Date   

Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,

Dave is correct. I would have mentioned this myself but for the life of me i can't think of the name IBM used for this software. I know if I heard it, I would remember.


On 7/18/2022 11:30 AM, Dave Grossoehme wrote:

Making a search on startpage.com I found out that IBM had a screen reader for Dos.  This was written by a fellow at Harver university by the name of Jim Thatcher as the first Screen Reader.  I wouldn't be surprised by that, when IBM was the first company to have anything that was accessible for the old Main Frame computer.

Dave


On 7/15/2022 11:23 AM, Gene wrote:
This article from AFB says that the first  Windows screen-reader was Window Bridge.
https://www.afb.org/aw/1/4/16165
The first screen reader for a Windows operating system was not released until 1992 when Syntha-Voice Computers released SlimWare Window Bridge for Windows 3.1.

Gene

-- 
Signature:
For a nation to admit it has done grievous wrongs and will strive to correct them for the betterment of all is no vice;
For a nation to claim it has always been great, needs no improvement  and to cling to its past achievements is no virtue!


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Dave Grossoehme
 

Carl:  Yes there was a program that used the period command to produce braille.  There was a large punched card deck that made this possible with a large translation table to  produce dots in the right order to make this happen in order to write on a line printer grade 1 or grade 2 braille.  It took 11 lines for one line of braille to be printed.  This program used a 1403 IBM Printer back in the early 1970's.  I used this program myself in 1972 through 1975.

Dave

On 7/15/2022 12:21 PM, Karl Smith wrote:
You are correct but I think the article was really aimed at human interest describing Ted and the NVDA developers. A real history of how blind people have accessed computers in various ways would take a book. I met a man when I was in Jr. High who worked at the air force base near the school. He had a program I think he wrote which used the period on a line printer to smack the paper hard enough to emboss useable braille for him to read.

Karl


------------------------------

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant
4304 South El Camino St.
Taylorsville, Utah 84129

Phone: 866-824-7885
Fax: 866-824-7885
E-mail: karl@...
Alternate E-Mail: karl.axistech@...


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 10:07 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Yes, there was:
TexTalker by Street
Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert and Vert Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal Operating System)

And, probably, many more. And each of them probably have a background story. To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just an article.

Howard
On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:
I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard
Traxler
Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Very good as a summary. A complete history would have covered many more screen readers and their developers.

Howard


On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:
very nice informative article.

On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io
<bglists@...> wrote:
Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or
are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM
Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that
many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

-Laurie




The hidden history of screen readers






https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-hente
r
-curran
-teh-nvda
































Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Dave Grossoehme
 

Making a search on startpage.com I found out that IBM had a screen reader for Dos.  This was written by a fellow at Harver university by the name of Jim Thatcher as the first Screen Reader.  I wouldn't be surprised by that, when IBM was the first company to have anything that was accessible for the old Main Frame computer.

Dave


On 7/15/2022 11:23 AM, Gene wrote:

This article from AFB says that the first  Windows screen-reader was Window Bridge.
https://www.afb.org/aw/1/4/16165
The first screen reader for a Windows operating system was not released until 1992 when Syntha-Voice Computers released SlimWare Window Bridge for Windows 3.1.

Gene


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Gaylen Kapperman
 

Ken, Yeah! I think your writing a book on the topic is an excellent idea...capture all of the knowledge about the past before it disappears!
Gaylen Kapperman

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Perry via groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2022 9:27 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Not so great article. It is a Jaws love piece. They don't even mention things like ASAP which I found was a much more superior product than Jaws and without it I would have never made it through College without writing my own screen reader.

I have been thinking of writing a book on the history of access including all the old fogies before they pass away. Think anyone would be interested in that?

ken

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Smart
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 10:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Great article.

However, and perhaps I misunderstood, but it sounds like the author suggests Jaws for Windows was the first screenreader for Windows. Nope. The first was Windows Bridge, from SynthaVoice Computers Inc. and was out at least three years before JFW.



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Aravind R
Sent: July 15, 2022 10:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

very nice informative article.

On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io <bglists@...> wrote:
Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or are
we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM
Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that
many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

-Laurie




The hidden history of screen readers






https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-henter-
curran
-teh-nvda

















--


--
--
nothing is difficult unless you make it appear so.

r. aravind,

manager
Department of sales
bank of baroda specialised mortgage store, Chennai.
mobile no: +91 9940369593,
email id : aravind_069@..., aravind.andhrabank@....
aravind.rajendran@....


