Behalf Of Maria S >>> via groups.io >>> Sent: Monday, 07 February 2022 03:22 >>> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io >>> Subject: [nvda] Rearranging the taskbar >>> >>> CAUTION: This email originated from OUTSIDE the Government Email >>> Infrastructure. DO NOT CLICK LINKS or OPEN attachments unless you >>> recognise the sender and know the content is safe. >>> >>> >>> Hi everyone. Does anyone know if a method has been developed to >>> rearrange the icons on your taskbar without having to unpin and >>> repin them? >>> >>> Thanks, Maria >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >> >> >> >> > > > > >

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