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Ken Perry
 

Not so great article. It is a Jaws love piece. They don't even mention things like ASAP which I found was a much more superior product than Jaws and without it I would have never made it through College without writing my own screen reader.

I have been thinking of writing a book on the history of access including all the old fogies before they pass away. Think anyone would be interested in that?

ken

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Smart
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 10:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Great article.

However, and perhaps I misunderstood, but it sounds like the author suggests Jaws for Windows was the first screenreader for Windows. Nope. The first was Windows Bridge, from SynthaVoice Computers Inc. and was out at least three years before JFW.



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Aravind R
Sent: July 15, 2022 10:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

very nice informative article.

On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io <bglists@...> wrote:
Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or are
we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin Brian

--
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Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM
Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that
many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

-Laurie




The hidden history of screen readers






https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-henter-
curran
-teh-nvda

















--


--
--
nothing is difficult unless you make it appear so.

r. aravind,

manager
Department of sales
bank of baroda specialised mortgage store, Chennai.
mobile no: +91 9940369593,
email id : aravind_069@..., aravind.andhrabank@....
aravind.rajendran@....


Re: "input gesture dialog" bug

 

Hi all,

Looks like a fix is being deployed to alpha build users, and if things go well, folks will get it as part of NVDA 2022.3.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Luke Davis
 

On Jul 16, Shawn via groups.io wrote:

I had a Commodore 64 in the early 90s with the BB Talker word processor and Sam Say, some Sam games that also used Software Automatic Mouth. I also had
another software screen readers that would let me play some conventional games and text based games, I can't remember the name of it, but it used the same
voice and cartridge that the Intelligent Talking Terminal used. I had that too, but I didn't have a license for that, and it couldn't be cracked.
I would have killed for any of those back in the late 80s and early 90s. I never (until just now) knew that any of it existed. I loved the C64, and later the C128, when I had enough vision to use them (slowly, reading one. Character. At. A. Time.). But that vision never extended to some of the text heavy programs like word processors or online services like Compuserve or the BBSes.

It was very hit or miss in what I could and couldn't do with them. Programming in BASIC was fine, as long as I could keep the screen in 40 character, high contrast mode. But some of those alternate text and graphics modes, made even reading text impossible. Meanwhile I could do some graphics well enough to design colored sprites, though never to do anything useful with them other than amuse myself by moving them around the screen and interacting with each other.

Even made my own windowing system, in BASIC, at one time, which looked slightly like very early Windows dialogs and UIs, though I had never seen any of those.
(As in: outlined box with a title bar, a reverse video info bar, and a soothing background color window with text and outlined buttons and such.)

If I could have gotten a C64 to talk outside of the few games that did it from time to time, that would have been delightful.

Luke


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Luke Davis
 

On Jul 16, Karl Smith wrote:

Does anyone remember the speakwalizer? This was a hardware device developed by someone in the NFB which
connected to a DOS computer and provided speech. I don’t think it required a screen reader as I believe it took information sent to it from the screen and
allowed the user to navigate with controls on the device. I seem to remember it was the only device which would talk during computer setup even before the
OS was running but I may be wrong about that.
I had heard of it, though I don't know if I knew its name. It was this mythical amazing thing that could let you do BIOS/CMOS configurations and accessible OS installs. In my circles there were rumors floating about it, but nobody knew where or how to get one.

I eventually got so good with the DOS setup process, that I could do the whole thing without sighted help; but being able to do POST and firmware work would have been grand indeed.

That was a much more necessary technology to have back then, if you were in the PC building game. I was, but never had any money to really try and track that gadget down.

Luke


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Brian's Mail list account
 

Yes there were lots of these. What I never understood though was that many home computers like The Spectrum had third party synths at silly cheap prices, under 30 quid, and a rudimentary screenreader for inputting basic, but it did not have other half, ie the ability to readscreen output, unless you put it into a string using the allophonic notation.
OK so this was probably only lack of memory and maybe a bit of speed, but it was never done. I mean we were talking processors running at 3.5Mhz 8 bit here, yet recognisable speech in games through machine code was often very possible. It was obviously the lack of will. The industry would rather make a music synth or drum machine instead of something that spoke the text.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Kyle McRorey" <KAmcrorey@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 5:03 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


I know this is not exactly screen reader related but if you wanna talk
about it terms of my first experience with the Internet you could actually
go back to newspaper audio text telephone information services where I
lived in Kansas City there was a service called Startouch and there were
other such services over the country in the 80s and 90s were you could
enter a four digit code after calling a number for news weather and other
information and it had what we would consider at that time were considered
good synthesizers obviously the technology has improved my first screen
reader that I remember using was Jaws 4.0 and windows 98 Notification





Re: When updating nvda, do I always need to deactivate / activate the eloquence nvda add on again?

Brian's Mail list account
 

Of course the only people who can tell you that are the vendors. I suspect that depends on exactly where the update goes wrong. I remember back in the days I used Dolphin screenreaders, they were pretty laid back if this kind of thing happened as were the third parties selling voices not normally included, and that was years ago.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Daniel McGee" <danielmcgee134@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 8:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] When updating nvda, do I always need to deactivate / activate the eloquence nvda add on again?


Hi Gene and Brian

Gene is right, my question is indeed more about licensing.

So basically, within the eloquence and vocalizer add on compatible
release cycle. If I wanted to try out the latest NVDA beta, do I always
need to: one, deactivate the eloquence and vocalizer addon.

Two: update NVDA

Three: reactivate the eloquence and vocalizer addon again.

If one just updates NVDA but something goes Arie during the update
process, does that mean the user loses one of the three activation keys
that come with the purchased addon product.

Hoping this explanation is now crystal clear!

With kind regards

Daniel

On 15/07/2022 10:43, Gene wrote:
Its a question about licensing.

Gene

On 7/15/2022 3:18 AM, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io wrote:
I'm not sure what you are saying. I'd have thought that as the
drivers are part of nvda, at least when it updates, it has to do a
restart and hence cannot speak.
In the case of windows updates when windows does this it normally
runs in a mode where as few bits of windows are running as possible,
so it can update system files and then reboots. So are you saying
that this loses the paid for voices unless you deactivated them
before the update then re enable after it? That would seem a little
odd since most registered software seems happy to re initialise as
windows reboots.
What are you trying to hear during the update process, as of course
Narrator can be set to at least talk some prompts, and maybe finding
a different default voice might help, but unless Microsoft are going
to do an Apple and put in Eloquence as standard, you are probably
stuck with whatever happens here.
Brian


Re: When updating nvda, do I always need to deactivate / activate the eloquence nvda add on again?

Brian's Mail list account
 

Well, most software I have licenses for checks at boot time of the software.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 10:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] When updating nvda, do I always need to deactivate / activate the eloquence nvda add on again?


Its a question about licensing.

Gene

On 7/15/2022 3:18 AM, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io wrote:
I'm not sure what you are saying. I'd have thought that as the drivers
are part of nvda, at least when it updates, it has to do a restart and
hence cannot speak.
In the case of windows updates when windows does this it normally runs
in a mode where as few bits of windows are running as possible, so it
can update system files and then reboots. So are you saying that this
loses the paid for voices unless you deactivated them before the
update then re enable after it? That would seem a little odd since
most registered software seems happy to re initialise as windows reboots.
What are you trying to hear during the update process, as of course
Narrator can be set to at least talk some prompts, and maybe finding a
different default voice might help, but unless Microsoft are going to
do an Apple and put in Eloquence as standard, you are probably stuck
with whatever happens here.
Brian


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Oh man.

I started with the keynote gold on the toshiba 1850 unit now dead.

Forget where it is now but if you can get to the talking dosbox archive thhere is a file called oldgames.7z.

This contains my now dead floppy disk archive.

In amongst the interactive fiction and pc games, there are coppies of keysoft 1.3ff, mastertouch 1.32, mastertouch 2 which I got from somewhere, wordperfect 5.1, dos 6.22 and its supplimentry support disk, and a few other things from the olden days.

Now chances are you won't have the hardware to power all this stuff up but software is out there.

I haven't bothered with talkingdosbox and its files because the project hasen't gone anywhere for ages now and I haven't needed to bother with it.

On 17/07/2022 6:33 am, Karl Smith wrote:
There was also a version of VERT on laptops they called personal vert. I was directing a camp for blind teenagers the summer of 1990 and they, naturally, started calling it pervert.

Karl


------------------------------

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant
4304 South El Camino St.
Taylorsville, Utah 84129

Phone: 866-824-7885
Fax: 866-824-7885
E-mail: karl@...
Alternate E-Mail: karl.axistech@...


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Deenadayalan Moodley
Sent: Saturday, July 16, 2022 11:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Hi,

I also remember Softvert and Vert Plus.

Thanks.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: Friday, 15 July 2022 18:07
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Yes, there was:
TexTalker by Street
Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert and Vert Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal Operating System)

And, probably, many more. And each of them probably have a background story. To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just an article.

Howard
On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:
I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard
Traxler
Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Very good as a summary. A complete history would have covered many more screen readers and their developers.

Howard


On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:
very nice informative article.

On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io
<bglists@...> wrote:
Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or
are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin
Brian

--
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM
Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that
many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

-Laurie




The hidden history of screen readers






https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-hente
r
-curran
-teh-nvda






































Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

tim
 

I was using vocal eyes for dos in 1991 on a IBM PS2, and beta testing windows eyes the next year for win 3.11.

On 7/15/2022 11:00 AM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
I thought it was window eyes which I have used. It might have also been vocal eyes in 1994 or so. I remember quitting to windows or quitting to doss.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Smart
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 7:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Great article.

However, and perhaps I misunderstood, but it sounds like the author suggests Jaws for Windows was the first screenreader for Windows. Nope. The first was Windows Bridge, from SynthaVoice Computers Inc. and was out at least three years before JFW.



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Aravind R
Sent: July 15, 2022 10:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

very nice informative article.

On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io <bglists@...> wrote:
Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or are
we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin Brian

--
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM
Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that
many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

-Laurie




The hidden history of screen readers






https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-henter-
curran
-teh-nvda

















Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Karl Smith
 

There was also a version of VERT on laptops they called personal vert. I was directing a camp for blind teenagers the summer of 1990 and they, naturally, started calling it pervert.

Karl


------------------------------

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant
4304 South El Camino St.
Taylorsville, Utah 84129

Phone: 866-824-7885
Fax: 866-824-7885
E-mail: karl@...
Alternate E-Mail: karl.axistech@...

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Deenadayalan Moodley
Sent: Saturday, July 16, 2022 11:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Hi,

I also remember Softvert and Vert Plus.

Thanks.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: Friday, 15 July 2022 18:07
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Yes, there was:
TexTalker by Street
Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert and Vert Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal Operating System)

And, probably, many more. And each of them probably have a background story. To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just an article.

Howard
On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:
I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard
Traxler
Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Very good as a summary. A complete history would have covered many more screen readers and their developers.

Howard


On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:
very nice informative article.

On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io
<bglists@...> wrote:
Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or
are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin
Brian

--
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM
Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that
many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

-Laurie




The hidden history of screen readers






https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-hente
r
-curran
-teh-nvda


























Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Shawn
 

I had a Commodore 64 in the early 90s with the BB Talker word processor and Sam Say, some Sam games that also used Software Automatic Mouth. I also had another software screen readers that would let me play some conventional games and text based games, I can't remember the name of it, but it used the same voice and cartridge that the Intelligent Talking Terminal used. I had that too, but I didn't have a license for that, and it couldn't be cracked. The voice of the screen reader that used that cartridge had a monotonous voice that had some funny pronunciations for things, pronouncing peanuts as peenutes.

Shawn Klein

On 7/16/2022 10:55 AM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:

The first computer I learned on had Votrex, also, and the first wordperfekt program that was in the computer was wordperfekt 4.2.  Then There 5.0, and finally, the computer the Commission gave me had Articvision and Wordperfekt 5.1.  I still think 5.1 was the best!  They were going to replace that computer, and it had something like 6.0, and the screenreader was Vocal Eyes.  I never got to take that computer home, though, so I don’t know what happened to it.  I had lost my job because of lack of money, and then I didn’t end up getting another one.  Pam.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Arlene
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 6:38 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Hi, I’ve heard of that. My room mate used an apple computer in the mid 80s. You had to put in a floppy disk to activate the voice. Someone demonstrated it at a workshop I attended in the mid to late 80s.  When I learned the computer in the late 80s I used a dos computer that used votrax. My first word program was word perfect 5.1

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: July 15, 2022 10:38 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Hi,

 

In the mid 1980s, I learned the apple II E computer. We had a screen reader called word talk. It was on a floppy disk so you had to put it into the computer’s drive for it to work. There was another one called word rap. It was pretty fast.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JM Casey
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 10:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Yeah. The Echo was for the Apple II line, and was introduced in the late

70s. You had to copy the software to drive the synth/screen-reader onto

every disk you wanted to talk, or else switch the disks once the speech was

loaded -- not a lot of room in memory on the Apple II E once the speech was

loaded, either. Only 128k with an extension card (64k  without!).

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Ballou

Sent: July 15, 2022 12:42 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Hi,

 

Also there were In the early to mid-80's, the Echo, and echo2-plus I believe

if memory serves me correct, and Artic's Business Vision.  And dating back

to the first computer and screen reader access that I experienced which was

while I was a student at the Community College of Philadelphia, 1984's

Information through Speech systems which were designed and produced by

Maryland Computer service. They've come so far from those days, and there's

more than enough history for a book.

 

Tony 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler

Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 12:07 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Yes, there was:

TexTalker by Street

Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert and Vert

Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal Operating

System)

 

And, probably, many more.  And each of them probably have a background

story.  To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just an article.

 

Howard

On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:

> I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard

> Traxler

> Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

> Very good as a summary.  A complete history would have covered many more

screen readers and their developers.

> Howard

> On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:

>> very nice informative article.

>> 

>> On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io

>> <bglists@...> wrote:

>>> Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or

>>> are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin

>>>    Brian

>>> 

>>> --

>>> bglists@...

>>> Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)

>>> Please address personal E-mail to:-

>>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

>>> in the display name field.

>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>> From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>

>>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>> Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM

>>> Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

>>> 

>>> 

>>> Hi,

>>> 

>>> I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that

>>> many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

>>> 

>>> -Laurie

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> The hidden history of screen readers

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fww

>>> w.theverge.com%2F23203911%2Fscreen-readers-history-blind-henter&amp;

>>> data=05%7C01%7C%7C1cd7610a7b4f422f382608da667c20de%7C84df9e7fe9f640a

>>> fb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637934980560512574%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb

>>> 3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3

>>> D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=dkw5gn%2FtPWKMpBF946SnutQUAmeyamRo0N4Kjr

>>> Ar8gM%3D&amp;reserved=0

>>> -curran

>>> -teh-nvda

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Deenadayalan Moodley
 

Hi,

I also remember Softvert and Vert Plus.

Thanks.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: Friday, 15 July 2022 18:07
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Yes, there was:
TexTalker by Street
Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert and Vert Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal Operating System)

And, probably, many more. And each of them probably have a background story. To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just an article.

Howard
On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:
I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard
Traxler
Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Very good as a summary. A complete history would have covered many more screen readers and their developers.

Howard


On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:
very nice informative article.

On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io
<bglists@...> wrote:
Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or
are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin
Brian

--
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM
Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)


Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that
many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

-Laurie




The hidden history of screen readers






https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-hente
r
-curran
-teh-nvda


























Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Pamela Dominguez
 

The first computer I learned on had Votrex, also, and the first wordperfekt program that was in the computer was wordperfekt 4.2.  Then There 5.0, and finally, the computer the Commission gave me had Articvision and Wordperfekt 5.1.  I still think 5.1 was the best!  They were going to replace that computer, and it had something like 6.0, and the screenreader was Vocal Eyes.  I never got to take that computer home, though, so I don’t know what happened to it.  I had lost my job because of lack of money, and then I didn’t end up getting another one.  Pam.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Arlene
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 6:38 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Hi, I’ve heard of that. My room mate used an apple computer in the mid 80s. You had to put in a floppy disk to activate the voice. Someone demonstrated it at a workshop I attended in the mid to late 80s.  When I learned the computer in the late 80s I used a dos computer that used votrax. My first word program was word perfect 5.1

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: July 15, 2022 10:38 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Hi,

 

In the mid 1980s, I learned the apple II E computer. We had a screen reader called word talk. It was on a floppy disk so you had to put it into the computer’s drive for it to work. There was another one called word rap. It was pretty fast.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JM Casey
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 10:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Yeah. The Echo was for the Apple II line, and was introduced in the late

70s. You had to copy the software to drive the synth/screen-reader onto

every disk you wanted to talk, or else switch the disks once the speech was

loaded -- not a lot of room in memory on the Apple II E once the speech was

loaded, either. Only 128k with an extension card (64k  without!).

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Ballou

Sent: July 15, 2022 12:42 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Hi,

 

Also there were In the early to mid-80's, the Echo, and echo2-plus I believe

if memory serves me correct, and Artic's Business Vision.  And dating back

to the first computer and screen reader access that I experienced which was

while I was a student at the Community College of Philadelphia, 1984's

Information through Speech systems which were designed and produced by

Maryland Computer service. They've come so far from those days, and there's

more than enough history for a book.

 

Tony 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler

Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 12:07 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Yes, there was:

TexTalker by Street

Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert and Vert

Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal Operating

System)

 

And, probably, many more.  And each of them probably have a background

story.  To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just an article.

 

Howard

On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:

> I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard

> Traxler

> Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

> Very good as a summary.  A complete history would have covered many more

screen readers and their developers.

> Howard

> On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:

>> very nice informative article.

>> 

>> On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io

>> <bglists@...> wrote:

>>> Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or

>>> are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin

>>>    Brian

>>> 

>>> --

>>> bglists@...

>>> Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)

>>> Please address personal E-mail to:-

>>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

>>> in the display name field.

>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>> From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>

>>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>> Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM

>>> Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

>>> 

>>> 

>>> Hi,

>>> 

>>> I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that

>>> many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

>>> 

>>> -Laurie

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> The hidden history of screen readers

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fww

>>> w.theverge.com%2F23203911%2Fscreen-readers-history-blind-henter&amp;

>>> data=05%7C01%7C%7C1cd7610a7b4f422f382608da667c20de%7C84df9e7fe9f640a

>>> fb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637934980560512574%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb

>>> 3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3

>>> D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=dkw5gn%2FtPWKMpBF946SnutQUAmeyamRo0N4Kjr

>>> Ar8gM%3D&amp;reserved=0

>>> -curran

>>> -teh-nvda

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Howard Traxler
 

Yes, the speakwalizer;  It seemed to be a compination screen reader and synthesizer.  I had one for a time but never got a chance to try it out.  It should have been able to read the system setup screen. Since that time, I've been able to connect, via printer parallel port, to a parallel speech synthesizer (such as the Blazy embosser); and pressing "print screen" key, I could hear the setup screen spoken; or just send it to an embosser.  Rather slow because it spoke and/or embossed the entire screen.  But, by comparing one screen to the next, I could tell what changes I made.  Don't know if that still works today.

Howard

On 7/16/2022 9:39 AM, Karl Smith wrote:

I actually used one of those as well. It had a touch screen and as I still had some vision then I used it at times. I also remember it had 2 3.5 inch floppy drives with 720K disks which was twice the storage of 5.25 inch 360K disks. I used a program whose name I can’t remember but worked like a rolodex to track the NFB of Utah’s member database. The screen actually looked much like a rolodex and you could touch the top or bottom of the roller on the screen and the screen would appear to rotate like a rolodex. I think the talking software was called Talking Information Manager or TIM but I’m reaching very far back now.

One other thing unrelated to this computer. Does anyone remember the speakwalizer? This was a hardware device developed by someone in the NFB which connected to a DOS computer and provided speech. I don’t think it required a screen reader as I believe it took information sent to it from the screen and allowed the user to navigate with controls on the device. I seem to remember it was the only device which would talk during computer setup even before the OS was running but I may be wrong about that.

Karl

------------------------------

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant
4304 South El Camino St.
Taylorsville, Utah 84129

Phone:                 866-824-7885
Fax:                        866-824-7885
E-mail: karl@... <mailto:karl@...>
Alternate E-Mail: karl.axistech@... <mailto:karl.axistech@...>

*From:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Dale Leavens
*Sent:* Friday, July 15, 2022 8:38 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

So far no one has mentioned the modified HP 125 from Maryland Computers called the ITS for Information through Speech.  It had a Votrax synth installed in the base and was a CP/m based computer.  Mostly it was very reliable, quite quick and came with a dual floppy disk system.  I added a 20 meg hard drive outboard system for $7,000 and thought it ran like a rocket.Because of the way much software accessed the terminal portion of the computer most CP/M commercial software wouldn’t talk well but Condor Database worked exceptionally well as did BPI accounting,.

CP/m is a lot like MS-DOS so the operating system was very accessible.

I sure could have used more training on it though.

Cheers.

Dale Leavens

Cochrane Ontario Canada

.

Come visit our polar bears!

On Jul 15, 2022, at 1:37 PM, Rosemarie Chavarria
<knitqueen2007@...> wrote:



Hi,

In the mid 1980s, I learned the apple II E computer. We had a
screen reader called word talk. It was on a floppy disk so you had
to put it into the computer’s drive for it to work. There was
another one called word rap. It was pretty fast.

Rosemarie

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986>
for Windows

*From: *JM Casey <mailto:jmcasey@...>
*Sent: *Friday, July 15, 2022 10:31 AM
*To: *nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject: *Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including
NVDA)

Yeah. The Echo was for the Apple II line, and was introduced in
the late

70s. You had to copy the software to drive the synth/screen-reader
onto

every disk you wanted to talk, or else switch the disks once the
speech was

loaded -- not a lot of room in memory on the Apple II E once the
speech was

loaded, either. Only 128k with an extension card (64k  without!).

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony
Ballou

Sent: July 15, 2022 12:42 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Hi,

Also there were In the early to mid-80's, the Echo, and echo2-plus
I believe

if memory serves me correct, and Artic's Business Vision.  And
dating back

to the first computer and screen reader access that I experienced
which was

while I was a student at the Community College of Philadelphia, 1984's

Information through Speech systems which were designed and produced by

Maryland Computer service. They've come so far from those days,
and there's

more than enough history for a book.

Tony

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Howard Traxler

Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 12:07 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Yes, there was:

TexTalker by Street

Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert
and Vert

Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal
Operating

System)

And, probably, many more.  And each of them probably have a background

story.  To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just
an article.

Howard

On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:

> I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL

>

>

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard

> Traxler

> Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including
NVDA)

>

> Very good as a summary.  A complete history would have covered
many more

screen readers and their developers.

>

> Howard

>

>

> On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:

>> very nice informative article.

>>

>> On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io

>> <bglists@...> wrote:

>>> Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility
week, or

>>> are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin

>>>    Brian

>>>

>>> --

>>> bglists@...

>>> Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)

>>> Please address personal E-mail to:-

>>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

>>> in the display name field.

>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>> From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io"
<lauriemehta@...>

>>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>> Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM

>>> Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

>>>

>>>

>>> Hi,

>>>

>>> I came across this today and am sharing it here because I
think that

>>> many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

>>>

>>> -Laurie

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>> The hidden history of screen readers

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>
https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fww

>>>
w.theverge.com%2F23203911%2Fscreen-readers-history-blind-henter&amp;

>>>
data=05%7C01%7C%7C1cd7610a7b4f422f382608da667c20de%7C84df9e7fe9f640a

>>>
fb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637934980560512574%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb

>>>
3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3

>>>
D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=dkw5gn%2FtPWKMpBF946SnutQUAmeyamRo0N4Kjr

>>> Ar8gM%3D&amp;reserved=0

>>> -curran

>>> -teh-nvda

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Karl Smith
 

I actually used one of those as well. It had a touch screen and as I still had some vision then I used it at times. I also remember it had 2 3.5 inch floppy drives with 720K disks which was twice the storage of 5.25 inch 360K disks. I used a program whose name I can’t remember but worked like a rolodex to track the NFB of Utah’s member database. The screen actually looked much like a rolodex and you could touch the top or bottom of the roller on the screen and the screen would appear to rotate like a rolodex. I think the talking software was called Talking Information Manager or TIM but I’m reaching very far back now.

 

One other thing unrelated to this computer. Does anyone remember the speakwalizer? This was a hardware device developed by someone in the NFB which connected to a DOS computer and provided speech. I don’t think it required a screen reader as I believe it took information sent to it from the screen and allowed the user to navigate with controls on the device. I seem to remember it was the only device which would talk during computer setup even before the OS was running but I may be wrong about that.

 

Karl

 

 

------------------------------

 

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant
4304 South El Camino St.
Taylorsville, Utah 84129

 

Phone:                 866-824-7885
Fax:                        866-824-7885
E-mail:                  karl@...
Alternate E-Mail:              karl.axistech@...

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dale Leavens
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 8:38 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

So far no one has mentioned the modified HP 125 from Maryland Computers called the ITS for Information through Speech.  It had a Votrax synth installed in the base and was a CP/m based computer.  Mostly it was very reliable, quite quick and came with a dual floppy disk system.  I added a 20 meg hard drive outboard system for $7,000 and thought it ran like a rocket.Because of the way much software accessed the terminal portion of the computer most CP/M commercial software wouldn’t talk well but Condor Database worked exceptionally well as did BPI accounting,.

 

CP/m is a lot like MS-DOS so the operating system was very accessible.

 

I sure could have used more training on it though.

 

Cheers.

Dale Leavens

Cochrane Ontario Canada

.

Come visit our polar bears!

 

On Jul 15, 2022, at 1:37 PM, Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:



Hi,

 

In the mid 1980s, I learned the apple II E computer. We had a screen reader called word talk. It was on a floppy disk so you had to put it into the computer’s drive for it to work. There was another one called word rap. It was pretty fast.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JM Casey
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 10:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Yeah. The Echo was for the Apple II line, and was introduced in the late

70s. You had to copy the software to drive the synth/screen-reader onto

every disk you wanted to talk, or else switch the disks once the speech was

loaded -- not a lot of room in memory on the Apple II E once the speech was

loaded, either. Only 128k with an extension card (64k  without!).

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Ballou

Sent: July 15, 2022 12:42 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Hi,

 

Also there were In the early to mid-80's, the Echo, and echo2-plus I believe

if memory serves me correct, and Artic's Business Vision.  And dating back

to the first computer and screen reader access that I experienced which was

while I was a student at the Community College of Philadelphia, 1984's

Information through Speech systems which were designed and produced by

Maryland Computer service. They've come so far from those days, and there's

more than enough history for a book.

 

Tony 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler

Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 12:07 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Yes, there was:

TexTalker by Street

Screen Talk, Vocal-Eyes, and Window-Eyes by GW Windows Bridge Vert and Vert

Pro ProTalk ISOSS Flipper ASAP ASAW Artic Tiny Talk VOS (Verbal Operating

System)

 

And, probably, many more.  And each of them probably have a background

story.  To do a proper history, one could write a book; not just an article.

 

Howard

On 7/15/2022 10:02 AM, Chris Smart wrote:

> I still miss ASAP and my Accent PC card. LOL

> -----Original Message-----

> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard

> Traxler

> Sent: July 15, 2022 11:00 AM

> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

> Very good as a summary.  A complete history would have covered many more

screen readers and their developers.

> Howard

> On 7/15/2022 9:40 AM, Aravind R wrote:

>> very nice informative article.

>> 

>> On 15/07/2022, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io

>> <bglists@...> wrote:

>>> Yes not read it all yet. I'd no idea it was accessibility week, or

>>> are we late to the party due to inaccessibility. grin

>>>    Brian

>>> 

>>> --

>>> bglists@...

>>> Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)

>>> Please address personal E-mail to:-

>>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

>>> in the display name field.

>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>> From: "Laurie Mehta via groups.io" <lauriemehta@...>

>>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

>>> Sent: Friday, July 15, 2022 4:06 AM

>>> Subject: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

>>> 

>>> 

>>> Hi,

>>> 

>>> I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that

>>> many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name.)

>>> 

>>> -Laurie

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> The hidden history of screen readers

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fww

>>> w.theverge.com%2F23203911%2Fscreen-readers-history-blind-henter&amp;

>>> data=05%7C01%7C%7C1cd7610a7b4f422f382608da667c20de%7C84df9e7fe9f640a

>>> fb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637934980560512574%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb

>>> 3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3

>>> D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=dkw5gn%2FtPWKMpBF946SnutQUAmeyamRo0N4Kjr

>>> Ar8gM%3D&amp;reserved=0

>>> -curran

>>> -teh-nvda

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>>> 

>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Add-on Updater notice: introducing Project Meteor to refactor add-on download and installation steps

Ravindran V.S.
 

Agree on this.

Add-ons installed from beside the official pages should also have a feature to be updated through the Add-on updater.

 Thanks,

Ravi.

V.S.Ravindran.

Excuses leads to failure!””

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Saturday, July 16, 2022 1:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Add-on Updater notice: introducing Project Meteor to refactor add-on download and installation steps

 

Well I'd like a feature where you can choose to update addons from either the nvda addon database or thee author spaciffic addons.

Or find a way for something to automatically pole updated releases pages for authors periodically to get updates.

Some updates like tony's addons have not got latest updates to 1.14 and while you can request them manually added to the addon files database surely we need more sources.

Now I realise the potential for misuse but there are somethings that are not even in the main database.

Some others have made other sources and tools but there really should be other ways to select other databases and other mirrors and users.

I mean they do it in linux several sources at once.

 

Not sure how security would work though.

 

On 16/07/2022 4:34 am, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi all,

A significant change is now being tested in Project Meteor in the form of a new try build: https://github.com/josephsl/addonUpdater/releases/download/22.07/addonUpdater-tryProjectMeteor20220715.nvda-addon

The biggest change (to be included in upcoming Add-on Updater stable release) is that disabled add-ons will not be updated by default. Depending on background add-on updates setting:

  • Background updates on: NVDA will just ignore disabled add-ons altogether.
  • Background updates off: disabled add-ons will be unchecked in add-on updates dialog (the one you get after checking for add-on updates). If you somehow check disabled add-ons and select "update add-ons," NVDA will ask if you wish to update disabled add-ons as updating them will enable them after restarting NVDA. If you say "no", NVDA will return you to ad-on updates dialog where you can uncheck disabled add-ons.

Cheers,

Joseph

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